With 6 million job openings in the US, why do people complain that there are no jobs available?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Charles John



With 6 million job openings in the US, why do people complain that there are no jobs available?

Honestly, I'd like to know too. So if you could…. ask all the employers I've been applying to. I'd like to know why they don't hire me. Because I call a work surplus nonsense. Empirical evidence shows that these jobs are on paper somewhere and not in the real world. Made up numbers put up to perpetuate federal subsidies and such.

Because despite all this talk that there are millions of jobs ... why can't I get a good one?

What do I determine is a good job? Well…. I have given up having full time anywhere, because it benefits the employer to hire mul

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Honestly, I'd like to know too. So if you could…. ask all the employers I've been applying to. I'd like to know why they don't hire me. Because I call a work surplus nonsense. Empirical evidence shows that these jobs are on paper somewhere and not in the real world. Made up numbers put up to perpetuate federal subsidies and such.

Because despite all this talk that there are millions of jobs ... why can't I get a good one?

What do I determine is a good job? Well…. I have given up working full-time anywhere, because it benefits the employer to hire multiple part-time workers rather than one full-time. There was a time when this was not so ... but now it is. Employee loyalty is a thing of the past. Most employers seem to work under the impression that there is always another desperate and hungry employee that they can exploit until they quit, waiting around the corner.

I work for a national retail chain. There was a time when employees who were running the business or doing great work were rewarded with real cash bonuses. Your checks would be a little bigger. They don't do that anymore. Now, they award "Stars". We even have small-use credit cards that are worth 20 or 50 stars that we can hand out because we did a good job. We can spend those stars on a specific website, to buy the products they offer.

We are taxed (state and federal) on the stars as if they were worth $ 0.25 each. It's okay. Each star is worth a quarter. If you use that math and calculate the prices of things on the site ... well, let me explain it to you this way. On the site, the Sandisk 64GB 3.0 drive is 162 points. That's $ 40 if each star is a quarter, and the government treats me like it is. On our actual store website, we sell the exact same flash drive for $ 30 when it's not on sale… which is almost every other week.

So ... just to explain it clearly ... my employer tells me how well I did the job, giving me fake money that I can only use to buy products that my customers pay less money for. How is this supposed to provide an incentive to keep doing a good job? Hey, Shane. Thanks for getting that big sale. As a reward, I will allow you to overpay for some of the same things that you sell to your customers.

Not to mention the constant harassment that we are supposed to make every customer's experience longer at check-in. We are required to sell multiple products at the register when people have finished shopping, regardless of how much line we have waiting to pay. Open another record? I can not do this. EACH STORE has reductions in the number of employees on the payroll. Each store now has fewer people on the floor (if there are any). We have days where there is a manager on duty (which means there are no breaks for that manager for the entire day). We have days where we have that manager, a teller, and two other employees, one at the tech bank and one at the copy center. And that is. Computers difficult to repair, when you have to be the person on the floor. They don't want us to repair computers though ... our repair prices have been artificially inflated to the point where customers are supposed to be encouraged to buy new ones. Then there are all the other things that we are supposed to add to the sale.

People come up with $ 200 to fix their computer, because they have kids, bills, and car payments ... and we're constantly cajoled into making this customer think they need to buy a new computer, rather than just replacing the hard drive in their three . one year notebook. Then another $ 250 to power it up and install an AV suite (and give them free cleanings for a year). Then another $ 200 or more for the additional year of warranty. They came with obligations and $ 200 that they could spend, and we are supposed to make them feel like they need to spend $ 400 on the computer, with $ 450 or more on top…. $ 850. And keep them until they think it's a good idea. They trust us and we trick them into selling them what they don't really need.

And that's the job I have now. Part time. And if I don't sell, I don't get hours. It's hard to pay rent when you get $ 10 an hour, 8 hours a week, because you are morally opposed to making people feel guilty and lying to them so they spend four to five times what they can afford, so They can not pay. need. Oh ... and get shit like a pat on the back if you get it.

And yes, I am in a position to say that they do not need it. I know what they bring to repair and I know what they are buying. I know what it takes to get your machine back up and running, and I know what it's supposed to cost.

6 million jobs? Shit. Employers are being shit to their employees and are NOT hiring for the positions, because they can squeeze the employees they have until there is nothing left.

But here is this. What does it matter if you have two jobs, when you STILL don't earn enough money between them to pay the minimum you need to keep working?

I heard that about the residents of Appalachia in my native Kentucky. By the way, they are overwhelmingly white, but they rarely figure in the thinking of anyone who refers to all poor people as "welfare scammers" and "tricksters."

As someone who has moved multiple times, let me explain step by step:

What if you are not qualified for one of the open jobs? When you left school to go to work in the mines, the mining company didn't care that you hadn't finished high school. Back then, he never expected that coal mining would one day be a dying industry. Unfortunately it's all you know

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I heard that about the residents of Appalachia in my native Kentucky. By the way, they are overwhelmingly white, but they rarely figure in the thinking of anyone who refers to all poor people as "welfare scammers" and "tricksters."

As someone who has moved multiple times, let me explain step by step:

What if you are not qualified for one of the open jobs? When you left school to go to work in the mines, the mining company didn't care that you hadn't finished high school. Back then, he never expected that coal mining would one day be a dying industry. Unfortunately, it is all you can do.

If you're working now, it's probably at a Walmart, one of the few places you're hiring. But since his work schedule is on call, you never know how many hours he will work from week to week. You may want to train for one of those open jobs, but with what you earn at Walmart, you can't afford tuition at your community college. So you have to take out a student loan, getting into even more debt. And because of your on-call schedule, you may end up missing so many classes that you drop out. You now have a student loan that you couldn't use, but are still responsible for.

If work is not where you live, you have to sell your house. But if you live in an economically depressed area, there are likely many more homes for sale than there are buyers. If you walk away from your home and let the bank foreclose, your credit will be ruined. If you try to keep payments while looking for a buyer, you quickly go broke.

(You probably live in an economically depressed area if you are unemployed. In the words of Mel Brooks, a recession is when your neighbor loses his job, a depression is when you lose yours).

By some miracle, fifty miles away there is an opening for a job for which you are qualified. So schedule an interview. But because you have put off essential maintenance on your car due to lack of money, you need to find a ride. At the last minute, his vehicle doesn't show up, so he desperately climbs into his car and prays that it will hold its own for the fifty miles. But even if you do, you will be late for the interview, which is the kiss of death for job seekers.

To save money, he skipped lunch, making his stomach growl audibly as the receptionist tells him that the staff manager stopped waiting for him and left. Your lunch money barely covers the cost of two gallons of gas, so the car comes home, but only on gas.

So, somehow, you finally take a break and have gotten a job. The bad news: You're in Pikeville, Ky., And work is 140 miles away in Lexington. He cannot travel, so he must find a place in Lexington to live. Since you have not yet sold your house in Pikeville, you will have to rent it out. That means paying a security deposit and first month's rent in advance. If it is not furnished, you will have to buy the minimum of furniture, a bed, a table and a chair.

The relocation process alone can cost you a couple of thousand dollars before you've even cashed your first paycheck. If you can get your hands on so much money, why do you need to leave Pikeville?

Then there is always the possibility that the job offer will be rescinded for some reason other than your fault, for example, the charming boss in the interview turns out to be a world-class jerk in the workplace and fires you because you don't like. your tattoos. So you end up back in Pikeville, still unemployed and financially worse than ever.

I am not a Trump supporter.

As an American, can we have a real conversation about this? Some of the incidents below are from people I know or from personal experiences or observations.


I look at advertisements from an administrative assistant or office manager in California for businesses or institutions that, on paper, are politically "progressive."

The requirements they want: a bachelor's or associate's degree (I have a bachelor's degree, but why the heck would it be a requirement if you follow what follows?); someone with accounting experience; to maintain finances; coordinate meetings with professors (I'm talking to you, universities

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I am not a Trump supporter.

As an American, can we have a real conversation about this? Some of the incidents below are from people I know or from personal experiences or observations.


I look at advertisements from an administrative assistant or office manager in California for businesses or institutions that, on paper, are politically "progressive."

The requirements they want: a bachelor's or associate's degree (I have a bachelor's degree, but why the heck would it be a requirement if you follow what follows?); someone with accounting experience; to maintain finances; coordinate meetings with teachers (I speak to you, schools); maintain your website (that's what a certified and professionally trained webmaster is for, hi); and coordinate travel arrangements for executives.

And for this plum position they offer $ 14 an hour.

In / near Silicon Valley, California.

You cannot be serious. With housing and other basic expenses; How can anyone survive with that?


Let's talk about the adjunct system in American universities today. These people educate our people, but they are so poorly paid that some of them are on food stamps to survive.


The internship system. If you want to step foot in the door of a company, you have to agree to work without pay. Let me say it again. I do not pay. In practical terms, it means that only people who already have some income can afford the privilege of working for them. The poor, regardless of how talented or hardworking they are or the potential they have, do not need to apply.


Here's a new one: Try to get a job if you've been unemployed for some time before. As if that somehow disqualifies a person. Some potential employers specify that there are no job breaks for your consideration. Honestly, why would it be a factor? Shouldn't a potential employer ask why and make a decision based on the answer?


I was temporary in New York for a time many years ago. Overall it was a good experience and I learned a lot. I would work for various firms for about two weeks or a month or so to replace someone who was on leave (maybe pregnant) or looking for a new permanent hire. At a somewhat prestigious law firm, the partners and the office manager liked my job and informally asked me if I wanted to work there permanently. I was happy about it; my employer would receive a high rate, we would all do some paperwork and I would have a permanent job. Later, one of the partners told me that they had no problem with their original employee, except that she was pregnant,

Legally, they couldn't fire the former employee for being pregnant and taking compulsory leave. However, they managed to find some reason. And there I was. Later, one of the law firm's partners hinted at what they had done. I felt disgusted and embarrassed. I resigned a month later.


I like to think that I am a loyal person. Even if I don't particularly like a particular job, I will give it 100%. But I have felt so bad in some situations. I think many Americans feel that way. And hearing the experiences of others is even worse for minorities or ex-cons.

I also wonder that.

This is the line that blacks have had to listen to for years, because our unemployment rates have always been roughly double that of whites. Downtown blacks, in particular, have had this problem for decades with regards to employment.

We have always been told that to reduce the unemployment rate, we must be willing to train for new jobs. Be willing to move to a new location. Stay in school and get a college degree. Be willing to work any available job for any salary. Start your own business.

And the welfare / social policy in this country for decades was manufactured with that

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I also wonder that.

This is the line that blacks have had to listen to for years, because our unemployment rates have always been roughly double that of whites. Downtown blacks, in particular, have had this problem for decades with regards to employment.

We have always been told that to reduce the unemployment rate, we must be willing to train for new jobs. Be willing to move to a new location. Stay in school and get a college degree. Be willing to work any available job for any salary. Start your own business.

And the social and welfare policy in this country for decades was manufactured with that kind of attitude. Get those lazy people who existed in wellness for generations to get up and get out of it. Because if you're on welfare, it's your fault.

But now, when whites are faced with the same thing, in some way, those attitudes and guides to a better life that blacks have had to hear about for decades no longer seem to apply. Is now..

  • We are not qualified for those jobs.
  • Where are we supposed to get the money to go back to school?
  • I am too old to qualify for a new job / is there age discrimination even if I have experience or training (Wait ... Really? Is there discrimination? And is it actually bad enough to prevent you from succeeding? Who knew? Wow.)
  • HARD to move out of area / too expensive. It's our home anyway, why should we?
  • Have sympathy and understanding. It is not easy for a coal miner to suddenly abandon something his father and grandfather did.
  • Immigrants are taking our jobs. Forget the reality that these rural people will not work for less than the minimum wage as immigrants are willing to do; Let's blame the people who are willing to do it.
  • Those jobs are boring / not what I was trained for / I don't earn as much as I did before the factories relocated.

And somehow, these excuses are valid now. The sympathy for the unemployed coal miner or jobless factory employee is just overwhelming, and if you dare to suggest that maybe these people with these problems aren't trying or that they are something less than hard-working, you will get all kinds of setbacks. Witness the trash that Clinton took when she claimed that coal jobs are not coming back and the people who lost those jobs will need to be retrained. But when downtown black people raised these issues, somehow it didn't matter, they were out of work because they didn't try hard enough to find work.

Well, Trump supporters ... what made you change your mind? How is YOUR situation different from what black people have had to deal with for decades? Why does YOUR difficulty deserve more of a solution or more sympathy / empathy? How come blacks don't try hard enough, but you're doing it?

Inquiring minds want to know.

It says 6 million job openings, but it doesn't say, and you may not understand, how many people are NOT working. They may want to apply for just 5.9 million jobs. We'll see.

Every year, around 3 million new people enter the job market. So your June 228,000 is not even enough vacancies for new people to work only, much less for those who are not working and those who want to work.

The BLS says there are about 95 million that are NOT working. This does not include seasonal work, farm work, small business work, and others. I say there is more than that number that is NOT working right now.

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It says 6 million job openings, but it doesn't say, and you may not understand, how many people are NOT working. They may want to apply for just 5.9 million jobs. We'll see.

Every year, around 3 million new people enter the job market. So your June 228,000 is not even enough vacancies for new people to work only, much less for those who are not working and those who want to work.

The BLS says there are about 95 million that are NOT working. This does not include seasonal work, farm work, small business work, and others. I say there is more than that number that is NOT working right now. A new report shows that between 2010 and 2014, half of the small businesses in the United States have failed. That's not a good sign for the status quo, as most new jobs come from small businesses as they grow. Its 5.9 million job openings are not enough to make a dent in the 95 million who are NOT working and the 3 million new people each year.

Full-time work has now been reduced to 34 hours a week. I think that means a lot of people are underemployed. 6/34 is 17.6 percent. So these people should work 17.6 more hours with 17.6 more salary. So I see 157 million people in this situation, NOT working those 6 hours per week to bring it to 40 hours per week.

For those between 34 hours and 1 hour per week, there are also around 20 million part-time workers. I say that these people are seriously underemployed. If you complain about the 6 million job openings, I have to ask, “How many of them are part-time or less than 40 hours? So, of those, how many will not cover the needs of a family that makes ends meet with a certain salary? Which is easier to say, "There are no such jobs," or to lose the home that your family depends on? Or lose the car you need to get to work? Or lose some other valuable thing that one wants to have?

I say that the United States could easily be working twice as many hours as it does now. Half of the productive capacity of the US economy is wasted. (See the report on the 50% loss of small businesses we had between 2010 and 2014). And at the same time, some boast how low those who have been unemployed for just 4 weeks compare to before. Wow! This is a total disconnect from the reality that the United States faces.

Let me guess, aren't you a Trump supporter? Why?

The problem with your question is that, like many things the media portrays with Trump (and other candidates, but particularly Trump), the most important point is completely missing. And it assumes that Trump supporters are jobless and that is why they are supporting Trump.

Our country and our economy are too complex to summarize these challenges in a DOL report on jobs and then simply ask, "Well, why can't people learn new skills and / or get around?" Of course, some people can, and others can't, for a variety of reasons. But that's beside the point.

Our economy is a sum of many e

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The problem with your question is that, like many things the media portrays with Trump (and other candidates, but particularly Trump), the most important point is completely missing. And it assumes that Trump supporters are jobless and that is why they are supporting Trump.

Our country and our economy are too complex to summarize these challenges in a DOL report on jobs and then simply ask, "Well, why can't people learn new skills and / or get around?" Of course, some people can, and others can't, for a variety of reasons. But that's beside the point.

Our economy is a sum of many ecosystems. Auto manufacturing jobs have been on the decline for years in Detroit; but they are increasing in other parts of the country. Why? There can be a number of reasons, some of which may change through policy.

Let's take GE moving from CT to MA. Why did they do it? Because CT is a hostile business state with high corporate taxes (and now they are looking for income from donations from private universities ... but I digress ...). GE held out as long as it could, but eventually CT state legislators kicked out so many other companies that an increasing burden fell on those who stayed. MA has a booming economy (one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country) and an innovation zone in the port district that is ideally located (in terms of amenities, but also with proximity to universities such as Harvard, Tufts, Babson and MIT and many others). They lured GE in with a clever combination of marketing, low taxes, and employee-friendly terms. No wonder GE moved.

What to do with all the CT employees who were offered or not asked to relocate? Some may move and find another career in another state and city. Others will stay put. But this is not what Trump supporters are lamenting about.

The US economy is and has been in recent decades moving away from a manufacturing-based economy to a service-based economy. Technology has helped accelerate some of that change. The many areas of our country that relied on manufacturing to provide solid income bases for state and local governments and jobs and security for families have, in some cases, disappeared. Some people blame Mexico or bad trade deals that kicked out cheap foreign jobs or labor (Trump-ites) and some people blame greedy big corporations who just want to make money and will kill anyone in sight if need be. to do it. (Clinton-ites).

Trump promises that he can restore those jobs of the past and create jobs for the present. To put it mildly, you've been a bit short on the details, but you're tackling the subject in broader terms: bad trade deals negotiated and supported by politicians who have destroyed people's ability to earn a living and don't care, an attitude. hostile. business regulatory environment and a tax framework that does not create incentives for companies to invest in the US.

Trump supporters aren't just complaining about jobs. They complain about the ecosystems of their lives. They use jobs as an aspect of a society that they see as corrupt and it doesn't work for them. They don't see free public college tuition, equal pay for women, nuclear deals with Iran, and politicians who get rich through the public as solutions to their problems.

A couple of reasons.

First of all, talking about 6 million jobs is very misleading. It is not so much a measure of business demand as a simple billing. Every day people quit their jobs, resign, get fired or retire. But those who quit, quit or are fired need to find other jobs. If you have the same number of people who leave their jobs and go to work each year, then the unemployment rate will remain exactly the same. The only way an unemployed person can get a job is to get one before someone else and cast them into the unemployed group.

That is the difference between

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A couple of reasons.

First of all, talking about 6 million jobs is very misleading. It is not so much a measure of business demand as a simple billing. Every day people quit their jobs, resign, get fired or retire. But those who quit, quit or are fired need to find other jobs. If you have the same number of people who leave their jobs and go to work each year, then the unemployment rate will remain exactly the same. The only way an unemployed person can get a job is to get one before someone else and cast them into the unemployed group.

That is the difference between personal responsibility and social responsibility that I notice that people lack a lot. If a person is unemployed, they may be able to get a job if they try hard enough. But if 8% of the country is unemployed, pushing harder will not change the situation. Someone will be out of work, and all they have done is trade from an employed person to an unemployed person.

But, there are still jobs that are in chronic demand, so why don't the unemployed fill them? Quite simply, because an unemployed 50-year-old assembly line worker in Detroit can't fill a Java coding position in Palo Alto. There are huge geographic gaps in the American job market. Young, single people with some inexpensive mattresses can outgrow them. If you're middle-aged, you have family obligations, two kids in high school, and a house you've lived in for twenty years and now you can't sell, pick up, and move to a place you've never been isn't. almost as simple. That's especially true when you have little or no savings and don't have a job on hand when you move.

Then there is the skills gap. If you're young and ambitious, you may be able to go to school on your own, spend several years training, hope your education is still relevant when you get out, and start applying for jobs. But if you don't have the years and money to spare, what are you going to do?

Simply put, the job market is not as simple as getting in and out of a job. There are serious barriers to entering many professions. And the people who need jobs the most are often the people who can get through them the least.

What can you do about it? There are no simple solutions. I don't have the answer and I guarantee you Trump doesn't. But he says he will fix it. For some desperate people, that's the best hope they can find.

  1. Many Trump supporters are already in paid employment. I think the data shows that racism is a better indicator of their support than economic hardship. Don't let the media tell you otherwise.
  2. For those who are not, they need to look at where they are geographically located and where the jobs are.
  3. You should also look at the skill sets of some of these people and determine if those skills fit the job openings.

He is looking for rational facts with which he can prove a Trump supporter wrong in his ways. Too often we are reminded to assume that rational agency is wrong. An author re

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  1. Many Trump supporters are already in paid employment. I think the data shows that racism is a better indicator of their support than economic hardship. Don't let the media tell you otherwise.
  2. For those who are not, they need to look at where they are geographically located and where the jobs are.
  3. You should also look at the skill sets of some of these people and determine if those skills fit the job openings.

He is looking for rational facts with which he can prove a Trump supporter wrong in his ways. Too often we are reminded to assume that rational agency is wrong. An author recently wrote a book on Trump supporters. She said they are living in a "deep story" (anyone familiar with the Landmark series of self-help classes will recognize this simply as their "Story"). The stories have some facts and some emotions. These two things combine in various ways and on various levels to build "truth." Newt Gingrich said the same thing a few weeks ago when he told a reporter that she could save her data and that he would keep the emotions.

This should concern us all. This is how every fascist movement begins. And you can't make people see any truth other than your own, no matter how many objective facts you give them. We all live in Stories to some degree. But the left tends to value hyper-rationalism that allows people to change their minds as new facts are presented (which is why we are constantly testing this tactic with the right).

There are only two ways to counter this situation:

  1. You let them take over, execute their ideas, fail as you know they will, and let their own weight crush them out of their trance. One could argue that this was something like what happened with the Soviet Union (I'm very generalizing). Its command economy was not sustainable and collapsed on its own ('ish). I'm sure there are better examples (maybe the public sentiment around the Iraq war is better). This would be the opposite of Republican filibuster. Republicans block Democratic plans, for the most part, because they fear that the public will be hooked on a service that works too well and therefore will be politically impossible to undo. I don't think that those of us on the left should have the same fear of republican ideas.
  2. It crushes them politically. Just keep voting. Make sure no judge sympathizes with their beliefs. You block them and wait for the demographics to run its course.

Personally, the number 1 attracts me. But I am afraid it also implicitly assumes rational agency. And the danger is that you end up with a North Korea where the propaganda machine and political machines become so powerful that people never break their spell ... which brings you back to number 2, but this time through more violent media.

HTH

The obvious answer is that the obstacles are:

  • Jobs in the wrong place. Not all people are ready to move anywhere.
  • Housing in places with a good job market tends to have high house prices or even unhealthy house prices. Going from a low-value home to a lush home will cost a lot of cash.
  • Education. New jobs tend to demand a new education. People who are mostly unemployed are not the best educated.
  • Age. Hiring an older person is not desirable.

What you miss is the heart of the problem: the social contract. People have been told: Do this and don't do that AND you will get this and avoid

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The obvious answer is that the obstacles are:

  • Jobs in the wrong place. Not all people are ready to move anywhere.
  • Housing in places with a good job market tends to have high house prices or even unhealthy house prices. Going from a low-value home to a lush home will cost a lot of cash.
  • Education. New jobs tend to demand a new education. People who are mostly unemployed are not the best educated.
  • Age. Hiring an older person is not desirable.

What you miss is the heart of the problem: the social contract. People have been told: Do this and don't do that AND you will get this and avoid it. This raises expectations:

  • If I don't commit a crime, I'll stay out of jail.
  • If I pay taxes the state will spend them on poor people. (And if I get poor the state will take care of me)
  • If I work in the coal mine I will be building a better future for my children
  • If I go to collage I will have an attractive job
  • AND SO ON

When a social contract is broken people will be angry. They feel dissapointed and betrayed. The situation will call for a scapegoat. Someone to blame.

In the Arab world it is Israel and USA who are the scapegoat. Why are we poor? Why are our societies corrupt? ANSWER: A jewish conspiracy performed by USA.

In Europe it is immigrants.ANSWER: If we just not had to feed all the immigrants we would be fine. Just remember how peacefull our societies used to be.

In the US, Trump claims THE ELITHE has betrayed the US He will change course. The jobs are coming back. The property will return. It is not clear exactly how.

Let's stop hating those who voted for Trump first.

Let's try to understand them for once.

And before continuing, I was and continue to be anti-Trump.

Going back to my original point, imagine that you have worked in the same field, say a software engineer, for decades. You made a lot of money and you lived a good life. You had a family, three little ones, one of whom was growling and running on all fours. You had a house, you and your spouse had chosen the furniture and painted the rooms. You had a car to get to work and a minivan for the soccer dad / mom.

You were getting close to fifty, you started wo

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Let's stop hating those who voted for Trump first.

Let's try to understand them for once.

And before continuing, I was and continue to be anti-Trump.

Going back to my original point, imagine that you have worked in the same field, say a software engineer, for decades. You made a lot of money and you lived a good life. You had a family, three little ones, one of whom was growling and running on all fours. You had a house, you and your spouse had chosen the furniture and painted the rooms. You had a car to get to work and a minivan for the soccer dad / mom.

You were approaching your fifties, you started to worry about your children's college fund in a few years. But it's ok, your six figure salary can still support them despite the tuition hikes. You might have to take one over sea vacation a year instead of two now.

That's when the layoff started. You weren't too concerned at first, after all, you were confident in finding another job with your experience. But as your last day coming closer, you had no new offers on hand. Because somehow programming is no longer needed. Every company is looking for artist instead. Well, not every company, a head hunter informed you there are still plenty need of software engineers in a different state.

So you have two choices, go back to school and learn art, or relocate.

You don't really want to go back to school, you weren't good at art before, why would you be good at it now? Even if you did go get trained, there's still no guarantee you'll get a job, because it seemed that's what everyone's doing too. Plus, who knows how long this art fever will last.

Your other option is to relocate. You weren't against that at first, until your teenage daughter started bawling her eyes out because that meant she had to give up her friends (ahem, boyfriend), not to mention adjusting to a new environment could impact her grade, and she really needed to keep her 4.0s and honor classes for one more year before she can started applying to harvard. Your son wasn't happy with the potential move either. See, he had been doing good with his baseball club, with any luck he might become the captain next fall, and his school was on a winning streak.

Your spouse was worried about if you could sell the house in a decent price, the housing market in the area had been going down. That reminded you to look up the housing cost in the new town. Woah, it's not cheap! Well, you could still afford it if you forego all vacations and willing to settle for a smaller house. But wait, it looked like the commute would be twice as long, you would have less time to spend with your family, poor moochie would have to take a shorter walk.

You talked to your parents about relocation, they were sad to see their children and grandchildren move away, but they understood, as long as you promised to visit often, and they let out a sigh: we will have to miss out on little Jen's next birthday.

That's when it hits you. Relocation is not as simple as packing up and move, you are also losing family and friends. You will be completely alone in an unfamiliar place, you won't know where the nearest ER is when your daughter breaks her wrist while skating, you won't know which vet to go to when moochie ate something he shouldn't. You won't have anyone to call to house sit as you visit your inlaws during the holidays.

And worst of all, you don't know if that job will even last. What if that company goes out in a year, then what? You'll have nobody close to you to help out.

It's a scary thought.

I had a very interesting discussion a while back with a few friends in HR. It was about their hiring practices.

If you visit the website of any company that employs a decent number of people, you will see a lot of very old listings. I'm talking about listings that are a month or two old, for jobs that have a good salary and don't require much. That list is a job offer, but it's been open for two months. How can it be?

Well, some companies, especially large ones, will post jobs that will eventually prove unnecessary or in no rush to fill. Many of these jobs are

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I had a very interesting discussion a while ago with some friends in HR. It was about their hiring practices.

If you visit the website of any company that employs a decent number of people, you will see a lot of very old listings. I'm talking about listings that are a month or two old, for jobs that have a good salary and don't require much. That list is a job offer, but it's been open for two months. How can it be?

Well, some businesses, especially large ones, will post jobs that eventually turn out to not be needed, or that they're not in any hurry to fill. A lot of these jobs are things that you can do with pretty much any college degree, for example, but they're not filled. It's not because they don't get a lot of applicants; these guys I was talking with work for a Fortune 500 company that basically has to beat applicants off with a stick. It's not that these applicants aren't qualified, even in cases where (like this business) they are subjected to personality tests and the like. The fact is that the business has looked at their NEED for someone to fill that position, and found that at this time, they don't NEED someone there. Maybe the duties have been absorbed by someone else. Maybe they've exported the job, filled it with a contractor or a freelancer (or even an intern), or maybe the program isn't that important to them. Whatever the reason, though this job is there, and it is a job opening, it's not something they're interested in filling right now.

Then, of course, there are the job openings that just suck, and those are plentiful in this economy; jobs that don't make much more than minimum wage. Those jobs are fine if you've not invested years of your life and a lot of debt in getting an education (that you probably shouldn't have even pursued), but there are plenty of people with college degrees who won't do construction , factory work, CSR style jobs, and the like, for a variety of reasons. A lot of people won't take menial tasks either, because not only are those not very profitable, but because they have the training necessary for something better and realize that working a job like that will make it a lot harder to find time to get a job in keeping with their expectation.

And, of course, then there's all the skilled labor jobs that people just aren't interested in. For some reason, everyone thinks their child, no matter how mediocre when it comes to book learning, should go to a four year program. We look down, as a society, on people who go to technical schools, which is weird, because I know guys who are airplane mechanics, electricians, welders, steel and iron workers, and some of those guys make far more than people I know with law degrees. There are plenty of skilled labor jobs out there that people just aren't qualified for.

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