Will automation create jobs?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Frankie Matthews



Will automation create jobs?

Artificial intelligence (AI) and related technologies will create as many jobs in the UK as they will displace over the next 20 years, according to an analysis published by PwC.

The research claims that while AI could displace roughly 7 million jobs in the country, it could also create 7.2 million jobs, resulting in a modest net increase of around 200,000 jobs.

However, the impact of AI on individual sectors will vary. In the health and social work sector, PwC said the number of people employed could increase by nearly 1 million, while manufacturing industry jobs could fall by roughly 25 percent, a net figure.

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Artificial intelligence (AI) and related technologies will create as many jobs in the UK as they will displace over the next 20 years, according to an analysis published by PwC.

The research claims that while AI could displace roughly 7 million jobs in the country, it could also create 7.2 million jobs, resulting in a modest net increase of around 200,000 jobs.

However, the impact of AI on individual sectors will vary. In the health and social work sector, PwC said the number of people employed could rise by nearly 1 million, while jobs in manufacturing could fall by roughly 25 percent, a net loss of nearly 700,000 roles.

As for other sectors, PwC said professional, scientific and technical services would see a net increase of 16 percent, while education would see a 6 percent increase. On the contrary, it is estimated that the transport and storage and public administration sectors will experience decreases of 22 and 18 percent, respectively.

Automation will require more technology skills. In the future, more jobs will be created using these skills.

The McKinsey Global Institute report, Skill Shift: Automation and The future of the workforce, predicts which jobs would be automated most and least likely:

  1. Higher Cognitive - These skills include advanced literacy and writing, quantitative and statistical skills, critical thinking, and complex information processing. Doctors, accountants, research analysts, writers, and editors often use them.
  2. Social and emotional, or so-called "soft skills": include advanced communication and negotiation, empathy, the ability to learn continuously, to manage others, and to be adaptable. Business development, programming, emergency response, and counseling require these skills.
  3. Tech - Covers everything from basic to advanced IT skills, data analytics, engineering, and research. These are the skills that are likely to be the most rewarded as companies seek more software developers, engineers, robotics experts, and scientists.

The report also says that workers with the following two skill sets are likely to suffer the most, though not in all professions.

  1. Physical and manual skills comprise tasks that could be performed by relatively unskilled labor, such as drivers and assembly line workers, as well as skilled workers, including nurses, electricians, and craftsmen.
  2. Workers such as tellers, customer service personnel, and those involved in low-level data entry and processing, such as typists and clerks, need cognitive skills such as basic literacy and numeracy.
  • Development and adaptation: the machine will not develop and program itself for quite some time.
  • Crypto - Automation will involve a lot of crypto and security. This will make systems complex, also to maintain (bugs in SmartContracts will be a real challenge). Works.
  • Energy: energy is the only thing we can cultivate on this planet and we will need a lot to automate and maintain information. Growth means jobs, not in large corporations but in general.
  • Materials: the machine, automation needs raw materials, and these cannot be cultivated on this planet (there may be space mining). Recovering materials will be a
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  • Development and adaptation: the machine will not develop and program itself for quite some time.
  • Crypto - Automation will involve a lot of crypto and security. This will make systems complex, also to maintain (bugs in SmartContracts will be a real challenge). Works.
  • Energy: energy is the only thing we can cultivate on this planet and we will need a lot to automate and maintain information. Growth means jobs, not in large corporations but in general.
  • Materials: the machine, automation needs raw materials, and these cannot be cultivated on this planet (there may be space mining). Recovering materials will be a work engine
  • Maintenance, repair and repair: automation generally does not include self-maintenance of the machine, many jobs
  • Add the human factor: means how emotional value can be added to the automation result. The machine looks and feels like a machine.
  • Protect reality: road signs, signage, notifications, procedures, add-ons, infotainment should be moved to accessible virtual worlds based on individual needs and requirements. The world doesn't have to look like TimesSquare. Lighting is also a threat.
  • Rescue the diversity of information: information technology and, specifically, automation reduce diversity. Divers are complex, they are an exception, they are expensive, which will result in a reduction in diversity. The rainforest increases diversity, the machine will always try to reduce it. The works will come to rescue diversity.
  • Human again: as the machine takes over the jobs, humans can stop behaving, being disciplined like a machine. Support will be essential to empower them to live their own life, to develop value for themselves apart from work. Automation can create freedom for man to enjoy a different life, it is not always measured by job performance. Also jobs.

Automation is about standardization, concatenating processes so that one feeds on the next to minimize waste. Therefore, we will need teams to build new and more effective user interfaces, the so-called UX engineers. A new set of equipment will be needed to bundle and organize manufacturing operations into shared pools, where waste from fish farming can feed hydroponics used to grow fruits and vegetables, as is done in the Netherlands.

This little country feeds the world

Many large-scale institutions, such as power production and distribution, need a complete redesign, all linked by an advanced smart grid.

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Automation is about standardization, concatenating processes so that one feeds on the next to minimize waste. Therefore, we will need teams to build new and more effective user interfaces, the so-called UX engineers. A new set of equipment will be needed to bundle and organize manufacturing operations into shared pools, where waste from fish farming can feed hydroponics used to grow fruits and vegetables, as is done in the Netherlands.

This little country feeds the world

Many large-scale institutions, such as energy production and distribution, need a complete redesign, all linked by advanced smart grids. So urban planners meet engineering technology. And they have to do things in real time since we have about 20 years to transform, or the next 20 years will become a very difficult environmental challenge for our progeny. Instead of being placed on Easy Street, everyone will become a Survivor contestant. It just won't be an 8 week program, it will be the new normal.

The emergence of Brain Machine Interface is going to create a new industry and could affect the law, change notions of privacy and create new jobs for people to develop a new generation of Synthesesia content.

Waiting for the new world with bated breath and unease on the edge of my seat.

The effect of automation is easy to understand. When Henry Ford introduced mass production to the automobile, not only did his factories provide thousands of jobs in and of themselves, but increased production created a great demand for all the materials needed to produce his product. And while this may vary from product to product, look at the entire industry that was created to support the product. One important thing to note here is that Rockefeller's Standard Oil was always looking for new purposes for waste products from refining petroleum into kerosene. Henry Ford's automobile became the main co

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The effect of automation is easy to understand. When Henry Ford introduced mass production to the automobile, not only did his factories provide thousands of jobs in and of themselves, but increased production created a great demand for all the materials needed to produce his product. And while this may vary from product to product, look at the entire industry that was created to support the product. One important thing to note here is that Rockefeller's Standard Oil was always looking for new purposes for waste products from refining petroleum into kerosene. Henry Ford's car became the main consumer of gasoline, a former waste by-product that burned down.

There has not been any amount of automation that has permanently created unemployment. Jobs have been displaced, but many more have been created.

Just one more late addition. If you enjoy summer barbecues and cookouts, have you ever wondered where the charcoal bouquet came from? Scrap material, Henry Ford's Model T had a wooden frame and wooden wheels. Making them generated mountains of hardwood scrap. Henry, not wanting to waste anything, commissioned his cousin's husband to find a use for the wood. His name was Edward Kingsford.

Our algae production systems are HUGE in volume and surface area, and have hundreds of automation parts (sensors, controllers, and actuators, etc.) in each unit that need to be inspected, repaired, and calibrated or replaced at least once per year to operate one of our Scalable Biomass Engines 24/7 for 6 months in a row. That's a lot of ongoing automation work and it's all as necessary as technicians operating, monitoring, cleaning, and resetting a system that essentially accelerates an algae bloom and smashes the gear pedal to the ground. Without applying the principles of automation and

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Our algae production systems are HUGE in volume and surface area, and have hundreds of automation parts (sensors, controllers, and actuators, etc.) in each unit that need to be inspected, repaired, and calibrated or replaced at least once per year to operate one of our Scalable Biomass Engines 24/7 for 6 months in a row. That's a lot of ongoing automation work and it's all as necessary as technicians operating, monitoring, cleaning, and resetting a system that essentially accelerates an algae bloom and smashes the gear pedal to the ground. Without the principles of automation that are applied and kept within strict parameters, it is simply not possible to produce between 2 and 4 tons of algae every 24 hours.

New technologies like ours are automation intensive, that's no lie. But if I can spend triple the cost of a pipeline pond on automation knowing that I will get 6 to 9 times the output from the same pond, why wouldn't you?

An example is agricultural automation. 250 years ago 90% of the population worked in the fields. Automation made farms more productive and freed up labor for more productive work. The economy grew and now we are rich enough to pay for more goods and services than we could afford in the old days.

This process has been going on since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. When shirts were made by hand, with hand-woven cotton fabric that was picked by hand and spun by hand, most people could afford to have only one or two shirts because each shirt represented weeks of work. but now we can afford dozens

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An example is agricultural automation. 250 years ago 90% of the population worked in the fields. Automation made farms more productive and freed up labor for more productive work. The economy grew and now we are rich enough to pay for more goods and services than we could afford in the old days.

This process has been going on since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. When shirts were made by hand, with hand-woven cotton fabric that was picked by hand and spun by hand, most people could afford to have only one or two shirts because each shirt represented weeks of work. but now we can afford dozens of them because automation is used at every stage and now it takes a lot of 10-15 minutes of labor to make the raw cotton shirt.

Yes!

The downside is that the idea of ​​automation is to replace more jobs than it creates or, less likely, to increase production through automation so much that the same number of human employees is required. One way to pay for the negative impact of job replacement by robots is for workers to own the business / machines.

To take the other meaning, also "Yes!" There will be new types of jobs that will become commonplace, such as the field of Mechatronics: Mechatronics

When the machinery reached the textile industry in Britain, the weavers were furious. There were protests. There was violence.

When the dust settled, not only was production per person significantly improved, but the industry was employing more people.

This was because higher levels of efficiency meant lower costs per unit, which resulted in more people buying textiles.

Therefore, the net effect on employment was positive. It was just that people couldn't keep doing what they had always done.

There is no progress without job destruction.

You mean the jobs that will be created in the future? The answer is yes. For a more detailed explanation, I recommend reading the statements of a futurist who lives in Colorado. Here is the link.

162 Future jobs: the video

No and yes. :)

Let me start with the "yes" part:

100 years ago, a designer needed to physically create designs that could be made with ink and a printing press. And the hand-drawn illustrations might have been the only graphics you could get.

75 years ago there were no personal computers, and designers needed to physically create designs using film and giant creations in a studio, using rulers, knives, and drawing tables.

50 years ago, the time between taking a (professional) photo and seeing that photo was measured in days. The video was something you created on a sound stage with gigantic professionals

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No and yes. :)

Let me start with the "yes" part:

100 years ago, a designer needed to physically create designs that could be made with ink and a printing press. And the hand-drawn illustrations might have been the only graphics you could get.

75 years ago there were no personal computers, and designers needed to physically create designs using film and giant creations in a studio, using rulers, knives, and drawing tables.

50 years ago, the time between taking a (professional) photo and seeing that photo was measured in days. The video was something he created on a soundstage with a gigantic professional crew.

Now we do those things in minutes, for free, and millions of people have access to it. That's layout automation, and it's great!

Many design tasks will continue to be automated, so in that sense, fewer designers will be needed overall to do the same amount of work. And some of those "tasks" may be things that you currently consider "creative" steps in the process, like choosing a layout, making a layout system, or making your typeface perfect for a given device.

Automation, especially through AI, is highly likely when it comes to things that are predictable, repetitive, or common to most projects. And sometimes automation doesn't come in the form of choosing a layout automatically ... when I envision an AI-enabled designer, I envision a tool that is aggregating data from thousands or millions of websites and sort of A / B testing of each combination. possible of items and settings. You could make a full prototype in a few minutes and iterate 100 times in an afternoon.

Controversial Statement: I think many designers who currently have a job are simply doing common, repetitive, and predictable tasks all day long, because they are too lazy to do better. Those people are very expensive compared to the improvements they can offer. But I digress ...

In that sense, design automation is inevitable. And it will be amazing to be a designer when you get here. The layout (any kind of layout) will be more like Tony Stark's tools ... you won't code the UI or think about the tool itself, you'll just ask for things and manipulate the result in real time. Creativity will not be replaced, it will accelerate. Engineering will be faster and more experimental than ever. Why choose a design when you can explore thousands of them in one afternoon?

That's the "yes" part of this answer: design jobs will be automated. And some of that will happen soon.

But there is no such thing as "absent" design automation.

Part no:

Some parts of the design are not easily automated, no matter how good your AI is, because they are unique, contextual, and irrational. As we saw earlier, the process has been automated, but that allows us to have a new process, which is faster, better and more powerful.

As designers gain more experience, "design" is less and less about creating visuals and features, and much more about solving business, human, data, and uncertainty problems. Or just subjective preferences, like the material your coffee mug is made of. Those things are not predictable, repetitive, or common to all projects. Each one is special and / or stupid in their own way. Sometimes extremely valuable problems only exist because of how a company operated 30 years ago ... and people need to change.

Much of the business logic and user needs for a specific situation are invisible, confusing, and difficult to define even when you are the one investigating them. Sometimes a problem is actually best solved with "if then" rules, or simply by changing the way you communicate it to people.

Those are the kinds of problems that AI isn't even close to solving. Although on a long enough timescale ...;)

As automation increases, the design will also become much more personal. When you can design one thing and make a million variations available to customers, the design options become more interesting and more complex. Automation will allow designers to tackle more ambitious problems and ideas.

In the distant future, as automation becomes more common, I believe creative / design thinking will be more valuable, not less. And more people (maybe all) will be able to do what we currently consider "design." Maybe we can describe a design and the computer will show it to us. Maybe we can run an entire company on our own, because AI can generate the digital products and services we envision. Maybe design something like a Star Trek Holodeck experience, like a service. Perhaps neural interfaces allow people to communicate through brain-to-brain connections, and we will need designers to create the "space" where those brains interact. Or maybe the designers create the "minds" of the robots instead!

It is exciting. Maybe a little intimidating. But change always is. But when you think about it, that's what designers are: changing tables.

How is "change" automated?

Just be sure to focus on the skills that don't automate easily, and it will be valuable for years to come. Also, learn how automation works ... you might end up designing that instead!

Job automation is inevitable. It is a real threat to our jobs and income if we do nothing about its potential impact and influence on our future. It is not a question of if, but of when. While automation depends on a number of factors, there are a number of things we could do to prepare for the future of the negative impacts of job automation.

First, factors that affect the level of job automation include:

  1. The country you live in, for example, technologically advanced countries like Japan, Germany, Korea, etc., versus developing countries.
  2. The industry you work in, for example the transportation industry
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Job automation is inevitable. It is a real threat to our jobs and income if we do nothing about its potential impact and influence on our future. It is not a question of if, but of when. While automation depends on a number of factors, there are a number of things we could do to prepare for the future of the negative impacts of job automation.

First, factors that affect the level of job automation include:

  1. The country you live in, for example, technologically advanced countries like Japan, Germany, Korea, etc., versus developing countries.
  2. The industry you work in, for example, the transportation industry has a lot of innovation, like driverless vehicles versus fine art.
  3. The job or occupation you currently have; For example, if you take care of the elderly, then there is not much automation, compared to a truck driver.
  4. The skills and experience you currently have, for example if you are a truck driver, then your job could change significantly by 2035, compared to a personal trainer.
  5. The level of education you currently have, for example if you have a college degree, then you are better prepared for the future of work and to acquire high-level skills that will be in demand.
  6. The company you work for, for example the company you work for, must have the ability, capacity and resources to automate your work, compared to a small family or a business with cash.

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Not all things are the same.

Therefore, the impact of work automation will be significantly different for each individual.

The reality is that I will not have job security if I do not anticipate, plan, and mitigate potential negative impacts on my current and future job, income, and income streams.

I am well aware that people do not plan to fail, they simply fail to plan ahead and protect themselves.

We have to proactively plan to create positive conditions for ourselves instead of passively waiting for things to happen to us. This is to allow us to confidently secure our future jobs and income rather than leave it to chance.

Just hoping for the best is not a strategy.

The method of hope and prayer will not work!

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Your willingness, ability and personality to constantly improve and upgrade will be crucial in the age of increasing automation. The choice is yours.

To prepare for the era of increasing automation, there are three phases to this:

  1. Anticipate future skill and knowledge requirements within the context in which you are operating.
  2. Acquire the right skills and knowledge to bridge any gap between the present state and the future.
  3. Act now (is to act now instead of procrastinating). 'Just do it' will be your motto.

The choice is yours. Be adversely affected by job automation or take action now to prepare for the future and protect your income and job security.

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