Will I need a driver's license for my future autonomous car?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Jerome Willis



Will I need a driver's license for my future autonomous car?

Yes. You don't understand the role of autonomous cars in the future. Self-driving cars are meant to give the driver a break, take him somewhere when he can't or shouldn't drive. Drunk, injured, sleepy, etc. It is to help a driver on a long journey. In the next 30 years, autonomous cars will not be able to cope with all situations. Driving is an incredibly complex activity that requires a lot of anticipation and understanding, which will be very difficult to program in a self-driving car. For example, seeing a moose heading straight down the road. A human driver wil

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Yes. You don't understand the role of autonomous cars in the future. Self-driving cars are meant to give the driver a break, take him somewhere when he can't or shouldn't drive. Drunk, injured, sleepy, etc. It is to help a driver on a long journey. In the next 30 years, autonomous cars will not be able to cope with all situations. Driving is an incredibly complex activity that requires a lot of anticipation and understanding, which will be very difficult to program in a self-driving car. For example, seeing a moose heading straight down the road. A human driver will pick up on the moose and start evasive actions long before an autonomous car does. Autonomous vehicles can only focus on a narrow spectrum of the road. U.S, As human beings, we collect a great deal of information about road conditions and process it with astonishing efficiency. An autonomous car would not have and will not have for many decades the ability to "see" such a moose. You can only know that there is some kind of large object that is moving. You will not be able to determine that there is a fence or other obstacle and therefore the moose is not a concern or you know that the moose is peacefully chewing on some grass and therefore not a concern or detecting a moving pattern and predict that it will work out. on a moose in the middle of the road in 3 minutes. The first thing the car will know about the moose is seconds before it hits the road. You will not know if it is a moose, a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. You can only know that there is some kind of large object that is moving. You will not be able to determine that there is a fence or other obstacle and therefore the moose is not a concern or you know that the moose is peacefully chewing on some grass and therefore not a concern or detecting a moving pattern and predict that it will work out. on a moose in the middle of the road in 3 minutes. The first thing the car will know about the moose is seconds before it hits the road. You won't know if it's a moose, a car, or an alien, just that large object that has unexpectedly hit the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. You can only know that there is some kind of large object that is moving. You will not be able to determine that there is a fence or other obstacle and therefore the moose is not a concern or you know that the moose is peacefully chewing on some grass and therefore not a concern or detecting a moving pattern and predict that it will work out. on a moose in the middle of the road in 3 minutes. The first thing the car will know about the moose is seconds before it hits the road. You won't know if it's a moose, a car, or an alien, just that large object that has unexpectedly hit the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. You will not be able to determine that there is a fence or other obstacle and therefore the elk is not a concern or knows that the elk is peacefully chewing on some grass and therefore not a concern or detects a moving pattern and predicts that it will result. on a moose in the middle of the road in 3 minutes. The first thing the car will know about the moose is seconds before it hits the road. You won't know if it's a moose, a car, or an alien, just that large object that has unexpectedly hit the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. You will not be able to determine that there is a fence or other obstacle and therefore the moose is not a concern or you know that the moose is peacefully chewing on some grass and therefore not a concern or detecting a moving pattern and predict that it will work out. on a moose in the middle of the road in 3 minutes. The first thing the car will know about the moose is seconds before it hits the road. You won't know if it's a moose, a car, or an alien, just that large object that has unexpectedly hit the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that large object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that large object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly. a car or an alien, just that big object that has unexpectedly entered the road. You will not be able to predict the reactions of the other vehicles and act accordingly.

An autonomous car will not be able to notice that a driver is acting erratically. You also won't see a rain storm coming and know that this particular road gets really slippery when wet. The car's first reaction will also be loss of traction and it may be too late. Nor will an autonomous car know that Farmer Joe's dog likes to chase cars and slow down when in that environment around Farmer Joe's house. Self-driving cars will have no idea that a tree is about to be thrown onto the road, although you, as the driver, can see that the tree is starting to fall and will react immediately as well. An autonomous car will not know that it is in danger of being hijacked and will have to exit that intersection immediately.

Driverless cars are designed for urban areas and as a kind of autopilot, like what airplane pilots use, so you can take your hands off the wheel and do something or if you are sleepy or drunk or have a hard time driving to that I can use it. To help you. However, you should always monitor what the car is doing and be ready to jump in the instant a problem begins to arise that the car will not be able to handle.

You also shouldn't have so much reliance on driving the car that your own abilities atrophy, leaving you stranded or possibly in an accident if the autonomous driving functions don't work properly or you choose a dangerous course of action.

Maybe. Certainly, a license will not be needed for those using fully autonomous autonomous vehicles ("faSDV"). Just as we do not need a license to be a passenger in any vehicle. But it may also be the case that people who do not use faSDV (human driving) no longer need licenses. And even with the possession of a driver's license or authorization, your ability to drive could be restricted!

But it may also be the case that people who do not use faSDV (human driving) no longer need licenses.

What happens when the number of drivers as a percentage of the adult population drops to 2%?

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Maybe. Certainly, a license will not be needed for those using fully autonomous autonomous vehicles ("faSDV"). Just as we do not need a license to be a passenger in any vehicle. But it may also be the case that people who do not use faSDV (human driving) no longer need licenses. And even with the possession of a driver's license or authorization, your ability to drive could be restricted!

But it may also be the case that people who do not use faSDV (human driving) no longer need licenses.

What happens when the number of drivers as a percentage of the adult population drops to 2% or less? Today we have a vast driver's license infrastructure that costs many millions a year. What is the probability that we will maintain this infrastructure and try to pay off its costs on a handful of drivers? I would suggest that states are unlikely to retain any driver's license infrastructure. Even a single state office may not be able to cover costs. And certainly, driver's license fees will contribute nothing to overall state revenue.

If human driving becomes an 'edge condition' and no revenue capture for states, I think most or all will simply remove the licenses and look for another method to address the situation.

My best alternative to a state issued license is requiring human drivers to have a very large and comprehensive coverage insurance policy. Think of all the risks and the millions of coverage. In exchange for this insurance policy, the insurance may require some standardized educational / training certification from an approved educational institution or entity.

I would also expect the vehicle to require a 'black box' that can identify the driver (facial scan, fingerprints, biological, etc.) and that a confirmation of insurance coverage is made via a chip or an internet query. Uninsured means no driving and perhaps a notification to the police if there is movement without "approval." But all at no cost to the state.

And even with the possession of a driver's license or authorization, your ability to drive could be restricted!

At some point, the vast majority of conduction (95% +) could be via faSDV. When this happens, even if there is NO license requirement for human driving, human driving may be restricted at certain times and / or places. The freeway and central business district may have access limitations for the driving of people during peak periods to help maximize traffic throughput. Certain high-density areas may have restrictions on the driving of people as a safety measure for pedestrians. Certain weather conditions may have restrictions for driver safety.

Simply put, at some point, traffic operating conditions can be greatly modified to use faSDV capabilities to improve traffic flow (speed and time) through convoys, intersections without traffic lights, traffic directions at the modified streets, etc. It could be dangerous to have a human driven vehicle in these environments and it would certainly be disturbing.

Summary .... there is probably no government license requirement AND limitations on human driving.


This question is similar to another and this answer draws much of my answer to that question: Bob Reisner's answer to Will we need a driver's license in 2040?

Surely remember that an autonomous car will never be allowed to be fully autonomous.

There are always times when autonomous cars cannot judge for themselves, no matter how autonomous they become.

They will always have to have some kind of human interaction there, as the risks are too great for fully autonomous vehicles.

What if a solar flare hits the GPS network and stops it, or the GPS fails in the car or the satellite itself fails?

Nor should you ever allow yourself to get into a situation where you are completely reliant on technology to be there to support you, because or

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Surely remember that an autonomous car will never be allowed to be fully autonomous.

There are always times when autonomous cars cannot judge for themselves, no matter how autonomous they become.

They will always have to have some kind of human interaction there, as the risks are too great for fully autonomous vehicles.

What if a solar flare hits the GPS network and stops it, or the GPS fails in the car or the satellite itself fails?

You also should never allow yourself to get into a situation where you are completely reliant on technology to be there to back you up, because one day it won't.

We go on excursions with the explorers, and sometimes we have been on excursions and asked the explorers where we are. They say it's okay, the leader has Google maps or OS on his phone, so we can directly say that ... we try to teach them that it is a wrong answer. Yes, they are right, we have Google maps on our phone or OS maps activated. our phone and that's fine, we know where they are (most of the time!), but even we as leaders don't fully trust that because we know it could fail at any moment: the battery could run out, the phone could fail, The telephone network could fail or go out of range, even the satellite could fail,

The same is the case with autonomous vehicles: they must always have the ability to refer to human interaction if they are not clear on the decision. As intelligent as they are, in the same way that both ships and airplanes have very advanced guidance systems that are capable of guiding them. However, they both still have a trained captain who can override the computer if they believe the computer has failed. At times this has proven to be detrimental to safety, as for example, the cruise ship that crashed a few years ago off an island in Italy, the ship's computers were telling the captain that he was getting too close to the island, but he wanted to say hello. to his friend and so on until ... bang ... he hit the rocks.

Take this as an example of why a car cannot be fully autonomous and why you would still need a driver's license ...

You drive at night and you come to some roadworks with traffic lights, the traffic lights have a program in them that if they are in unattended mode and something goes wrong, they go into what is known as "All Red" mode. For safety, what happens is that all traffic lights turn red (thus stopping all traffic to avoid a crash), at this stage the technician tries to figure out what went wrong and get the lights working again. Now if these lights are in an unattended area, it could be a few hours before the technician realizes they have failed and gets there to fix them. If you are in a fully autonomous vehicle and you approach these lights, what do you do? Well, the car will stop because it detects a red light. So what….

Today, any autonomous function is simply an aid and you remain responsible for operating your vehicle. Today's technology lacks the ability to handle each and every possible situation. Even the best systems now struggle with construction zones, poorly constructed roads, hidden signage, visibility limitations like rainfall and glare, leaving fuzzy logic firmly in your hands. In the future, systems will improve, but technology is expensive in addition to increasingly expensive crash protection and energy efficiency technology. An unassisted autonomous vehicle is likely to be

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Today, any autonomous function is simply an aid and you remain responsible for operating your vehicle. Today's technology lacks the ability to handle each and every possible situation. Even the best systems now struggle with construction zones, poorly constructed roads, hidden signage, visibility limitations like rainfall and glare, leaving fuzzy logic firmly in your hands. In the future, systems will improve, but technology is expensive in addition to increasingly expensive crash protection and energy efficiency technology. Chances are, a self-driving autonomous vehicle will be out of anyone's price range for many decades. In addition to these systems,

Now let's say you ever want to travel. The world beyond the old America still relies on the manual transmission, so you've likely already disqualified yourself from the freedom that being able to drive any rig brings you. Any place that is not a highly developed nation would not have the budget for readily available premium rentals, nor would it have an infrastructure that these systems could be designed to navigate. Just look at how much expensive equipment all the DARPA challenge vehicles have to run to barely navigate their courses at low speed! And this assuming you are in a place where anything larger than a moped is available and can traverse city streets.

Finally, I guess anyone asking this question has no idea how exhilarating the driving experience can be. Take a three-day course through the week-long AMG Driving Academy at a Bondurant academy, with an open mind and heart, and you will likely never want to sit in the future sensory deprivation chambers where the autonomous vehicles. Plus, you'll learn skills that traditional licensing processes lack, making you a safer, more competent, and confident driver in any condition, car, or country.

The day I can't drift into a chicane on a snowy mountain road in a new car due to technology is the day I leave the car buying market.

Two very different issues, also related!

  1. Humans will continue to need licenses to control cars to the point where vehicles are 100% replacing human drivers. That's a long way to go, but before that happens, vehicles will need to be certified as safe in some way. Let's call that a certification, rather than a license, because the software and all hardware components will need to meet strict security standards. In theory, once that basic standard is reached, over-the-air software updates will allow cars to gradually improve and be truly vulnerable to physical defects.
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Two very different issues, also related!

  1. Humans will continue to need licenses to control cars to the point where vehicles are 100% replacing human drivers. That's a long way to go, but before that happens, vehicles will need to be certified as safe in some way. Let's call that a certification, rather than a license, because the software and all hardware components will need to meet strict security standards. In theory, once that baseline standard is reached, over-the-air software updates will allow cars to gradually improve and be truly vulnerable to physical defects like sensors getting dirty or failing as they age.
  2. I interviewed an insurance developer a couple of weeks ago for the channel and asked him a similar question (the video will be available in the next few weeks), he said: roughly, that insurance is an evolving service and it has to provide coverage for everything whatever is required. In the short term, that's covering humans with different levels of coverage based on vehicle safety and driver experience (plus all the stats related to their environment, style, etc.). The insurance, to be valid, must have a calculable level of risk and, for this, the system or the insured thing must be very measurable. Liability is therefore extremely complex and is no longer just down to humans and the driving style or power of the vehicle, but to a combination of many new factors,

These are good questions that the insurance industry is grappling with in considerable detail and, in the UK at least, many of the ongoing AV trials involve insurance companies (the UK insurance market is one one of the most advanced in the world generally speaking, which is why he is considered an intellectual leader in the industry) to properly understand the ramifications of computers and systems that control a complex machine in a truly dangerous environment.

Originally, this question was: Do passengers in a self-driving car require a driver's license?

Answer: No. That is why they are called passengers. For now, once autonomous vehicles are available, there will have to be a licensed driver responsible for the car, someone directly in charge of the autonomous driving activity of the car.

Eventually this will change, but not at first.

Now this question says: Will I need a driver's license for my future autonomous car?

Smart answer: No, but you will need a driver's license for yourself, if you are the driver "in charge" of the autonomous car. TO

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Originally, this question was: Do passengers in a self-driving car require a driver's license?

Answer: No. That is why they are called passengers. For now, once autonomous vehicles are available, there will have to be a licensed driver responsible for the car, someone directly in charge of the autonomous driving activity of the car.

Eventually this will change, but not at first.

Now this question says: Will I need a driver's license for my future autonomous car?

Smart answer: No, but you will need a driver's license for yourself, if you are the driver "in charge" of the autonomous car. For now.

Although a car may be autonomous, those cars will not be required to have a driver's license.

It is not a "when" question; it's a "yes" question.

The problem with autonomous cars is its premise. Basically you plug in the destination in the car and wait until it is there. The car is not flexible. You cannot take a random detour to an unfamiliar location and drive into the blue. Plus, you're deprived of the thrill of driving itself. Of course, those reasons are not the most efficient or the safest. But those are, among others, what attract people to drive themselves.

To your question. The short answer is no. Do you need a license to travel by bus or taxi? Therefore, there would be no

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It is not a "when" question; it's a "yes" question.

The problem with autonomous cars is its premise. Basically you plug in the destination in the car and wait until it is there. The car is not flexible. You cannot take a random detour to an unfamiliar location and drive into the blue. Plus, you're deprived of the thrill of driving itself. Of course, those reasons are not the most efficient or the safest. But those are, among others, what attract people to drive themselves.

To your question. The short answer is no. Do you need a license to travel by bus or taxi? Therefore, there would be no reason to know if you know how to operate the vehicle. When accidents happen, it is never your fault. Now it is the responsibility of the car and the manufacturer. All people need to know is who owns the autonomous car and what was injured or damaged.

Now, don't think I'm against autonomous cars. I like technology. You can wake up, get ready to travel, and sleep until you get to work. It saves a lot of time by not having to drive and can be used to do whatever you want, whether it's working more, sleeping, or spending time with other people. Many human deficiencies can be eliminated, thus avoiding accidents. Cars follow the law, preventing even more accidents. Cars perform perfectly in stressful scenarios, avoiding accidents.

I conclude that autonomous cars will replace most forms of public transport, such as buses and taxis. Close operation 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, without salary and without poor employees who fight, do not go to work, have no accidents, etc. regular cars (see above). However, there will always be a market for non-self-driving cars and hence the need for driver's licenses.

Not once is it truly completely autonomous. Unlike an airplane, there will eventually be very little reason to have a driver aboard all autonomous cars, because it is relatively easy to stop a car safely if the AI ​​that the driver or the car is doing develops a fault. A driver is unlikely to have the ability to take over the driving of a fully autonomous car in a sudden and rare emergency and bring it to a safe stop better than automated backup systems. It's one thing when a car is only partially driven, but if 99.9999% of the time the AI ​​is flawless and infallible, the driver just won't be ready.

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Not once is it truly completely autonomous. Unlike an airplane, there will eventually be very little reason to have a driver aboard all autonomous cars, because it is relatively easy to stop a car safely if the AI ​​that the driver or the car is doing develops a fault. A driver is unlikely to have the ability to take over the driving of a fully autonomous car in a sudden and rare emergency and bring it to a safe stop better than automated backup systems. It's one thing when a car is only partially driven, but if 99.9999% of the time the AI ​​is flawless and infallible, the driver simply won't be ready to take control. Therefore, it will not be necessary to have a driver on board and therefore a license will not be required. We already have autonomous trains and there is no one on board who has to be a licensed train driver, the same with the elevators, etc.

In fact, I think governments will be happy to encourage as many people as possible not to get licenses. That will reduce the number of human drivers on the road and thus the number of accidents, it can also reduce some people's motivation to own their own car, reducing car ownership in congested cities. Although I think the reduction in car ownership that autonomous vehicles will bring has been vastly overestimated. People who can afford it will always want their own 'carriage' for a multitude of reasons.

First of all, this will ultimately depend on the jurisdiction. Some countries or states may require a license while others do not.

Broadly speaking, there are six levels of autonomous vehicles defined by SAE International, from level 0 (not self-driving) to level 5 (fully automatic driving).

Up to level 4 cars, the driver will need to take control in at least some situations (for example, in bad weather conditions). It is obvious that the driver will need a license to operate such cars.

Only level 5 cars will be able to circulate everywhere without human intervention. However, a Tier 5 car can have as

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First of all, this will ultimately depend on the jurisdiction. Some countries or states may require a license while others do not.

Broadly speaking, there are six levels of autonomous vehicles defined by SAE International, from level 0 (not self-driving) to level 5 (fully automatic driving).

Up to level 4 cars, the driver will need to take control in at least some situations (for example, in bad weather conditions). It is obvious that the driver will need a license to operate such cars.

Only level 5 cars will be able to circulate everywhere without human intervention. However, a level 5 car can still have a steering wheel that allows a human driver to take control. I assume that most laws will require a driver's license for cars where this option exists. Otherwise, it would be almost impossible to catch someone driving such a car without a valid license; they could simply state that the computer was conducting.

For level 5 cars that don't even have a steering wheel (or other human interface to drive), on the other hand, there is no point in requiring a driver's license.

Of course you will! HOW ELSE WILL YOUR MONEY BE TAKEN FROM YOU? ... you fool. : ^}

Why then couldn't I QUOTE you for… uh… .. Driving with an expired license, OH HUMANITY !!!!!

What if the Car's "Windows Operating System" had a Brain Fart from Traffic Light conflicts. ??????? You may have to drive (if Big Brother lets you) to the shoulder for a "Everybody get out of the car, get back in and reset the battery switch" so you can continue your journey.

Then the children, oh, the children. Why should you dress up to take them to school?

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Of course you will! HOW ELSE WILL YOUR MONEY BE TAKEN FROM YOU? ... you fool. : ^}

Why then couldn't I QUOTE you for… uh… .. Driving with an expired license, OH HUMANITY !!!!!

What if the Car's "Windows Operating System" had a Brain Fart from Traffic Light conflicts. ??????? You may have to drive (if Big Brother lets you) to the shoulder for a "Everybody get out of the car, get back in and reset the battery switch" so you can continue your journey.

Then the children, oh, the children. Why should you have to dress to take them to school or any activity? Send them to the car, it will take them away. They will not have the enhanced Mark of the Beast intracranial data chip to allow them to drive or even get out of the car until their scheduled arrival at their destination.

A BRAVE NEW WORLD AWAITS! Although… SOME will be GOOD! No more drivers or drivers to take out or pizza! Self-driving cars can deliver, but “Drone Delivery” can be at your front door, patio, poolside, or campsite.

Will you need a license? Honestly, I am afraid to live long enough where such a license is not required as you will NOT be allowed to operate such a fallible human machine.

Oh mankind

It depends. If the car is 100% autonomous and there is no manual override to handle emergency situations, then no, you won't need a license, you will just be a passenger. You may need to show that you have the "right" to ask him to take you somewhere, that is, to make sure you are not stealing it, but you would not need a driver's license because you would not be driving.

However, if the car returns to "manual control" during emergencies, it is very likely that you will need more than a driver's license; You may need a special license to show that you have received training on how to react appropriately in various emergencies.

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It depends. If the car is 100% autonomous and there is no manual override to handle emergency situations, then no, you won't need a license, you will just be a passenger. You may need to show that you have the "right" to ask him to take you somewhere, that is, to make sure you are not stealing it, but you would not need a driver's license because you would not be driving.

However, if the car returns to "manual control" during emergencies, it is very likely that you will need more than a driver's license; You may need a special license to show that you have received training on how to react correctly in various emergency situations. where the car gives up and makes you take command.

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