With the rapid advancements in technology, many jobs will be replaced by machines. What jobs are safe from automation?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Issac Bowman



With the rapid advancements in technology, many jobs will be replaced by machines. What jobs are safe from automation?

You must assume that, for now, there is NO job that is always safe from the threat of automation. Whatever your job, given enough time, a robot could easily emulate you. It is just a matter of optimization.

Even the most complicated tasks, when fragmented, can be represented as an incredible multitude of smaller and simpler tasks. A good example of this would be a car engine:

Many people pretend to understand how a car engine works, all while dreading the day when they will have to raise the hood and try to work on the thing. But an engine is not as unique as it is complicated

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You must assume that, for now, there is NO job that is always safe from the threat of automation. Whatever your job, given enough time, a robot could easily emulate you. It is just a matter of optimization.

Even the most complicated tasks, when fragmented, can be represented as an incredible multitude of smaller and simpler tasks. A good example of this would be a car engine:

Many people pretend to understand how a car engine works, all while dreading the day when they will have to raise the hood and try to work on the thing. But an engine is not so much a complicated singular monolith as several smaller, simpler elements - elements so simple, in fact, that they have been around for centuries in one form or another.

To begin to understand the situation humans face, let's begin by examining the application of mind power.

When we get down to business, our brains are quite similar to those of computers. In fact, we are incredibly fast and capable computers. We regularly make approximations based on vector calculations and parabolic trajectories when, say, we throw objects between us. We are incredibly fast when it comes to recognizing names and faces. And we are capable of learning and creating something that computers never could.

Our problem is simply optimization: we as human beings are naturally very good at human things. We are good at finding patterns, socializing, hunting, climbing, and running long distances, along with other very specific things. But when we are put in charge of a task that is not naturally required of us, we tend to get bored easily. (Be honest: does your average desk job necessarily excite you?)

This principle applies quite well to computers as well, of course. You would never expect your Xbox to perform well as a desktop computer. (You can make it happen, but you don't do it very well.) Or, for your toaster to play video games. (It can, but again, not very well).

However, there are robots and computers that can learn to take on even the most exotic tasks. There are robots that are learning to drive cars, like Google's. Or perform surgeries, such as the Da Vinci Surgical System. Or do legal work. Or write newspapers. Or fight wars. The list goes on and on.

The technology is here right now; it's only a matter of time before it becomes commonplace. The computing power needed to replicate the iPhone existed in the 90s. But it was too expensive to pocket and affordable for everyone. Over time, that changed.

Is there some quiet here? Is there any way to combat this? Any job that will continue to be a safe haven for automation?

Well possibly.

As mentioned above, I am not convinced that there are jobs that cannot eventually be outsourced to automation. With enough time and optimization, a computer can successfully emulate any human task.

My question, however, is this: Will we always want them to?

Like most things in economics, we follow money. And as of this writing, the money is in the hands of the people. We exchange goods and services with each other, based on our needs and preferences. You go to your Starbucks, give your money to someone, smile, and ask for coffee.

Most of the jobs that robots threaten to replace are jobs that depend on something outside of human life. Human beings were not naturally made to drive cars or read newspapers. And so it is much easier for robots to tackle these problems that we have artificially created in our society.

So the answer to our question is this:

What jobs are there that are based on perfectly optimized human attributes, jobs that are not made for mindless tedium, but that depend on being performed by no less than a human? Or better yet, what jobs are there that we will always want another human to do?

Can you think of a job out there where you would rather hire and pay one of THESE people…?

… Instead of buying THIS computer….

….to do the job?

I can think of some jobs that I can think of:

1: Nurse, Caregiver or Nanny - This is undoubtedly a growing industry, particularly as life expectancy continues to grow. Anyone who personally cares for the health and well-being of another person can be guaranteed hiring preference over a robot. Nobody wants to stare at a cold, insensitive robot when they are lounging in a hospital bed. Warm and loving human beings will always be preferred.

2: Teacher: Some might question this, particularly with self-study or online courses that threaten to void this position. I'm not completely sold on that concept, considering I tried online learning in my high school. I remain unconvinced that a student can get a full educational experience without a personal mentor. There is a marked division between a computer that gives information to a student and a teacher that presents him with the opportunity to grasp the knowledge.

3: Artist - While unlikely to hold its own as a major part of the economy, computers will always have a harder time skillfully influencing an audience's emotions the way a human artist would. Critics will point to computer science examples like Emily Howell, who can write avant-garde contemporary music so convincingly that when subjected to blind judgment, professional music critics are unable to distinguish her from a human composer. I refute the claim by pointing out that avant-garde art critics have been unable to distinguish between works made by a chimpanzee and a human being since at least 1964. This has not prevented the greatest of artists from being human.

4: Prostitute - As much as people scoff or blush at this comment, I maintain that the oldest profession in the world may well still be the oldest profession in the world. Whores, gigolos, escorts, strippers, porn stars, etc., have an unequaled security in their professions, because their greatest attraction is their human character.

Most people are quite myopic about the tasks of a sex worker. The reality of the matter is that a prostitute provides much more than sex; they provide human connection. Ask anyone who has ever worked or spent the night with a prostitute, and half the time they will tell you that one of the fundamental influences was just a matter of having someone to share an interpersonal experience with. To spend the night talking, or for dinner, or even just to cuddle.

Pimps, on the other hand, are doomed. With the advent of social media, more and more sex workers are finding freelance jobs, making prostitution safer and less corrupt than ever.

5: Religious pastor or motivational speaker: The very image of a robot taking the guise of a devout ruler, standing on the podium, screams dystopian at us. When we look for a capable leader, we look for a human. When we look for someone to help us interpret the constitution or our religious texts, we would never dream of putting our dearest elements of our faith in the hands of a cold machine.

6: Programmer: Even if robots are getting better at learning to learn by themselves, there will still be a demand for people to teach robots to learn to learn things by themselves. Be careful: by choosing to take this career path, it is very possible that you will become the contributing factor to the demise of humanity. Or it could be the person who creates the army of machines that personally leads you to victory. Either way, exercise your power with care.

7: Mathematician: Robots, as it happens, are terrible at math. Ask any programmer who has come across rounding errors or stack overflows. When a computer analyzes a mathematical problem, it is not so much about answering the question as it is about analyzing all the possibilities until it finds an answer (or set of answers) that makes sense. Computers are no better at math than humans - computers are simply faster at math than they do decent. Truly exploring and developing the field of mathematics requires creative thinking and mental power that I am not convinced a machine can ever achieve.


I'm sure there are more vacancies out there. I regularly find myself thinking of more positions and adding to my list of (more) secure jobs as a kind of mental exercise.

I am sure I have neglected some possibilities. Please, if you can think of more, add them in the comments below.

Jobs in the creative design industry, everything related to on-site maintenance or caring for vulnerable people. Also anything based on conservation. There will always be a demand for people in the entertainment industry and entrepreneurs will always prosper.

We will always need politicians and reporters.

These things (I'm sure there are many more) require uniquely human abilities.

Other responses have claimed that, in the long run, nothing is certain. In my opinion, it is a naive and theoretical point of view that simply does not stand up to scrutiny in the practical world.

Even now when we have technology

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Jobs in the creative design industry, everything related to on-site maintenance or caring for vulnerable people. Also anything based on conservation. There will always be a demand for people in the entertainment industry and entrepreneurs will always prosper.

We will always need politicians and reporters.

These things (I'm sure there are many more) require uniquely human abilities.

Other responses have claimed that, in the long run, nothing is certain. In my opinion, it is a naive and theoretical point of view that simply does not stand up to scrutiny in the practical world.

Even now, when we have the technology to do all kinds of smart things, we have the situation where even the big banks don't do a lot of them because the financial investment is not considered worthwhile.

This is the key point, nothing is free and it will only be automated if you accumulate financially.

Suppose technology advances to the point where we have self-learning, self-aware machines that have the mobility, dexterity, perception, and sensory facilities to do what people do. This comes at a cost and is not negligible. Is anyone going to bother teaching low-paid skills to expensive, maintenance-intensive devices?

It's also worth keeping in mind that the robo-apocalypse scenario is based on the world continuing to develop as it has for the past 100 years. We have had pandemics, wars, political upheaval, genocide, and natural disasters. Furthermore, we still have a great divide between the developed world and the developing world. Even if the gap is closing, how likely is it that we will achieve global equality?

The notion of a situation in which no one anywhere needs to work is based on a whole series of geopolitical factors, which must coincide in a complementary way.

Forget theory, practical questions will be the most influential.

Fundamentally, anything that has or creates scarcity value. Human beings value things that are rare, such as the skills of an elite athlete or great performance. We wouldn't pay a lot to see robots play sports, but we would collectively pay a very large amount to watch Lionel Messi play soccer or Kobe Bryant play basketball.

We may all have an exact 3D printed copy of Van Gogh's Starry Night on our walls, made by robots for pennies, but there is still an original and it is priceless. A robot can produce 5,000 original paintings while I produce one, but only mine is in short supply

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Fundamentally, anything that has or creates scarcity value. Human beings value things that are rare, such as the skills of an elite athlete or great performance. We wouldn't pay a lot to see robots play sports, but we would collectively pay a very large amount to watch Lionel Messi play soccer or Kobe Bryant play basketball.

We may all have an exact 3D printed copy of Van Gogh's Starry Night on our walls, made by robots for pennies, but there is still an original and it is priceless. A robot can produce 5,000 original paintings while I produce one, but only mine has scarcity value if I have a reputation as an artist. We can all have IKEA furniture for very little, even less if it is made entirely by robots, but if we have the money to spare, we would still replace it with a nice old Queen Anne piece or an item from a craftsman that costs much, much more. . . We could print more copies of the first Superman comic, but only the originals are collectibles.

Have you ever thought about how many blockbuster movies and TV shows there are these days, or how many people can earn a decent living from sports, or how people can make millions on YouTube or by making their own clothing line? or simply for being famous for a while? 100 years ago there were very few professional athletes or artists, and none who earned the income that people earn these days. This boom is entirely due to automation.

The more automation, the less we pay for our mass-produced basic needs. The less we have to pay to live, the more jobs will be available on the margin (worth doing because our daily costs are lower), as long as they are doing something with scarcity value. The more automation, the more free time we have to pursue our interests and develop rare skills.

Many of us also have capital and land, which in addition to work are the other key elements of production. I have written elsewhere Tom Foale's response to Larry Page believes that artificial intelligence and robotics will free people from work and improve their lives. If you don't have a job, how do you earn income? on how I'm going to go into manufacturing, leasing, and renting spaces, using just my small plot of land with my 4-bedroom house. All without spending a lot of my time and further reducing the amount I need to earn from production. Being local will be much more important in the future.

All jobs will eventually be automated over time.

This automation process has been on the right track for 3 decades and is only getting better in scope and pace as investment capital seeks the highest return on investment - Wikipedia.

The first jobs to disappear will be the jobs with the highest return on investment: Wikipedia which is somewhat unskilled and repetitive.

Manufacturing and transportation (autonomous car - Wikipedia) will be fully automated in a few decades.

As time goes on, higher paying jobs with a lower degree of difficulty will be sequentially partially automated and then fully automated.

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All jobs will eventually be automated over time.

This automation process has been on the right track for 3 decades and is only getting better in scope and pace as investment capital seeks the highest return on investment - Wikipedia.

The first jobs to disappear will be the jobs with the highest return on investment: Wikipedia which is somewhat unskilled and repetitive.

Manufacturing and transportation (autonomous car - Wikipedia) will be fully automated in a few decades.

As time progresses, higher paying jobs with a lower degree of difficulty will be partially automated sequentially and then fully automated.

The last jobs to be automated will be the jobs that create the automation process.

I have worked for over 30 years in over 20 companies making a great living by permanently destroying the jobs of others through automation. Often times it comes in the form of productivity software that allows 1 worker to do the work that previously required N workers to do, reducing the number of jobs by (N -1) / N. It's time for most of them to wake up and Intellectually digest what has been, is and will be happening in Silicon Valley - Wikipedia. Positive economic growth requires fewer human workers, not more human workers, as these increasingly cheap automated smart machines are essentially unpaid slave labor.

Unfortunately, there will be a growing glut of human labor that will cause the wages of the remaining jobs (babysitters, painters, musicians, artists, etc.) to plummet.

The idea of ​​universal basic income - Wikipedia is an attractive solution to this problem because the possibility of working for a decent life is rapidly disappearing for the vast majority of human workers. This is the direct result of the inevitable unstoppable rise of ever cheaper and more capable smart automated machines.

Universal basic income: Wikipedia is a free market idea where citizens and consumers can decide how to spend their money in the free market for economic goods and services. It is far better than the government picking winners and losers, or worse, directly providing cheap goods and services. Economic liberalism - Wikipedia is a better model than government-led socialism - Wikipedia.

Universal Basic Income: Wikipedia will allow consumers to buy goods and services increasingly cheap, as most human beings will be unemployed or working in jobs with lower and lower wages. Again, raising the minimum wage is a spectacularly bad idea, as it only accelerates the rate at which ever cheaper automated smart machines permanently replace human workers, as investment capital is focused on replacing human workers every day. more and more expensive. Eliminate minimum wage and add universal basic income - Wikipedia is a better solution.

Smart automated machines are now essentially automating the human brain, as these machines learn faster and more accurately than most humans regarding the job skills required to get work done in a growing number of fields. Also, these smart automated machines are less error prone and much cheaper than humans. These smart automated machines simply make economic workers more efficient with regard to producing less expensive economic goods and services compared to the vast majority of human workers.

While many incorrectly argue that automation has been going on for centuries and that humans have always found and will find other means of making a living by creating new jobs in new fields, these same people also argue that nothing ever changes.

For example, automated systems self-diagnose, self-correct, and self-repair 90% of the time. It is a fairy tale myth that it will take a considerable number of human workers to run these systems. The design and implementation goal is to remove as many costly and error-prone human workers from the process. the goal is always fewer human workers.

Companies that use robots to produce inexpensive goods and services will win in the market, while companies that employ human workers will lose. This is a desirable optimal economic outcome. I have made a living permanently destroying others' jobs with productivity software for almost 3 decades. These increasingly inexpensive automated smart machines are economically more productive than the average low- or middle-skilled human worker. The long-term economic race has already been lost forever for all these low- to medium-skilled workers despite the fact that most humans deny it, for obvious reasons, as losing to a machine is shameful. When was the last time a human correctly answered more questions than Google?

Investment capital seeks the highest return on investment: Wikipedia. The greatest return on capital investment is achieved by investing in ever cheaper and more capable smart automated machines, rather than creating jobs for humans. As time passes, human workers have increasing costs, while these machines have decreasing costs.

In a global economy, there is no way to stop the ever-increasing use of ever cheaper and more capable smart automated machines that replace ever-increasing numbers of human workers. Globally, corporations using humans lose, while corporations using increasingly cheap and capable intelligent automated machines win. In the end, the increase in economic efficiency is unstoppable.

On the positive side, the vast majority of human beings in the medium term will not be forced to work, as ever cheaper and more capable smart automated machines provide the growing majority of inexpensive goods and services at ever lower prices.

The key issue to be resolved is the political-economic transition, since machines, not humans, increasingly generate the majority of economic production. Economic gains will not be distributed evenly, leading to a growing wealth disparity. Intellectual property: Wikipedia headlines will get an ever-increasing share of the wealth, as is happening today. In general, the world will get richer, but the average worker will likely become poorer as the rate of wage deflation exceeds the rate of deflation of economic goods and services produced.

Traditionally, the work of human workers has been taxed to fund governments. In the future, robotic workers will have to pay more and more taxes in some way to make up for this income shortfall. So far the wisdom of reducing corporate tax rates.

What is happening, and will happen, is a massive deflationary ongoing event both in terms of human wages and economic goods and services produced. Ironically, any minimum wage, or worse, a rising minimum wage, will ensure that the vast majority of human workers will lose at a faster rate as the intelligent automated machine becomes cheaper and cheaper while the human worker becomes less expensive. becomes more expensive.

This scenario of machines permanently replacing human workers plays out on a daily basis on Sand Hill Road - Wikipedia, where venture capital - Wikipedia is deployed to replace workers with smart automated machines to increase economic efficiency. There is a growing ocean of venture capital - Wikipedia seeking this fate as future earnings are safely protected by United States patent law - Wikipedia.

Yes, estimating future cash flow is always uncertain to some degree, but United States Patent Law - Wikipedia was deliberately constructed to precisely mitigate this economic hurdle by protecting intellectual property - Wikipedia. As a Silicon Valley worker at many early stage startups, I am very familiar with this process. Venture capitalists understand this too, so risk is pretty manageable now and indefinitely in the future, which is why I posit that most industries will automate in a few decades.

This short video describes the scenario.

A sample of current articles documents that this process has come a long way over the years. This is not news to anyone who has been paying attention in recent decades.

Can universal basic income counteract the harmful effects of the contract economy?

As aid donors embrace transformation, India reflects on a universal basic income

What could a universal basic income mean for the future of work?

Basic income is not a magic formula, but it can still save us

IPhone maker Foxconn plans to replace nearly all human workers with robots

The Chinese factory replaces 90% of human workers with robots. Production increases 250%, defects decrease 80%

Bill Gates says it's too early for basic income, but eventually 'countries will be rich enough'

Bill Gates Says Robots Taking His Job Must Pay Tax

Elon Musk doubles universal basic income: 'It's going to be necessary'

Where it's made: a Ford car in China

A robot revolution, this time in China

As always, this is just my perspective and just pecking from the surface of things (like anything else, there are plenty of other perspectives too).

Look, I have trouble with a lot of futuristic predictions about technology and jobs because they seem to leave out of the equation a crucial element for any human society: humans! At some point, doesn't it seem like wondering whether or not technology will replace all human jobs is akin to asking whether bees will eventually take over all the roles of the ant colony? See, technology by nature is complementary to humans, whether it is an automaton.

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As always, this is just my perspective and just pecking from the surface of things (like anything else, there are plenty of other perspectives too).

Look, I have trouble with a lot of futuristic predictions about technology and jobs because they seem to leave out of the equation a crucial element for any human society: humans! At some point, doesn't it seem like wondering whether or not technology will replace all human jobs is akin to asking whether bees will eventually take over all the roles of the ant colony? Look, technology by nature is complementary to humans, be it automation, genetics, transportation, energy, etc.

Many scholars, experts, engineers, etc. reiterate that the nature of human jobs (as human societies) has always been in a state of flux as technology has developed and evolved over the ages (Will robots eliminate jobs? Five questions for David Autor) . In the past, these academics were repeated, with new technology replacing old tasks, humans were actually able to spend more time and energy on other tasks or problems, so new positions emerged on the path of professions. There are numerous studies and thinkers that predict what the jobs of tomorrow will look like in the coming decades and centuries. Here are a couple of really useful starting points.

55 jobs of the future

The world in 2100

There may be a point where technology reaches a singularity, that's where technology has evolved to be totally and undeniably self-sufficient and perhaps self-replicating, so you could imagine drones like in Star Wars or androids and holograms in Star Trek where beings smart robot. they consider themselves individuals and live a full life like humans (Technological Singularity - Wikipedia).

But even if there was a singularity on the horizon, which is uncertain, wouldn't humans have a certain advantage (along with trillions of other creatures)? Hello, humans have been making this being alive for a while now, for tens of thousands of years. I'm not going to speculate in other areas regarding the whole question of the role of technology in human evolution or how humans and these artificial technology beings would coexist (along with the trillions of other species that exist). And keep in mind that automated technology, artificial intelligence, and digitization have been around and growing for decades (Timeline: 50 Years of Hard Drives). These questions are beyond the scope of this answer, but I would at least consider certain domains, issues or efforts to remain domains where humans play a critical role. I list the largest domains because throughout history professions have generally been sublevels of the larger domains or subjects that fostered them. There are many more people in different types of societies who participate in an endeavor or domain in addition to professional-level specialists, due to hobbies, entertainment, or other reasons. These domains should continue to hold humans in a critical role because by nature the domains are valued by human civilizations and societies as "human" roles, requiring a human being with physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual characteristics considered human. Let me name a few, and these actually reach broader domains or topics rather than just profession: There are many more people in different types of societies who are engaged in an endeavor or domain in addition to professional-level specialists, due to hobbies, entertainment, or other reasons. These domains should continue to hold humans in a critical role because domains are by nature valued by human civilizations and societies as "human" roles, requiring a human being with physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual characteristics considered human. Let me name a few, and these really reach into broader domains or topics rather than just the profession: There are many more people in different types of societies who participate in an endeavor or domain in addition to professional-level specialists, due to hobbies, entertainment, or other reasons. These domains should continue to hold humans in a critical role because by nature the domains are valued by human civilizations and societies as "human" roles, requiring a human being with physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual characteristics considered human. Let me name a few, and they really do go into broader domains or topics rather than just profession: These domains should continue to hold humans in a critical role because by nature domains are valued by human civilizations and societies as roles. " humans", that require a human being with physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual characteristics considered human. Let me name a few, and they really do go into broader domains or topics rather than just profession: These domains should continue to hold humans in a critical role because by nature domains are valued by human civilizations and societies as roles. " Humans ”, which require a human being with physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual characteristics considered human. Let me name a few, and these really reach into broader domains or topics rather than just the profession: and these actually reach broader domains or issues rather than just the profession: These domains should continue to hold humans in a critical role because by nature domains are valued by human civilizations and societies as "human" roles, which they require a human being with physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual characteristics considered human. Let me name a few, and these really reach into broader domains or topics rather than just the profession: and these actually reach broader domains or issues rather than just the profession: These domains should continue to hold humans in a critical role because by nature domains are valued by human civilizations and societies as "human" roles, which they require a human being with physical, emotional, psychological and spiritual characteristics considered human. Let me name a few, and these really reach into broader domains or topics rather than just the profession:

Arts / humanities / music / writing / etc—

So yes, there are automated technology jobs done across the various disciplines of the humanities, and even entirely new moves in each field to incorporate the latest in automation, artificial intelligence, and algorithms. Some artificial technology has even gotten to the point of writing novels. Is the future award-winning novelist a writing robot? - Los Angeles Times. So far, it seems that the biggest automated technology is helping humans create art or literature, as the previous article showed that 80% was human work. But technological assistance in the development of works of art, literature, music, etc. It is nothing new, in fact it has been going on for centuries. It was the printing press that allowed books and literacy to reach a wider variety of people than ever before in the 15th century (Printing - Wikipedia). This changed the role of scribes, yes, but it allowed writers to reach larger audiences and heights unprecedented before. And humans have been creating machines that can autonomously produce art or music from their direct influence for millennia. Think of wind chimes that fill the streets of Ancient Rome (Wind Chimes - Wikipedia) or even bagpipes that pump air before people start to play. Will there come a day when technology becomes so developed that it can produce complete novels, literary works, musical compositions, etc.? If so, It can be argued that even then entirely new genres or disciplines could be developed in the arts and humanities that are a further hybrid of humans and technologies. So, as in previous revolutions or changes, the need for humans continued and new opportunities arose. Keep in mind that each of the disciplines of the arts and humanities are a whole world unto themselves, so there is always more to discover, learn and create. Furthermore, the arts and humanities are such diverse key domains for capturing not only the greatest human ambitions and wonders, but also beyond the human, as well as considering the world and billions of creatures other than humans. Whether it is ancient folk tales from thousands of cultures over thousands of years, like these,

or the millions of compositions, works, etc. that speak of the world of worlds in our physical universe and beyond, it is unfeasible to consider that technology and automation will not entrench themselves in this great diversity of these vast limitless domains that attract information not only about the human condition and experience, but also the infinite wonder and mystery of existence (Joseph Campbell: Myths to Live By (Part One) | BillMoyers.com). This includes music, arts, literature, writing, etc.

And let's not forget that entire domains of writing, arts, and humanities are all about capturing moments in the human experience. A memoir writer takes careful precision to create memories of his own mind into a new final product accessible to others (Memoir - Wikipedia). As in many other domains, the rise of technology has only helped humans perform in this domain like never before. And again the day that an artificial intelligent being like the Doctor from Star Trek Voyager can participate in the arts and humanities at the level that humans do, it will be the human counterparts who are the experts with thousands of years of history of thriving in. these. areas. Who knows what the new genres or subjects will bring in the arts / humanities of tomorrow,

Let's not even entertain the apocalyptic scenario of science fiction where artificial intelligence captures humans in an imprisonment of technical reality like The Matrix (The Matrix - Wikipedia), but the greatest of human wisdom and creativity embedded in the arts and the humanities are thriving even in these kinds of situations. science fiction reality, which for that fictional timeline is actually the greatest human creativity and wisdom helping the last free humans rise up against the machines

Customer service / service industry—

The service industry is not just a good profession that requires a certain class of people, it is one that is fundamental to a nation or economy. Grocery stores, auto mechanics, cashiers, baristas, etc. cannot be shipped. abroad, and these jobs generally remain strong during the economic downturn. After the US "dot com" bubble of the early 2000s, when millennials still wore diapers or struggled with the problems of adolescence and Gen X and baby boomers struggled to make sense of What happened after the internet revolution of the late 90s, the US regressed with a surge in old-fashioned service jobs.

Now, twenty years later, the rise of technology has once again revolutionized all facets of people's lives, smart devices cloud our kitchens and cars. We even have smartphones with "personal assistant" programs that will do things for us with a simple voice command. The online platforms amazon.com, google, and ebay are matched by traditional retailers that have their share of the ball game like walmart.com. And brand new online companies like Fresh Ingredients, Original Recipes, Delivered to You save families from needing to go to the store. If you use your smartphone as a phone and call a business / toll free number, chances are, you get an automated system updated from decades of leading technologies to guide you through a wide range of options without having to talk. A person.

But for people of all ages, the thing about automated technology service is that it is wonderful and amazing, until it stops being so. For customer service over the phone, older generations fear having to call if they have a question about a bill, bill, or problem and remember the day they could just pick up the handset and ask to be contacted by someone at the phone. another line.

The younger generations depend on technology to do many things, and will continue to do so for years and decades to come. But the rise in technology does not detract from the immeasurable value of face-to-face human interaction. And whatever advancements in automation and technology come along, there is always a person somewhere in the background to ensure the highest standards of human service, care and professionalism are met. The idea behind Facebook and Twitter is that they allow people to connect like never before, and share memories and events from their lives on one central platform, while also using these social media platforms to start entirely new social and political movements. . And we have a new revolution in which entirely new marketing and service professions have been created online. Customer service jobs have also increased as companies have more ways to connect with their customers than ever before. Most companies have customer service departments that receive comments and complaints via email or social media platforms.

And while the new wave of automated systems and digital technology is revolutionizing customer service, there is still the value of traditional and authentic face-to-face. While Wal-Mart and other stores internationally get a bad rap for poor ratings on service and customer experience (Walmart and Sears get the lowest ratings for customer satisfaction), there are other brick-and-mortar companies that continue to revolutionize technology. while they pride themselves on providing excellent Customer Service ratings. Hy-Vee in the American Midwest is one of those multi-million dollar businesses where shoppers get "a helpful smile in every aisle," along with options to pick up their groceries through self-service. In the meantime, This chain offers personalized services for buyers unprecedented in the industry, from on-site dietitians to executive chefs offering brand-name recipes (https://www.hy-vee.com/). Also, stores like Fareway in the US Midwest still offer the courtesy clerk to bring purchases to your car (Fareway - Wikipedia). And international companies in countless industries still value human customers first, so the best and brightest experts in human customer service will always be needed to guide national and global companies and economies. obsessed with the customer in 2018). from on-site dietitians to executive chefs offering brand-name recipes (https://www.hy-vee.com/). Also, stores like Fareway in the US Midwest still offer the courtesy clerk to bring purchases to your car (Fareway - Wikipedia). And international companies in countless industries still value human customers first, so the best and brightest experts in human customer service will always be needed to guide national and global companies and economies. obsessed with the customer in 2018). from on-site dietitians to executive chefs offering brand-name recipes (https://www.hy-vee.com/). Also, stores like Fareway in the US Midwest still offer the courtesy clerk to bring purchases to your car (Fareway - Wikipedia). And international companies in countless industries still value human customers first, so the best and brightest experts in human customer service will always be needed to guide national and global companies and economies. obsessed with the customer in 2018).

Acting / Drama / Entertainment / Sports / Recreation

I put all of this into one category because throughout the ages these domains, like the arts and humanities, have been diverse enough to include not only humans, but also creatures and entities beyond humans. In the theater, it has been since the dawn of civilization that animals have occupied the stage live with humans (Animals on the English Stage). Not to mention in movies and television the countless shows or titles that list animals as main characters in Lassie the collie dog (Lassie - Wikipedia) or entire networks dedicated to capturing the unimaginable lives of the trillions of creatures beyond humans (Documentary Nature - Wikipedia). How automated technologies and artificial intelligence find their place in these domains and professions will remove the roles of humans and other beings does not appear to be a problem. Globally, for generations we have had movies, shows, etc. hits where humans weren't anywhere on set (just voices in the story) that still allowed studios and screenwriters to make billions (Top 20 Animated Movies of the 21st Century, Ranked). And before animation, there were decades of equal cartoons (Classic cartoons and animated series). Now imagine a day in the distant future when large amounts of drama and entertainment (acting, animation, cartoons, etc. ) are developed and carried out using artificial intelligence or automated systems. Would it still be of interest to the world's population of humans who pay billions to attend matinees or binge on Netflix or Amazon nights? Again, it seems that the mix of human beings and beings beyond humans will need a balance to maintain value and authenticity.

Now sports and recreation have dominated global human societies for millennia and each encompasses a whole world of rules, challenges and enrichment in itself (Sport - Wikipedia). But sports are also diverse and include both humans and non-humans. The economics, scale and well-being of sports and recreation as broad as international pet shows with the finest human companions (China International Pet Show (CIPS) to international cups and events featuring the best of human endurance in countless shapes and forms, be it football (2018 FIFA World Cup Russia ™ - FIFA.com), triathlon games (ITU announces 2019 Triathlon World Series Calendar | Triathlon.org) or international Olympics (Olympic Games - Wikipedia), To name a few, it depends on human interests. and values ​​at the individual and social level. And just like throughout the ages,

The latest in technology and automation has led to the evolution of entirely new sports and recreation that offer entirely new jobs and human endeavors. While many fear that technology will create new global generations of people isolated from the world and unfit to thrive without the latest SmartApp, it is actually the opposite that many new technologies create a revolution that brings people back to the world. Once, only the fittest scouts, military personnel, or outdoor / scout youth organizations were expected to navigate outdoors with a basic compass or by reading stars and moss in trees. Now sports like geographic caching allow millions of people of all ages to "hunt for the treasure" in search of capsules placed by others. " And with technology, completely new sports have already been introduced with the latest automation and artificial intelligence, including drone racing (The Drone Racing League - The Drone Racing League). Remember that sports and recreation, like other areas, have always incorporated humans as well as beyond humans. And if the uniqueness occurs in the next century or beyond, it will be necessary to maintain the balance between the diversity of human beings and beyond for sports and recreation to flourish. they have always incorporated both humans and beyond humans. And if the uniqueness occurs in the next century or beyond, it will be necessary to maintain the balance between the diversity of human beings and beyond for sports and recreation to flourish. they have always incorporated both humans and beyond humans. And if the uniqueness occurs in the next century or beyond, it will be necessary to maintain the balance between the diversity of human beings and beyond for sports and recreation to flourish.

And keep in mind that just like in manufacturing, arts, etc., in sports and recreation, we have been using technology for centuries, which actually enhance humans by playing or participating in sport and without machines or technology take over.

A pitching machine, for example, has the primary purpose of helping a baseball player practice hitting or (JUGS Softball Pitching Machine | HittingWorld.com) or an aspiring professional hockey player to prepare for the Major League Baseball tryouts. next year.

But we don't pay multi-million dollar salaries to these mechanical gadgets (certainly the newest automated technology, even super smart) even though, in theory, they could be designed to launch dozens of miles per hour faster than humans. The list of the highest-paid pitchers in the professional leagues has never included machines or mechanical gadgets and does not appear to do so in the long-term future (Major League Baseball's Highest-Paid Players For 2018). We pay humans these million dollar salaries in part because human sports and recreation internationally are billion dollar revenue (List of professional sports leagues by income - Wikipedia). It is also because our societies place great value on human talent,

Food / Agricultural—

For tens of thousands of years, humans have lived in harmony with the great Earth and its trillions of other creatures. Over millennia, societies evolved from hunter-based to agricultural, pastoral, industrial, and now post-industrial societies (Society - Wikipedia). Throughout these developments, humans continue to recognize their relationship with the rest of biological life and the planet and continue to work and prosper depending on the larger scale of food, energy, minerals, etc. A major sector in which this has continued has been agriculture and food production, which serves as the backbone of the nations and societies of our world. Although technology has revolutionized crop growing and livestock husbandry several times,

Agriculture has gone from dominating most jobs and tasks in the European and North American economies to a small subset of jobs in post-industrial societies. And automated technology and artificial intelligence have gradually become mainstream in agriculture and farming. Whereas horse-drawn plows or diesel machinery used to till the land and harvest the crops, today GPS and automated systems are doing much more work to enable more safety, efficiency and less environmental impact on agricultural productions (Institute National Food and Nutrition). Farming).

Along with artificial intelligence and automation, we are constantly on the frontiers of numerous other types of technologies as well including genetic and biological engineering. There remains to be seen in the coming decades how genetically modifying foods might often lead to massive scale negative health and environmental impacts. Nonetheless, these technologies promise great potential for providing enough food to sustain rising human populations in the coming decades and even reducing human's ecological imprints in the long term (Genetic engineering - Wikipedia). Imagine, for instance, a day in the coming decades where billions of tons of meat come not from domesticated livestock requiring millions of acres to raise but from in-vitro labs (Lab-Grown Meat Is Coming, Whether You Like It or Not). This might sound negative and have many down-sides if not employed with sustainability and environmentally friendly means. But if done correctly the benefits would be good for humans and countless other species — millions of acres devoted back to natural habitats while billions of tons less in greenhouse gas emissions over decades.

But as technology actually enhances the domains and endeavors of agriculture and food production, globally humans continue to be at the forefront and will be for the millennia to come. After all it is the ever-developing agriculture (not to mention energy and mineral production) that stemmed from human societies to meet the needs of the humans and the technology! Throughout the past several centuries, our global civilization has continued to be a global market of interdependent nations where various nations thrive at growing certain commodities and resources (List of largest producing countries of agricultural commodities - Wikipedia). This does not seem to slow down as our world continues to evolve and develop with technology in all its forms. Quite the contrary, diversification of agriculture globally with the wide range of thousands of plants and animals human societies have grown and raised over millennia with the latest of technology helps to ensure stability in human populations as well as greater environmental and ecosystem health (Diversify agriculture around the world). Not only will diversifying agriculture and technology help the domains of agriculture and food production to be as effective as possible in helping humans achieve greater health (Diversifying agriculture for healthy diets), but it will help to enhance the human endeavors of food production and agriculture while also offering greater opportunities for jobs.

As numerous nations have evolved to post-industrial societies with wide varieties of opportunities to gather needed food and nutrition, the awareness for the perennial organic methods of food production have gone viral. Hundreds of millions of individuals around the world partake in the production of food at individual and group levels (Gardening Popularity - is it Growing or Declining?). Gardening boom: One in 3 US households is now growing food - Farm and Dairy Humans recognizing the cycles of crops and weather along with the unlimited possibilities of plant and animal breeding continue to dominate the global food production scene. And the local farmer's markets and public markets that dominate the economies of nations around the globe will continue to be vital not only for healthy societies (Local Farmers, Global Markets), but to ensure a greater balance and harmony with our larger planet environment of quintillions of other creatures. It seems problematic to think that automation and artificial intelligence will disrupt the balance that has brought ever-developing humans and technology both to this point — not just for agriculture and food production but minerals / resources and energy as well. There is great hope that technology in numerous forms can help to bring the natural balance and harmony between humans and the larger natural world back to sustainability where it in many ways tragically has veered off-course. It seems problematic to think that automation and artificial intelligence will disrupt the balance that has brought ever-developing humans and technology both to this point — not just for agriculture and food production but minerals / resources and energy as well. There is great hope that technology in numerous forms can help to bring the natural balance and harmony between humans and the larger natural world back to sustainability where it in many ways tragically has veered off-course. It seems problematic to think that automation and artificial intelligence will disrupt the balance that has brought ever-developing humans and technology both to this point — not just for agriculture and food production but minerals / resources and energy as well. There is great hope that technology in numerous forms can help to bring the natural balance and harmony between humans and the larger natural world back to sustainability where it in many ways tragically has veered off-course.

And the list goes on:

I have run out of room to talk about other domains, endeavors, or professions where humans (and also beyond humans) have always had a key part will continue to offer humans a key place in the future. Many of these areas yours truly might explore in other Quora answers or just ponder silently or with audiences elsewhere because this is an ever-evolving topic.

It seems that many of these areas will always be up for debate and depend on what future developments in automation and artificial technology may bring. These areas include the countless disciplines of philosophy, ethics, religion and spirituality (indeed it is beyond the scope of this answer to even list how different these are from one another). At what point does the complex automated system you push buttons or yell commands at in the rare times you use your smart device as an actual phone become a living breathing complex soul with a life and infinitely rich being of its own — with worries about children, family, friends, and spiritual fulfillment. This would be the point of technological singularity, which many scientists and philosophers and others believe to be a long way off (Will AI Ever Become Conscious?).

And if artificial intelligence and automation were to reach the point of humans in awareness and intelligence, it is possible that the self-awareness, “existential pangs” of consciousness, and the domains, questions, and even professions central to human societies may not even be relevant to these "other" sentient beings. So, my whole premise to this answer that "human experience of millennia" would surpass any artificial intelligence and the "balance between humans and non-humans" would ensure human relevance in these numerous domains would be completely moot and irrelevant. While humans can never even begin to comprehend what the experience for other quintillions of creatures and beings out there is like (number five of this list is one source for this 10 More Things We Can't Comprehend - Listverse), what we can gather is although other creatures throughout the whole wide world are sentient and even self-aware, they don't seem to usually concern themselves with human pursuits. While all creatures have a certain genetic trait of self-preservation and even instinct to offer love and protection to their fellow creatures, or even capacity for empathy, it is at a different type for humans. As Karen Armstrong, the religious studies scholar quotes: “We are meaning-seeking creatures. Dogs, as far as we know, do not agonize about the canine condition, worry about the plight of dogs in other parts of the world, or try to see their lives from a different perspective. " (https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/770329-we-are-meaning-seeking-creatures-dogs-as-far-as-we-know). Nor do cats or alligators, or fish, or algae blooms or numerous other creatures seek to develop complex scientific models of solar systems, engineer new methods of harnessing natural energy, or analyze the literary devices of a complex sonnet or sonata. These passions of humans do not undermine the complexity and ingenuity of other species (indeed there are domains and activities other creatures do far beyond the capacity of humans), but show human endeavors and domains to be unique. It could be that artificially intelligent beings care less about the sports and recreations humans partake or that the questions of meaning and purpose are for the most part beyond their forte. These passions of humans do not undermine the complexity and ingenuity of other species (indeed there are domains and activities other creatures do far beyond the capacity of humans), but show human endeavors and domains to be unique. It could be that artificially intelligent beings care less about the sports and recreations humans partake or that the questions of meaning and purpose are for the most part beyond their forte. These passions of humans do not undermine the complexity and ingenuity of other species (indeed there are domains and activities other creatures do far beyond the capacity of humans), but show human endeavors and domains to be unique. It could be that artificially intelligent beings care less about the sports and recreations humans partake or that the questions of meaning and purpose are for the most part beyond their forte.

To even ask from a non-human level of autonomy and self-regulation, if technology is to the point of other creatures that have been living, thriving, recreating, interfacing with their larger environment for even billions of years beyond humans is a crucial question . As to date, some of the greatest scientists and innovators have argued that artificial intelligence is still behind even the intelligence of cockroaches and worms, let along mammals and humans (What animals is AI currently smarter than?).

And even the supercomputers of today that can calculate quadrillions of digits per second US once again boasts the world's fastest supercomputer | ZDNet are dwarfed by the majesty of organic life on Earth over billions of years. Just how many supercomputers would it take to calculate the genetic encodings in the tens of trillions of cells in one human, let alone 7.4 billion humans currently making up not even 1 / 10,000th of all the organisms currently on the planet? So it is easy to see that any technology whether artificial intelligence, automation, genetic engineering, etc, is forever going to be dwarfed by the majesty and magnificence of nature.

So back to the premise of this answer to the question specifically to human domains and endeavors, sub-level category is professions, it doesn't seem that technology will lead to a decline in human significance in the domains and endeavors that are valued by human societies for their human touch physically, psychologically, socially, or spiritually nor those areas that show human influence on par with non-human influences. So much of the technological revolutions of the past and present in numerous spheres goes back to humans remembering their precious, small place in the larger whole of infinite beauty, complexity, and wonder of nature. If we remember the perennial wisdom over tens of thousands of years of history, we can use technology to enhance our societies to become ever more sustainable and thriving in harmony with countless ecosystems and other creatures (How modern technology is inspired by the natural world) and even undo much of the damage our evolving societies have done (Conservation technology: can science save endangered species?). Perhaps someday artificially intelligent beings will be a part of that balance, itself also only one part or parcel of the whole infinitely wondrous natural world.

Most likely, some jobs in each category will be automated in some way, but never all jobs at all. Phone operators, for example, will likely exist in some form, even if it's more troubleshooting / call center work than used to be everywhere. Some surgery, some prostitution, some political work, some psychiatry, something ... whatever ... it's already automated. But markets are likely to still exist for humans to provide nearly all services and products specifically designed in one way or another for the wealthy, if no one else.

Second point: it is never a long time. It is po

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Most likely, some jobs in each category will be automated in some way, but never all jobs at all. Phone operators, for example, will likely exist in some form, even if it's more troubleshooting / call center work than used to be everywhere. Some surgery, some prostitution, some political work, some psychiatry, something ... whatever ... it's already automated. But markets are likely to still exist for humans to provide nearly all services and products specifically designed in one way or another for the wealthy, if no one else.

Second point - never is a very long time. It is possible to imagine machines with the capability to diagnose and treat almost every human condition, for instance. It would depend on the nature of medical advances. If, for instance, a failing heart could be replaced by some sort of grown-heart in its place or you could cause an ailing heart to repair itself… then heart surgery… or any other organ surgery becomes unnecessary, so, although not automated in its present form, it is just as obsolete and eliminated. If we could do that within the body, clearly we could do that for plumbing somehow as well.

The more practical question is' If I'm 20 and expect to work until I'm 60 or 70, what are likely to be the most numerous jobs I could count on being available to me over those 40 to 50 years of my working lifetime ? ' This becomes complicated by the training requirements, which could change a lot (maybe no point in studying typing if we move all toward voice controlled systems), your interests (since there's no point knowing if deep sea diving jobs are in that group if you fear the water) and only then look at potentially unexpected changes in automation of work. Generally today if you are considering various career options it's possible to research which of them might disappear or grow. There are lots of surveys, etc.,

The real key is to keep learning (and directing your learning to emerging new channels) so that you are ready to move to a new open area if things start to dry out on your previous choices.

In short, jobs that require trust, empathy or human responsibility. Period. But there are many more than you might think: real estate agent, funeral planner, sommeliers, interior designers, fashion moguls, and yes, human resources.

It turns out that machines are better than us at many things. One thing they're not good at yet: gaining confidence, having empathy, and taking responsibility.

If a computer algorithm fails and causes a plane to crash, people are looking for someone to blame. Someone wrote that algorithm. Someone merged that code and approved it for use on the plane. Someone's security monitor

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In short, jobs that require trust, empathy or human responsibility. Period. But there are many more than you might think: real estate agent, funeral planner, sommeliers, interior designers, fashion moguls, and yes, human resources.

It turns out that machines are better than us at many things. One thing they're not good at yet: gaining confidence, having empathy, and taking responsibility.

If a computer algorithm fails and causes a plane to crash, people look for someone to blame. Someone wrote that algorithm. Someone merged that code and approved it for use in the plane. Someone's safety monitoring didn't work.

If you stub your toe, often people look for someone to blame. It's a natural reaction when something bad happens. Computers are pretty bad at this. They can't apologize because they don't feel.

THE ULTIMATE DESIRE: CONNECTION

Humans are social creatures. We crave connection. It's why even though you can probably get a better challenge playing with AI's in video games, multi-player is SIGNIFICANTLY more popular. People like to trash talk. People like to chat. People like to feel like their actions have a purpose.

AI takes that away — if you know it's AI. As a result, people don't trust it. It can't react, it can't empathize.

This is why Stitch Fix lets you talk to a designer, even though some (and over time, a lot) of the suggestions come from an algorithm.

This is why Red Fin gives you a real estate broker when you buy a house.

This is why Travel Agents are making a come back, although with lower wages. 1

CAN YOU PREDICT THE FUTURE?

Another place where people want people is in leadership. At least for now, in an uncertain world, leaders look forward and make bets. They take responsibility if they're wrong. They try to inspire people that they're right.

In particular with tastemakers (entertainment, art, etc.) someone needs to have a vision for what people are going to want and try to convince them.

Most convincing wins.

Absolutely popularity algorithms can reinforce this (have you seen some of the most popular videos on YouTube?), But so far, most of the videos are manmade.

As with YouTube, so with leadership of companies, and basically anything that requires predicting the future.

DO YOU NEED THAT THROAT TO CHOKE?

Much of our world IS automated. But that life is hell. Ultimately, you call your bank for something routine. They route it 50% of the time. But why is customer service SO hellish?

Because you want someone to solve YOUR issue. Reality has a surprising amount of detail. 2 Please read that footnote.

Even by writing, you create something that has never existed before in history. 3

When something goes wrong, you're going to want a human.

JOBS THAT WILL STAND THE TEST OF TIME

I believe jobs that require these three things will ultimately stand the test of time, so I stand by my examples list:

  • Doctors
  • Real Estate Agents
  • Sommeliers (you want social approval to impress your date that it really was a 'fantastic choice' of wine)
  • Fashion Moguls - (someone needs to inspire you)
  • Product Managers / Management Consultants (they have to look to the future)
  • Funeral / wedding planners
  • ..and more

If people want additional examples, happy to provide them.

Happy work!

Footnotes

1 As users tire of the Internet, the humble travel agent returns 2 Reality has a surprising amount of detail 3 What are the chances that you have written an original sentence that has never been before? written?

Surgeons, carpenters and plumbers. These jobs are highly improvised. It is not something a robot is very good at unless it is tremendously skilled, and it is not an easy thing to teach an AI. I mean jazz musicians too, only computers are starting to compose music that isn't horrible, and you don't need anything more than a speaker to make the music come out.

Hookers (WestWorld notwithstanding), because I suspect that most human beings would rather fuck another human being. However, we now have remote control dildos. Heard it's for the best after being there.

Maids and butlers, because

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Surgeons, carpenters and plumbers. These jobs are highly improvised. It is not something a robot is very good at unless it is tremendously skilled, and it is not an easy thing to teach an AI. I mean jazz musicians too, only computers are starting to compose music that isn't horrible, and you don't need anything more than a speaker to make the music come out.

Hookers (WestWorld notwithstanding), because I suspect that most human beings would rather fuck another human being. However, we now have remote control dildos. Heard it's for the best after being there.

Maids and butlers, because the whole point is to have a human servant. I think personal service is going to make a big comeback once computers and robots really begin to take over jobs. Not that housecleaning isn’t something a robot could do effectively for the common masses. It’s the snob-appeal of having a human servant, when you could have a robot.

Contrary to what has been said, I think most jobs can be replaced by robots. Robots that sweep the streets, collect garbage, take care of children is totally possible.
In fact, it already exists. On my street, the garbage truck, when they come and collect, it just stops next to the containers, and then it is a big mechanical arm that unfolds, grabs the containers one after the other and dumps the contents into the container of the truck. . No man ever gets out of the truck.
I've seen machines cleaning the streets. They are tiny trucks driven by a man.
They still don't look like the robots from the movie "I robot" b

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Unlike what has been said, I think very most jobs can be replaced by robots. Robots that would sweep the streets, pick up the garbage, look after the children is totally possible.
Actually it does already exist. On my street, the garbage truck, when they come and collect, just stops next to the bins, and then it is a big mechanical arm that deploys, grabs the bins one after another and dumps the content into the truck bin. No man ever comes off the truck.
I have seen machine cleaning the streets. They are tiny trucks driven by a man.
They don't yet look like the robots in the movie "I robot" but it's a matter of time. Self driving cars are a reality already.
It's possible to look after children remotely. With the right intelligence and sensors, it is entirely possible to imagine autonomous robots looking after children.
I believe even surgery could be done by autonomous robots. Remote surgery already exists with the help of machines.

There is only one thing that no machine could replace humans for. It is art.
I just don't see how any machine could do art.
Technically, a robot could easily beat any human at most sports. But the fact the participant is not human would disqualify him from a competition. So I could also add sport on top of art.

A menos que seas un artista talentoso, la pregunta correcta que debes hacerte no es qué trabajo puedo hacer que ninguna máquina reemplazaría, sino más bien: ¿cómo me las arreglo para adaptarme en este mundo en constante cambio para no volverme obsoleto?

Niñera.


Todos los padres querrán salir por la noche. El cuidado de niños como un trabajo de tiempo completo a largo plazo puede no existir, pero definitivamente no desaparecerá como un servicio.

El cuidado de niños puede desaparecer como un trabajo de tiempo completo / medio tiempo y ser relegado a un trabajo de vez en cuando si la sociedad se vuelve próspera en general. Si hay suficiente tiempo libre para tener amigos y familiares que cuiden a los niños en lugar de alguien de alquiler. Pero aún así, no todo el mundo en todo momento tendrá una red en la que confiar.

In this type of child care, it is not about education, love, bonding or CPR. the purpose is to go out at night with your spouse.

P

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Baby sister.


All parents will want to go out at night. Childcare as a long-term full-time job may not exist, but it will definitely not disappear as a service.

Childcare can disappear as a full-time / part-time job and be relegated to a job every now and then if the society becomes generally prosperous. If there is enough free time to have friends and family to babysit instead of someone for hire. But still, not everyone at all times will have a network to trust.

In this type of child care, it is not about education, love, bonding or CPR. the purpose is to go out at night with your spouse.

Plus, if a babysitter isn't goign to give meaningful interaction, then who is? The parents? The whole point of hiring a babysitter in this case (which will always remain until eternity) is for the parents to go have a night out. Having a night out doesn't mean the parents aren't giving the kid meaningful interaction over the long run.

What you have to compare babysitting to is the alternative of putting your baby in the care of a machine or robot. Ethics, meaningful interaction is an irrelevant point as far as the demand and paid job of babysitting is concerned.

I don't agree with your supposition that “some jobs” will be safe from automation.

Advances in artificial intelligence and machine learning are advancing at a dizzying pace. Watson, IBM's supercomputer, has beaten the world chess champions. AI has the ability to create chatbots that communicate with each other.

Elon Musk, Nik Bostrom at Oxford, Stephen Hawking at Cambridge… all believe that the number one danger facing humanity is that we are rapidly approaching the point where an AI-created clone will "decide" that Homo sapien is obsolete.

Simulation theory believes that we are a computer simulation created

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I disagree with your assumption that "some jobs" will be safe from automation.

Advances in artificial intelligence and machine learning are advancing at a dizzying pace. Watson, IBM's supercomputer, has beaten the world chess champions. AI has the ability to create chatbots that communicate with each other.

Elon Musk, Nik Bostrom at Oxford, Stephen Hawking at Cambridge… all believe that the number one danger facing humanity is that we are rapidly approaching the point where an AI-created clone will "decide" that Homo sapien is obsolete.

Simulation theory believes that we are a computer simulation created by our very distant ancestors.

Entonces, ¿todavía cree que “algunos trabajos” serán seguros?

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