Will turning down an internship offer from Google affect my chance to apply to Google for a full-time position in the future?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Augustine Jennings



Will turning down an internship offer from Google affect my chance to apply to Google for a full-time position in the future?

Of course not. In fact, the opposite is true.

Companies want to interview people they think will do well in their interviews, right? So which of these people is most likely to get good results?

  • Pat, who was previously interviewed and received an offer.
  • Alex, who was previously interviewed and was rejected.
  • Carey, who has never been interviewed.


Anyone would bet on Pat in this case, obviously. Your recruiter, if he knows you have been interviewed before and received an offer, will probably prioritize you over other candidates.

Make sure to tell your recruiter that you previously received an offer from Google. Help to

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Of course not. In fact, the opposite is true.

Companies want to interview people they think will do well in their interviews, right? So which of these people is most likely to get good results?

  • Pat, who was previously interviewed and received an offer.
  • Alex, who was previously interviewed and was rejected.
  • Carey, who has never been interviewed.


Anyone would bet on Pat in this case, obviously. Your recruiter, if he knows you have been interviewed before and received an offer, will probably prioritize you over other candidates.

Make sure to tell your recruiter that you previously received an offer from Google. It will help you.

In fact, if you can find a way to "casually" mention that you received an offer from Google while applying to other companies (Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, etc.), go for it! A technology company will look at the above cases in exactly the same way and use the fact that it received an offer from a similar company as proof that it could do well in its interviews.

That said, bidding decisions are usually made ultimately based on that round of interviews.

Absolutely not!

A past successful interview almost guarantees you will be considered again and the initial phone review will most likely be eliminated.

Significant effort is needed to filter the large influx of resumes, time and effort in initial screening, coordination, and more effort on site, before finding the candidate who does not meet the requirements. Starting with a candidate who once passed the bar is a bonus and a no-brainer.

The above assumes that one was reasonable in rejecting an offer, one did not act like an idiot!

From personal experience, I decided to give up an internship at Google LA in 2013, because I wanted to work

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Absolutely not!

A past successful interview almost guarantees you will be considered again and the initial phone review will most likely be eliminated.

Significant effort is needed to filter the large influx of resumes, time and effort in initial screening, coordination, and more effort on site, before finding the candidate who does not meet the requirements. Starting with a candidate who once passed the bar is a bonus and a no-brainer.

The above assumes that one was reasonable in rejecting an offer, one did not act like an idiot!

From personal experience, I decided to give up an internship at Google LA in 2013, because I wanted to work on my PhD thesis. Five years later, Google waived the phone review, citing dozens of those interviews.

It surely won't hamper your career. I have an experience in this situation, so I suppose it will be fine if I provide my views.

First of all, I was selected for an internship at Google India in 2013, which I turned down for another research internship at Microsoft. Second, in 2014 I was selected for Google SF, but I preferred to choose Apple.

This does not mean that I have contempt for Google, but I am saving my internship at Google for 2016. A good performance in the internship determines your package. So it seems reasonable enough to decline 2 offers from Google and hope to get the third offer.

If it is m

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It surely won't hamper your career. I have an experience in this situation, so I suppose it will be fine if I provide my views.

First of all, I was selected for an internship at Google India in 2013, which I turned down for another research internship at Microsoft. Second, in 2014 I was selected for Google SF, but I preferred to choose Apple.

This does not mean that I have contempt for Google, but I am saving my internship at Google for 2016. A good performance in the internship determines your package. So it seems reasonable enough to decline 2 offers from Google and hope to get the third offer.

Yes, it may seem that the situation could go wrong and you may not receive an offer in 2016. Still, you must have faith in yourself and your knowledge.

Who knows what an empire could do with a simple idea that will knock out Google?

Be sure to shake up the industry.

I used to recruit for Google and I can tell you with absolute certainty that if you turn down a job offer gracefully, it won't hurt your future chances of being hired at all.

For other companies (not Google)


Post MBA I always wanted to work for a specific telecom / technology company. I applied three times over 4 years and that company accepted me three times. The first two times I turned them down, the salary was too low to justify leaving my current job. The third time they offered me 4 times the package they offered before because I had to be an expatriate to Europe.

In recruitment. It's about the specific job and problems the recruiter needs to solve ... and not really about the candidate's track record.

If you are the best person. You will be hired.

Google recruiters actively pull past rejections to see if people's positions have changed. Sometimes we have even made another offer without needing to interview them again.

No. I don't have direct evidence of this, but in general, when you apply for a large company, they don't necessarily care if you turn them down.

Especially when it comes to an internship. Internships are your chance to test the water and see what it would be like to work somewhere.

A few years ago I found myself completely heartbroken after not getting a job after an interview that I thought went well. The norm in big technology is not to comment on why a candidate is rejected and this is very difficult to handle. It makes you question everything: your skill set, which you spent your entire life honing; your intelligence and your ability to solve problems; your ability to present your best self.

This is how I managed. I went back to my job that I had fallen in love with and did the best I could.

I was working for a small startup at the time and it was exhausting. Commut

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A few years ago I found myself completely heartbroken after not getting a job after an interview that I thought went well. The norm in big technology is not to comment on why a candidate is rejected and this is very difficult to handle. It makes you question everything: your skill set, which you spent your entire life honing; your intelligence and your ability to solve problems; your ability to present your best self.

This is how I managed. I went back to my job that I had fallen in love with and did the best I could.

I was working for a small startup at the time and it was exhausting. The commute was long and I had to take a daily 10pm conference call with our team in Asia, which was the time I got home anyway. But I was working on interesting problems and my team loved and valued me. He was also learning a lot, both technically and as a person. The fact that I had felt so vulnerable helped me absorb and grow. Many of my coworkers were my age or older (thus over 40) and had a wealth of life experience and knowledge on how to handle stress, career + family and all those under appreciated facets of work in technology .

So I really focused on my work and doing my best. I rediscovered the joy of coding, of building things that work and that matter. I was submitting code, creating features that were proven to win over customers. He was happy with the fact that he was going to do this for at least 6 months, before re-evaluating and starting looking again, possibly longer, and he was determined to make the most of it.

Finally, I realized that I was not ready for that interview. I made sure I had enough time in my week to learn, so that I could be better at my job. I took the time to explore concepts that I never felt comfortable using, I read a lot, I also wrote.

Turns out I didn't wait 6 months. A few weeks after this, I had the opportunity to interview with Uber and by then, I was done (and got the job).

Overall, that cycle of crushing despair and then intense learning and growth took about 3 months.


Then. For all those who say that it is not a failure, if they have not been in the situation that the questioner describes, they do not realize how hard it hits them.

So my advice to you is:

  • Whatever your current job, keep doing the best you can. Do something you can be proud of.
  • Set aside some time in your week to learn.
  • Coding interviews are a very small subset of the engineer skill set, which is possible to master (this is assuming you are interviewing for the engineering position as the bulk of my answer, by the way).
  • He doesn't idolize big tech companies. Sure, the perks are great, but to be honest, my time at a small startup was more challenging than my years at Facebook. There are interesting problems everywhere, inspiring people, and opportunities for greatness everywhere.

Good luck!

Emotions:

You have been rejected. Congratulations. Welcome to the club.

I have worked for a good number of "prestigious" places in my life. However, for every job that I have had, there have been at least 5 rejections that I have faced (usually it was more than 10 or more), and I have gone through some of the periods where "everyone" was hired and I still had so many rejections.

I also recommended highly qualified candidates, included them in the interview process, and heard from them that despite my internal recommendation, which supposedly carries "a lot of weight," they have been rejected in the interview.

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Emotions:

You have been rejected. Congratulations. Welcome to the club.

I have worked for a good number of "prestigious" places in my life. However, for every job that I have had, there have been at least 5 rejections that I have faced (usually it was more than 10 or more), and I have gone through some of the periods where "everyone" was hired and I still had so many rejections.

I also recommended highly qualified candidates, included them in the interview process, and heard from them that despite my internal recommendation, which supposedly carries “a lot of weight,” they have been rejected at the interview stage.

I did interviews, I wrote very positive reports on the candidates, only to see that the hiring committee chose to pass them.

I have been the one who decides who has to choose the final person for the position and I had to go to the candidates who were qualified for the job (or the internship, etc.) because there was only 1 position and 3 candidates who were all on top.

And if you want to know something, there is something worse than being rejected outright. Yes, there really is. You are receiving an offer, but it is less than your current salary. They love you, but you are not worth enough to them to pay you what you are already earning. They are telling you that you are being overpaid and that you are not worth what you think you are worth. That hurts even more. I was there, I did that too.

Actually, that's worse than being fired, which has happened to me too.

So yeah, it's hard to be rejected. It's hard to be out of work and worry that there might not be a job prospect for you. Especially if you're one of those "Americanized men" who put a lot of self-employment into their "career."

But dealing with rejection and failure is part of life and how you do it shows your character, as does the way you deal with success. They are the two sides of the coin. If you can keep your spirits in rejection and not gloat over success, realizing that both have a lot to do with factors beyond your control, you will survive.

Negative emotions:

The worst thing you can do is take it personally.

Especially do not resent those who have passed when you did not. You don't know why they happened. If you are lucky, you will know why you did not. We will get to that next.

However, don't complain about your hiring. Don't complain about your lack of skills. They were hired. Someone saw something positive in them. The fact that it does not reflect you more on you than on them.

Don't complain about your coworkers, your former coworkers, your bosses, your previous assignments, your lack of advancement, your lack of opportunities, the work environment. You say it. Do not complain. Not in an interview. Not in the public media. Preferably, not even between close friends, even if they are complaining.

When you do that, word gets out that you are not a team player. That you are toxic. It makes you look petty, jealous, vindictive, petty. You have a chip on your shoulder. The amount of negative descriptions we have for those people should show you that you don't want to be in that crowd.

Learn the maxim: Do not judge, so that you are not judged. Cut it to the key point: don't judge.

Learning:

The important thing to learn from rejections is to learn from them.

If your interviewers have given you feedback, take it seriously. It doesn't matter if you agree with the comments or not. It does not matter if it is a difficult pill to swallow or not. They have given you feedback. They are the judges. Listen to them. By definition they are right. If you don't agree, I'm sorry, but that means you're wrong.

Now more often you will not receive feedback. However, if you are lucky, you will know something that you felt you did wrong. For example, he was too quiet while working on the problem and did not express his thought processes. You forgot to talk about the tests. You were too wacky at some irrelevant point. You had not studied those kinds of algorithms and you got lost. You did not know key terminology.

What. If you notice something in an interview that you weren't satisfied with, turn it into something you work on to improve. You may need to find a friend to do mock interviews with so that you feel more comfortable talking while coding on a whiteboard. Maybe you need to improve some relevant algorithms. You may need to read some literature on the subject area. Maybe you need to make sure you have a cheat sheet with notes on the things you want to make sure to talk about in an interview. Or maybe a cheat sheet of things you don't want to talk about.

The interview is a skill. It can be learned. You just have to push yourself to do it and improve.

Adjust your sights:

If you focus on a few companies, you will surely be more disappointed. I never focused on conducting interviews with a few companies. I interviewed all the relevant places that were open. When I took the job at Google, I had interviewed at Bloomberg, Mathworks, Cavium, EZChip, Boston Scientific, and probably a few others. Most of them were rejections. So yes, I was hired at Google and at the same time I was rejected by "lesser" companies. They reject you a lot.

Do not give up:

Not everything comes to everyone immediately.

My first jobs were not prestigious. When I got out of college, DEC didn't immediately hire me when I was the fashion company. I was rejected by startups I really wanted to work for. Five years later, I received an offer from Microsoft, but it was for less than what I was currently paying. To work for a startup, my ex wife and I had to start our own company. I spent over 15 years hiring to get the freedom I wanted. Sometimes I couldn't even get a contract and had to take some lousy full-time jobs just to keep working. One on my resume was so bad that I left after 3 months.

However, I finally got contracts with DEC and they were a really interesting job. I got to build parts of the optimizer for the Alpha processor. I made a novel use of compression theory to make a previously unsolved problem manageable and reduce compile times that exceeded two days and crashed because paging disks (not just one disk, but an entire cluster) were overflowing to two hours and completed successfully. . I took a research tool and put it into practice. Lots of fun things.

A little later, I got a contract with Intel to create a compiler from scratch. Amazingly successful project. Intel liked me so much that they begged me to come in full time, which made me more profitable than what I made as a contractor. After my first project, they let me design a part of a chip. I was able to turn what I knew into hardware. Then I was able to redo that by working on a software implementation that outperformed hardware. He had teams in Arizona, Ireland and China that were doing whatever he asked of them.

And then I worked at Google. The place that everyone knows.

Sometimes it just takes patience.

First of all, we need to answer the question: How does the host search process work for Google interns during the summer of 2016? In short, you are put in a group of people who want a project with a lot of "notes" on you and your attributes (GPA, interview score, education, preferences, languages). Potential hosts are "fishing" in this group for someone they would like as an intern.

Based on this we can reach the following conclusions:

  1. It is a fairly random process with no guarantees. You can get a deal the same day you were added to the pool, or you can stay there unnoticed for months. I
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First of all, we need to answer the question: How does the host search process work for Google interns during the summer of 2016? In short, you are put in a group of people who want a project with a lot of "notes" on you and your attributes (GPA, interview score, education, preferences, languages). Potential hosts are "fishing" in this group for someone they would like as an intern.

Based on this we can reach the following conclusions:

  1. It is a fairly random process with no guarantees. You can get a deal the same day you were added to the pool, or you can stay there unnoticed for months. I know a guy with an IOI medal who went through interviews without a hitch, didn't get an offer for a few months, and ended up not going to the internship. Based on my personal experience and a very poor data sample, the chance of not getting an offer is about 10%.
  2. If you want to get an offer, it must be made easily reachable in the pool. You need a set of standard ideas that can be interesting to the host. Those thoughts are languages ​​you know and possible past experience. Also, you need to tailor this to a project you would like to work on. If you want to do some tests, write them WHERE you can. If you want to build a pipe, do the same. If you want to do some machine learning, good luck with that (checkpoint 3), everyone wants to do machine learning. However, if you have real experience and you coded something other than linear regression in matlab, you should be better than 95% of the people who took a course on Coursera and think they are insane.
  3. Apparently this is not the process you want to go through. What you can (and should) do is contact a potential host directly. Actually, this is sometimes done by your recruiter, but not necessarily. However, you can Google it and try to find people who work on Google on something that interests you. Then those people will find you in a pool and you will have a chance. If you are a first-time intern, you don't have to worry too much about this.
  4. You want to get to the pool as soon as possible, because the fewer people in the pool, the greater the chance that they will find you.

I interviewed and worked at Google before. of course there is a "BEST TIME", but it is very difficult to predict or know what the best time is.
It depends on your skill set and corresponding openings in the hiring division.
For most candidates who do well in interviews, interview scores are given just above the refusal limit.

Therefore, the hiring committee has to choose from highly qualified candidates. If there is no urgent and pressing need for candidates to fill positions, they will reject all candidates to avoid poor recruitment.

But if there are roles, they are looking

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I interviewed and worked at Google before. of course there is a "BEST TIME", but it is very difficult to predict or know what the best time is.
It depends on your skill set and corresponding openings in the hiring division.
For most candidates who do well in interviews, interview scores are given just above the refusal limit.

Therefore, the hiring committee has to choose from highly qualified candidates. If there is no urgent and pressing need for candidates to fill positions, they will reject all candidates to avoid poor recruitment.

But if there are roles they are looking to fill immediately and if you have the relevant experience and background, even if your interview scores are not stellar, you would be selected (assuming no other candidate is more qualified than you in the interview pool at those 2-3 weeks whose interview scores are close to you too, which I suppose rarely happens).

So ultimately, it's about whether there is a vacancy that some team is trying to fill. Looking at google jobs website, you cannot tell if there is a vacancy or not ... as most of the ads are old and don't often have one-to-one correspondence with vacancies and some job postings only They look for "good to have" candidates rather than "necessary" candidates.

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