Would you rather be doing a job you enjoy but low paying or one high paying but boring?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Payton Haney



Would you rather be doing a job you enjoy but low paying or one high paying but boring?

I have an extremely low paying job that many people look down on even though I do my best to make other people's lives better. In fact, many in my profession gave up 20% of our salary to ensure that groups of people were paid what they felt they deserved. But that's okay because I love my job and even after 15 years and barely making $ 9 an hour, my family is happy. We have never missed a meal, we have never missed a Christmas or a birthday, we have not had a discussion in 8 years about money. We have never received a handout, although we are constantly scold for why we can't find a better job. I do

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I have an extremely low paying job that many people look down on even though I do my best to make other people's lives better. In fact, many in my profession gave up 20% of our salary to ensure that groups of people were paid what they felt they deserved. But that's okay because I love my job and even after 15 years and barely making $ 9 an hour, my family is happy. We have never missed a meal, we have never missed a Christmas or a birthday, we have not had a discussion in 8 years about money. We have never received a handout, although we are constantly scold for why we can't find a better job. I see it like this: Would you rather have a high-paying job where you could look down on people who earn less than you, or a low-paid job if you know that you are making other people happier? Does the money you earn come back to help everyone else or just yourself and your family? We are happy and yes, it took us years to figure out how to get rid of that desire to earn more money to have "more beautiful" things ... in the end the earth gives us everything we need and sometimes even more than we need. Yes, you may have more beautiful things than me, but if that is the purpose of your life and that of humanity ... we have all failed. The only thing I miss is that most of my old friends from school are now doctors, lawyers, bankers and nurses ... most of them refuse to invite me to their house when there are others who earn similar salaries to them. They almost seem embarrassed. The reason they say we've fallen apart is that my hobbies are different ... this is true, I can't afford to go on annual Disney cruises or Vail trips, I can't take my Porsche to the country club let alone even that they invite me to enter. Everyone, please invite the poorest people you know into your homes and talk about things that they can relate to, if they can't, we are very, very, very different from you again. I have invited countless millionaires to dinner or outside in our house, but EVERYONE has refused ... because they know, where I live, how I live ... but they keep their heads up and their colleagues will never surprise them in the hallways knowing that they were breaking bread at a poor man's house in the United States ... yet they fly to Haiti and the Dominican Republic and share their rooms with the poor there ... because they want to feel good about themselves. If you can't, again, we are very different from you. I have invited countless millionaires to dinner or outside in our home, but EVERYONE has refused ... because they know, where I live, how I live ... but they keep their heads up and their colleagues will never surprise them in the hallways knowing who were breaking bread at a poor man's house in the United States ... yet they fly to Haiti and the Dominican Republic and share their rooms with the poor there ... because they want to feel good about themselves. If he can not, again, we are very different from you. I have invited countless millionaires to dinner or outside in our home, but EVERYONE has refused ... because they know, where I live, how I live ... but they keep their heads up and their colleagues will never surprise them in the hallways knowing who were breaking bread at a poor man's house in the United States ... yet they fly to Haiti and the Dominican Republic and share their rooms with the poor there ... because they want to feel good about themselves.

This year, find someone at your job who earns less than you and who has been doing this for years ... give them your paycheck, invite them over to your house, pay for your kids to see a movie ... if you do Feel better I'm glad we could be your release But better yet, try to survive on $ 9 an hour and feel the power and love of the working poor.

Years ago we had a division between people on the basis of race and gender ... today it is 10 times worse, it is a class division that will only get worse ... you have become Prince John society ... stealing hopes and dreams of the poor. Would you like some more of our money ... that would make you happier?

I think this is a very personal question with many factors. How important is your career to your self-esteem and happiness? What * is * your dream job (it could already be very well paid)? In addition, there are many "intermediate" jobs that balance pay with interest. Not to mention, everyone has different levels of passion for their interests.

Personally, as long as I don't hate my job and between all the days dreading it, that would be fine. My dream jobs are unfortunately very competitive and not well paid. Basically I would love to work as a museum curator, archaeologist, anything that has to do with history (n

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I think this is a very personal question with many factors. How important is your career to your self-esteem and happiness? What * is * your dream job (it could already be very well paid)? In addition, there are many "intermediate" jobs that balance pay with interest. Not to mention, everyone has different levels of passion for their interests.

Personally, as long as I don't hate my job and between all the days dreading it, that would be fine. My dream jobs are unfortunately very competitive and not well paid. Basically I would love to work as a museum curator, archaeologist, anything to do with history (not teaching) or even conservation. You have to go through a lot of academic hurdles over many years, and then fight a bunch of other people for a small number of positions to get paid a pittance. It's honestly not worth the sacrifice for me, but for those with stronger passions, I'm sure it will be.

The idea that if you do something you love every day, you will never work a day of your life is silly to most people. A lot of people don't really * know * what really makes them happy to begin with. I have met many people who had their own businesses based on their passions, only for it to kill their love for them. You may think you want to own a pet store because you love animals, but the reality is that after a couple of years, chances are that you will hate it and start to dislike the hobby (and people, I saw 4 groups of people running the same pet store for a decade and it ended up the same with everyone, although they were all totally different personalities). A friend has been running a Chinese tea shop as was her passion, but now, After doing it day after day for more than 2 to 3 years, she confessed that she too had lost her love for her. You need to enjoy your business, but not be passionate about the subject or so passionate that it is literally all you want to do for the rest of your life. I've even met artists who thought they really wanted to make a career out of their art, only to follow it through college and have the course kill their passion and, in one case, end up training as a chef! My husband thought he wanted to pursue acting for only his freshman year in college to kill his passion and instead switched to a computer-related course. only to follow him through college and make the course kill his passion and in one case finish retraining as a chef! My husband thought he wanted to pursue acting for only his freshman year in college to kill his passion and instead switched to a computer-related course. only to follow him through college and make the course kill his passion and in one case finish retraining as a chef! My husband thought he wanted to pursue acting for only his freshman year in college to kill his passion and instead switched to a computer-related course.

Throughout my career, I've found that I actually take more pride in who I work for than the job itself. I write, edit and test as part of the marketing department of a STEM company. I neither hate nor love him. When I was a kid, I really wanted to be some kind of scientist, but I wasn't gifted in the arithmetic department. So, being too weak in math to do it practically, I ended up in a position where I can say I work in STEM, get involved in something else that interests me, and build on my strengths and get paid. a comfortable amount. I am not burdened, I am not poor. I am not a museum curator, but I feel like I am doing something worthwhile and for a company that I am happy to be a part of. Good balance for me. I'm also the type who works for a living so my career is not a big part of who I am but it helps me enjoy all the things that I am passionate about, it has allowed me to support my husband while in college and also have a lot of fun hobbies. My husband is a type of life to work, so his career is where he gets most of his self-esteem, but for him, the amount he earns is part of that.

  • Are you the type of person who wants a fulfilling career or a fulfilling life outside of your career? If it's the latter, as long as your job finances your lifestyle, it shouldn't matter too much. Just make sure you don't do work that makes you dread waking up every day, because that becomes its own hell. As long as you are well and you pay for the life you want, you will be fine. If your career means a lot to you, then ask:
  • How passionate are you about the jobs you want to do? To figure this out, find your 'line' of how far you would go to achieve your dream. If your dream means a lot of sacrifice and competition, is it worth it for you? If the only thing you want to do is be an actor, an artist or whatever and you will do whatever it takes because it is the only thing you want in your life, full stop and if you have to beg in the streets, work for free, miss important events, everything For the chance to get your job, then you will, do it, because it really is what you want more than anything and the money is a bonus for you. If you don't want to do all of that, then you're not passionate enough and that's okay. Most people are not. You better express your interests in other ways while making money doing something you don't hate.

A2A

First you get enough money not to have to work.

This tends to be the amount it takes to get rid of 5% of your current salary. You can easily get a guaranteed rate of return of 5%; higher, if you actively work your money.

Since the second thing you do is work wherever you enjoy working after that, chances are you're not actively working with your money, unless that's what you like and enjoy working, so expect 5%.

Because at that point you don't depend on your paycheck to keep the lights on and the food in your fridge.

So if your income is around $ 200,

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A2A

First you get enough money not to have to work.

This tends to be the amount it takes to get rid of 5% of your current salary. You can easily get a guaranteed rate of return of 5%; higher, if you actively work your money.

Since the second thing you do is work wherever you enjoy working after that, chances are you're not actively working with your money, unless that's what you like and enjoy working, so expect 5%.

Because at that point you don't depend on your paycheck to keep the lights on and the food in your fridge.

So if your income is around $ 200,000 / year then you need to have $ 4M. Once you reach that goal, then you do whatever it is you want to do.

If yours is to actively work your money, you will get 8%. If so, you can get by with "only" $ 2.5M.

If you can live on less, say $ 100K / year, then it is proportionally $ 2M at 5% or $ 1.25M at 8%.

You will potentially trade a large chunk of your youth doing this, unless you start racing or win at the "starter wheel." Some people never win at "starter roulette," and the salary is generally lower at startup, where part of their pay is in equity, than in established businesses.

To minimize taxes so you get to your number faster, you can go to a smaller tech center in a state with no income taxes. For example, Seattle Washington or Austin Texas.

Seattle is useful because it has some big companies like Microsoft or Amazon where you can get paid relatively well and live on the Oregon border. You don't pay income tax in Washington and you don't pay sales tax in Oregon, so if you carry what you're buying, you can make the trip every two weeks or so. New car? Go to Portland.

In addition, there are enough people who have made money in large companies and have decided to undertake. So if you want to get through a couple of years, you at least have the option to play "starter roulette" and go for a great initial public offering or takeover by another company to make your stock options worth something.

So I guess the summary of my answer would be:

"If it's an option, do one first, and that will give you the freedom to do the other."

It is quite rare that I see such a successful question in my wheelhouse. I have had many jobs throughout my life. My wife regularly asks me if there is anything I haven't done! I have also done the same (or more or less the same) work in different companies. With a 20-year career in the theater, I have spanned a wide range of bosses and locations across the country. I was even on tour for a short time that went to Europe. And, now, I am a life / management coach, as well as owning 2 small businesses. One of those businesses is a daycare for dogs - you know, the job that everyone listens to and tells me how much they just want

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It is quite rare that I see such a successful question in my wheelhouse. I have had many jobs throughout my life. My wife regularly asks me if there is anything I haven't done! I have also done the same (or more or less the same) work in different companies. With a 20-year career in the theater, I have spanned a wide range of bosses and locations across the country. I was even on tour for a short time that went to Europe. And, now, I am a life / management coach, as well as owning 2 small businesses. One of those businesses is a daycare for dogs - you know, the job that everyone listens to and tells me how much they wish they could do it. The other is the opposite: my store sells work boots. It can't be less glamorous than working with guys after they come off a hard day at work building ____________, they take off their shoes. Yes, it's a lot of glamor, but I own the store… so that makes me an entrepreneur! (You will have to imagine rolling your eyes.)

So my thoughts here: spend your life doing what you love. It's that easy. I will continue with a few more sentences, but if you are a final winner, that is your thought.

You work 2,080 hours a year, assuming you only work 40 hours a week, 50 weeks a year. That is completely a third of your life is working. 1/3 is sleeping. So I'm not sure how much fun you can have with the rest, but that last 1/3 should also incorporate: cleaning the house, doing the laundry, babysitting, paying the bills, traveling, spending time with your family (like them or not), fix the car, mow the lawn ... you get the idea.

Money is important, don't get me wrong. I'm not saying plan your life to work at McDonald's. While those people are important, and some may love their jobs, they will really have a hard time getting by. The job just doesn't pay that much. If you can get a job in most cities in the US for 50,000 a year, and you don't just waste your money, you can live well. Have a job in a company that treats you well, and in a job that you find rewarding and you will never work a day in your life. I really mean it. Let me blow your mind:

First you have to know: I love dogs. We have 3. Nothing is better after a long day than coming home to the love of my dog. (Yes, family too… blah blah blah.) My dog ​​is there for me no matter what. He doesn't get mad at me for anything, he always wants to snuggle. Is incredible! However, running a doggy day was not for me. I dodged a bullet here. You see, I wanted to buy the doggie daycare. My wife decided at the last minute that she wanted to manage it. So, I relented. Turns out, she did me a huge favor.

I don't mind constant cleaning. I will be spending my weekend this week doing repairs at the site. I run the shoe store and I have no problem working with the public. However, working 5-6 days a week in a building with 50 dogs, where there is always some barking, is very difficult. I am a quiet guy. I don't do well with that noise level. My wife is fine with that. She loves her job, I enjoy mine. (Love may be a bit of a stretch for the whole shoe store thing, but you get the point.) That noise level would have driven me even crazier than I already am.

So, in short, assuming you will not have financial problems for the rest of your life, get a job that you like. Money really won't buy you happiness. Just my $ .02, but I've had a lot of jobs.

First, let's shed some light on what "love" and "hate" mean in this context.

"Hate" means that you absolutely can't stand your job. In scientific terms, this means that you are under stress during your work hours. Any doctor will tell you that stress is bad for you. Heart disease, diabetes, and depression are just a few of the bad things that happen as a result of prolonged stress.

Stress aside, doing a job you hate is a sign of failure. As we go from children to adolescents and adults, we gain more control over our lives; more power. So logically we should be much happier as adults compared to our

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First, let's shed some light on what "love" and "hate" mean in this context.

"Hate" means that you absolutely can't stand your job. In scientific terms, this means that you are under stress during your work hours. Any doctor will tell you that stress is bad for you. Heart disease, diabetes, and depression are just a few of the bad things that happen as a result of prolonged stress.

Stress aside, doing a job you hate is a sign of failure. As we go from children to adolescents and adults, we gain more control over our lives; more power. So logically we should be much happier as adults compared to our childhood. But if your adult life is full of unhappiness, which includes doing something you don't enjoy for 40-60 hours a week, this means you haven't been able to get your life in order. Having "Monday blues" is a strong sign that you don't like your job.

"Love" means that you enjoy doing your job. More specifically, this means that your job uses those skills that you are gifted with. You have found a perfect combination between skill and task. You go home each night feeling satisfied and leave home each morning eagerly anticipating what your job might offer you that day.

Too many critics say that people looking for a job they love are simply lazy or simply want entertainment at work. Sorry, but you are wrong. A job you love is simply a job that perfectly matches your natural abilities with the requirements of the job, and fun is just a by-product of that.

It is important to remember that we talk about jobs that we hate and jobs that we love, but there are people who do not have jobs. There are people who have been applying for years without success. It is important to be grateful for what you have.

So, make sure you know yourself from a young age to make the right decisions to land the dream job you love. Unfortunately, if you end up with a job you hate, spend all your free time becoming capable for that job you love.

Too many people are doing the wrong things for the wrong reasons, especially in their careers. What I've found is that people who take positions just for the money end up mediocre at best in the long run, and then burn out.

Life is short and much of it involves our career. This is my advice to make both of them great.

I am often asked who is building a new career,

"Where do I start? How can I build a solid career path?"

My answer?

Start with what makes you happy.

Keeping things quite simple, I have three operational 'lessons' that I wish I had known very early in my career: Passi

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Too many people are doing the wrong things for the wrong reasons, especially in their careers. What I've found is that people who take positions just for the money end up mediocre at best in the long run, and then burn out.

Life is short and much of it involves our career. This is my advice to make both of them great.

I am often asked who is building a new career,

"Where do I start? How can I build a solid career path?"

My answer?

Start with what makes you happy.

Keeping things simple enough, I have three operational 'lessons' that I wish I had known very early in my career: passion, partnership, possibility.

Passion

Focus on what you are passionate about and empower your day, life, profession, whatever it is, with that passion. That is not possible all the time and every day. That is life and responsibility. Focus primarily on that passion.

Camaraderie

Do the right. Not what it is now.

Develop a great partnership with yourself and don't act on everything right now. Take a moment, breathe and look ahead, beyond that 'moment'.

That keeps your 'operation', relationships, partnerships and YOU sustainable. He also avoids building a life and career full of reactionary chaos.

Possibility

Trade with your legacy definition in mind, not your competition as you build your career path.

I am a businessman so I am not naive.

Be aware of the competition, but don't react to everything your competition does, you will simply become your competition. That's boring.

This comes down to knowing yourself, your passion, and staying as true to that as possible.

As you develop your career (or make a change), focus on those three areas. Most of the time you will be happier and your performance will be much more sustainable.

Hope it helps answer your question.

I think most people will respond to a job they really enjoy at a moderate salary, however, I think a lot of people would benefit from having an uninteresting job at a higher salary for a couple of reasons.

1) The most interesting jobs that you really enjoy, and are ALSO high paying, can only be achieved by serving time in a boring, moderately paid job. We are in an interesting time where baby boomers have stayed in the workforce and brought you skills and experience long ago, when people would normally have retired. This has created a lot of apathy and indifference in work attitudes in me.

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I think most people will respond to a job they really enjoy at a moderate salary, however, I think a lot of people would benefit from having an uninteresting job at a higher salary for a couple of reasons.

1) The most interesting jobs that you really enjoy, and are ALSO high paying, can only be achieved by serving time in a boring, moderately paid job. We are in an interesting time where baby boomers have stayed in the workforce and brought you skills and experience long ago, when people would normally have retired. This has created a lot of apathy and indifference in the work attitudes of the younger generations. As boomers age out of the workforce, there will be a great need for Gen X and millennials to adopt these desirable positions and those with the discipline and long-term focus to bridge this gap will win.
2) I have personally worked on jobs with both situations. My experience is that the highest paying boring job allows you to have a lot more fun outside of work and enjoy your life more as a whole. Being able to take interesting trips and have interesting experiences makes you a more interesting person. This brings more people closer to you and enriches your network. This increases the chances of developing relationships with people in such boring and higher paying job, which can alleviate / compensate for monotony.

I came across your post because I kept quiet a lot of introspection. This is my story. I am a very creative person and I loved skin care since the beginning of time, but my family pushed me into accounting, from which I retired, then they pushed me to the law and I also quit, then I got the first job that I could get in finance. …. Eventually I was earning over 100k, but let me tell you what happened to my health. the finance field I worked in was so extremely stressful and painful for me that I started having panic attacks, my blood pressure was always high even though I am young, my stomach always

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I came across your post because I kept quiet a lot of introspection. This is my story. I am a very creative person and I loved skin care since the beginning of time, but my family pushed me into accounting, from which I retired, then they pushed me to the law and I also quit, then I got the first job that I could get in finance. …. Eventually I was earning over 100k, but let me tell you what happened to my health. The finance field I worked in was so extremely stressful and painful for me that I started having panic attacks, my blood pressure was always high even though I am young, my stomach always had headaches, I was always sweating, I stopped from eating well and most nights I couldn't sleep, my hair was falling out. But hey, I was making a lot of money I used to buy makeup and clothes that I thought would make me happy. I was traveling, which made me happy, but every time I traveled I felt anxious about having to go home and go back to work. I became allergic to my job and money no longer made me happy ... in fact, I spent a lot going to various doctors. I was diagnosed with multiple fibroids that grew 4 to 12 cm over the course of 3 years that I spent working my most stressful job. my family begged me to quit my job but I held on because I was so afraid of what people would think, of losing all that money ... my depression was getting worse ... I was leaving every morning in a miserable daze hating myself for worry about what society would do. Think about if I just quit my job and went and did something I loved, even if it paid less. one morning, while leaving depressed, I was hit by a car ... that for me was a sign, a sign that if I didn't go out, something worse could happen to me. I finally quit my job and left that industry forever, I had surgery ... I still have scars that remind me of how unhappy and stressed I was. I spent the next 6 months getting my skincare license and now I found a job in the aesthetics field ... I haven't had a panic attack in 8 months, I sleep and eat normally, I have the desire to live and work in my new industry for the rest of my life. I also learned a valuable lesson: the worst prison you can find yourself in is worrying about what other people think. if you can survive on a small salary but are happy, that's all that matters ... we will all die one day and life must be worth living until that time comes. Was it difficult for me to accept a low salary after getting used to a large salary? absolutely! But health is something that money cannot buy and overtime if you work a job that you hate, you will lose what matters most: your health.

There are many aspects to this question. Should I do what I love? For some, the answer is simple: yes. Software engineering is not just their passion, it will most likely land them a well-paying job. For others, their passion is not likely to be immediately profitable: acting, music, or teaching. Additionally, there are financial responsibilities that make it difficult to pursue one's true passion: raising a family, paying off thousands of loans, or even simply paying the rent.
I think a lot of people would benefit from having an uninteresting job with a higher salary for a couple of reasons.

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There are many aspects to this question. Should I do what I love? For some, the answer is simple: yes. Software engineering is not just their passion, it will most likely land them a well-paying job. For others, their passion is not likely to be immediately profitable: acting, music, or teaching. Additionally, there are financial responsibilities that make it difficult to pursue one's true passion: raising a family, paying off thousands of loans, or even simply paying the rent.
I think a lot of people would benefit from having an uninteresting job with a higher salary for a couple of reasons.

1) The most interesting jobs that you really enjoy, and are ALSO high paying, can only be achieved by serving time in a boring, moderately paid job. We are in an interesting time where baby boomers have stayed in the workforce and brought you skills and experience long ago, when people would normally have retired.

2) I have personally worked on jobs with both situations. My experience is that boring, higher paying work allows you to have a lot more fun outside of work and enjoy your life more as a whole. Being able to take interesting trips and have interesting experiences makes you a more interesting person.

Hope this has helped you clear things up.

Connect with me on Linkedin (Aachri Tyagi) to ask more questions.

Most people will respond to a job they really enjoy, even if the pay is low; however, I think a lot of people would benefit from having an uninteresting job with a higher salary for a couple of reasons.

First of all, everyone wants to be able to meet all their needs for themselves and their family. We all know that today it is not very cheap to live the desired lifestyle. It is important to keep up with life. No matter how much you love your job, trust me, you will be disappointed very soon if you don't see any progress in your earnings.

On the contrary, ha

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Most people will respond to a job they really enjoy, even if the pay is low; however, I think a lot of people would benefit from having an uninteresting job with a higher salary for a couple of reasons.

First of all, everyone wants to be able to meet all their needs for themselves and their family. We all know that today it is not very cheap to live the desired lifestyle. It is important to keep up with life. No matter how much you love your job, trust me, you will be disappointed very soon if you don't see any progress in your earnings.

On the contrary, having a boring job with a high salary allows you to fully enjoy your life. And when you see that everything was worth the happy moments that you live later, it motivates you to continue.

Doing what you love is crucial, and I'm not saying you shouldn't do what you love the most if it doesn't generate enough income for you. But in my opinion, it is better to mix it with something more profitable, so that both of you feel comfortable and know that you can give yourself everything your heart desires.

Honestly, I'm very happy with my job Yes, where I don't earn a lot of money but I love my students and I love my job. If I had become an accountant as my accounting degree claimed, or had worked for the IRS, as I proved, I would have made a lot more money. But I would have been so much more miserable. My brother is an accountant and all I heard for years were stories of disgruntled customers, flying around counting inventory to match what the books say, hearing his wife complain that he was home late or had no life for tax season. I was married to a NYPD for 16 years.

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Honestly, I'm very happy with my job Yes, where I don't earn a lot of money but I love my students and I love my job. If I had become an accountant as my accounting degree claimed, or had worked for the IRS, as I proved, I would have made a lot more money. But I would have been so much more miserable. My brother is an accountant and all I heard for years were stories of disgruntled customers, flying around counting inventory to match what the books say, hearing his wife complain that he was home late or had no life for tax season. I spent 16 years married to a New York police officer, who spent every day complaining about his job. Every day and every night he would say, "I hate my damn job." When we first married, I asked him if he wanted to quit and get another job. Did not say. We both knew that he would hate any job he had. So, there was no way around it. When we had the children, I told him that he could not use that expression with them. What if they go to school saying that? It would certainly tell you where the children heard it. He agreed, but made it clear that he didn't like having to accept it.

Fortunately, my children looked up to my father, who loved to work and was sad the day he had to retire. The mind was willing, the body could not.

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