Would Steve Jobs still be alive if he hadn't tried natural therapies for his cancer?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Callum Anderson



Would Steve Jobs still be alive if he hadn't tried natural therapies for his cancer?

Steve Jobs did not have the typical type of pancreatic cancer. He had a relatively rare pancreatic endocrine tumor (3% of pancreatic cancers) that often grows much more slowly. A 9-month delay in surgery probably did not change his situation from curable to incurable. Apparently, during the operation, the surgeons visibly discovered that the cancer had spread to his liver.

It is very likely that it would have been present in the liver, even microscopically 9 months earlier.

But there is no way in this life to know what it could have been, not in politics, baseball, romance, or the stock market.

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Steve Jobs did not have the typical type of pancreatic cancer. He had a relatively rare pancreatic endocrine tumor (3% of pancreatic cancers) that often grows much more slowly. A 9-month delay in surgery probably did not change his situation from curable to incurable. Apparently, during the operation, the surgeons visibly discovered that the cancer had spread to his liver.

It is very likely that it would have been present in the liver, even microscopically 9 months earlier.

But there is no way in this life to know what it could have been, not in politics, baseball, romance or the stock market, and certainly not in sickness and health. Mr. Jobs's desire to avoid or delay surgery was not unusual. And given the type of tumor he had and the way it was found, his decision to wait may not have been as badly considered as it might seem at first glance.
His wife, Laurene Powell Jobs, declined requests for an interview and permission to speak with Jobs' doctors. But let one of them comment briefly: Dr. Dean Ornish, a friend of Mr. Jobs, who is also a well-known advocate for using diet and lifestyle changes to treat and prevent heart disease.

Dr. Ornish said that when the diagnosis was first made, he recommended that Mr. Jobs undergo surgery. But in an email, he added:
“Steve was a very thoughtful person. In deciding whether or not to have major surgery, and when, he spent a few months consulting with various doctors and scientists from around the world, as well as his team of excellent doctors. It was his decision to do this.

“This type of surgery is very important and should not be taken lightly. He underwent surgery when he decided what he wanted to do. No one could have been more thoughtful and intelligent about how he did this.
"No one can say whether having surgery earlier would have made any difference due to the possibility of micrometastases."


Micrometastases are tiny cancers that form in various organs when a tumor begins to spread and spread throughout the body. Dr. Ornish's comment means that, in theory, Mr. Jobs's tumor could already have spread invisibly to his liver when it was first diagnosed. If it had, trading earlier probably wouldn't have made any difference.

Dr. Edward M. Wolin, co-director of the Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumor Program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said that among patients with the type of cancer Mr. had, about 60 percent of the time it has already metastasized to the liver. "


Another expert, Dr. Steven K. Libutti, said that based on his reading of the new biography, it seemed likely that Mr. Jobs's tumor had spread when it was found, and the delay in surgery probably did no harm. . Dr. Libutti is director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care in New York and its neuroendocrine tumor program.

Hindsight is kind to Steve Jobs' decision to delay surgery

Probably not. Pancreatic cancer is almost always fatal, even for those who have surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation. The natural therapies he tried, whatever they were, prolonged his life or made no difference. You probably wasted many months consulting with people who knew the same thing. He probably could have talked to just one oncologist and gone ahead and had the same surgery. Also, sadly, MD Anderson's Dr. Aggarwal is one of the few doctors who are considered cancer experts who do not rule out the possibility that non-pharmaceutical chemicals can

Keep reading

Probably not. Pancreatic cancer is almost always fatal, even for those who have surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation. The natural therapies he tried, whatever they were, prolonged his life or made no difference. You probably wasted many months consulting with people who knew the same thing. He probably could have talked to just one oncologist and gone ahead and had the same surgery. Also, sadly, MD Anderson's Dr. Aggarwal is one of the few doctors who are considered cancer experts who do not rule out the possibility that non-pharmaceutical chemicals may have some impact on the progression of pancreatic cancer.

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