Why was Steve Jobs expelled from Apple? Who was John Scully?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Theodore Rosales



Why was Steve Jobs expelled from Apple? Who was John Scully?

John Sculley was the president of Pepsi. In the late 1970s, Apple's board of directors was concerned that Jobs and Wozniak would make major business mistakes (as they had no business experience to speak of) and were looking for a new CEO who could rule things. Jobs nominated Sculley, who initially refused but ultimately agreed.

Now, Jobs wasn't much more technically inclined than Sculley - they were both marketing-oriented people. This is important to note, because the story is not one in which a genius was toppled by an old stick in the mud, but the story of a businessman who was upset.

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John Sculley was the president of Pepsi. In the late 1970s, Apple's board of directors was concerned that Jobs and Wozniak would make major business mistakes (as they had no business experience to speak of) and were looking for a new CEO who could rule things. Jobs nominated Sculley, who initially refused but ultimately agreed.

Now, Jobs wasn't much more technically inclined than Sculley - they were both marketing-oriented people. This is important to note, because the story is not a story in which a genius was overthrown by an old stick in the mud, but the story of a businessman who was hired to prevent a couple of children from taking a major computer company bankrupt due to incompetence.

See, in the early 1980s, Jobs spearheaded the LISA project, an attempt to clone some Xerox ALTO items using ex-PARC personnel. (Apple was full of ex-PARC staff). The LISA was technically interesting in some respects, but it was a big risk: the company's money maker was Apple relatively inexpensive line of home computers, and LISA was a hugely expensive GUI machine with no existing software and no compatibility with other Apple computers. Despite being very expensive, the LISA was also very slow. Another former PARC member at Apple at the time, Jef Raskin, spearheaded his "Macintosh" project and wrote memos criticizing the design and marketing decisions behind LISA. After its release, it became clear that Raskin was 100% correct about the project's flaws.

(Raskin continued development on HIS Macintosh, initially under the name Swyft. Canon bought Swyft, and eventually, years later, released his design as the Canon Cat. The cat was enormously high priced and hardly commercialized, as It was a result of Canon's internal politics. But it was a substantially more interesting and innovative machine than Jobs's LISA or Macintosh. But that's a completely different story.)

Jobs continued to act erratic during the birth of his Macintosh. He spent company money to put a luxury car and a Harley Davidson motorcycle on a pedestal in the middle of the Macintosh group office to "inspire" them. He stopped bathing. He regularly picked employees at random and yelled at them until they cried, sometimes in the Macintosh group and sometimes just arbitrary Apple employees. He caught top technicians from Apple's flagship product lines and put them on the Macintosh team without notifying management. He hired someone to follow him with a boom box playing Michael Jackson's "Billy Jean" on repeat for weeks. He demanded that everyone on the software end write everything to a hand-made assembly and demanded that the hardware folks avoid extension ports. He demanded that his graphics routine boy, who was already late, come up with a new technique for quickly drawing rounded bezels on boxes because he had seen rounded bezels on a restaurant table that day. He hired Ridley Scott to direct the Macintosh commercials and then aired them during the Superbowl.

It was all extremely expensive, damaged the product lines that were making reliable money for Apple, and was clearly, at least partially, the result of the whims of an egotistical and mentally ill boy-boy. And it didn't work: the Macintosh had a disappointing launch, it was cheaper than the LISA but two to four times the price of the more capable machines that came out around the same time, and what's worse, due to the marketing blitz and the restructuring of existing lines had occurred, Apple got stuck being the "Macintosh company" in a way it had never been with LISA. LISA was a single failed and risky project, but now the entire company was linked to the Macintosh brand permanently, and the Macintosh brand was born dead.

After this disappointment, Jobs did not reduce his spending of company money or his employee abuse. So Sculley began to control the damage. Telling Jobs to fix himself didn't work, so they moved him to the new office building that was under construction so he would have to cross town to harass other employees. Jobs responded to that by finding a random Apple employee, firing him, and taking over his office. Eventually, the board of directors began to debate the firing of Jobs, who was the face of the company, but it had become a huge responsibility, and Sculley reluctantly agreed. However, Jobs found out about this discussion through other channels. He responded by taking most of his Macintosh team and a few other people from across the company, sending a “they can't fire me; I resign ”letter to Sculley,

Sculley handled this as well as she could, under the circumstances. The only thing anyone can criticize him for is not firing Jobs sooner. He went on, tried to save the Macintosh brand, and succeeded (basically by continuing and extending the marketing efforts started by Jobs that worked, such as offering volume discounts to schools and adopting the "rogue genius" aesthetic pose adopted for some of the early Macintosh marketing materials - and cutting out the ones that didn't). He also spread myths, promoting the influential design-fiction "Knowledge Navigator" and innovative internal projects like Hypercard.

First, John Scully was the president of Pepsi-Cola until he became the CEO of Apple Inc. in 1983. He was known as the Pepsi Challenge guy for the Pepsi Challenge, an ad campaign started by Pepsi.

When the board members thought Steve Jobs was too young and didn't have much experience to run the company, they decided to hire someone to run Apple Inc. And John Scully was chosen by Steve Jobs. John Scully was a great marketer, but he doesn't know anything about computers.

But still, John Scully ran the company well until the Macintosh computing project was launched. Macinto

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First, John Scully was the president of Pepsi-Cola until he became the CEO of Apple Inc. in 1983. He was known as the Pepsi Challenge guy for the Pepsi Challenge, an ad campaign started by Pepsi.

When the board members thought Steve Jobs was too young and didn't have much experience to run the company, they decided to hire someone to run Apple Inc. And John Scully was chosen by Steve Jobs. John Scully was a great marketer, but he doesn't know anything about computers.

But still, John Scully ran the company well until the Macintosh computing project was launched. Macintosh was the project led by Steve Jobs himself. It was said that it would be the computer of the future for the next 10 years. But it was a failure. Steve Jobs wanted to lower its cost, but John Scully wanted to increase it because he thought it would help Apple Inc. generate more cash. But due to their high cost, Macintosh computer sales are down. On the other hand, the LISA computer was also a failure for Apple Inc. So, Apple II was the only computer responsible for 70% of Apple Inc.'s revenue.

Steve Jobs was very fascinated by computer technology, but John Scully was a marketer. They both had a different style of running Apple Inc., so they both had different visions for Apple's future. That is where they are differently.

At that stage, Steve Jobs wanted to develop a more advanced and better product than the Macintosh, but John Scully wanted to increase the sales of Apple Computers to generate more cash.

This led to discussions, disputes, riots between them and when the Board members found out about this. They thought John Scully's vision for Apple was correct and they supported him. That leads to the departure of Steve Jobs.

Steve Jobs resigns from Apple Inc. with their stakes and many team members also left Apple Inc. with him.

Thanks!

John Sculley had previously worked for PepsiCo before Steve Jobs brought him to Apple, driven by his marketing skills.
According to the Steve Jobs biography written by Walter Isaacson, John Sculley knew how to play, while Steve Jobs did not.
He joined IBM and entered into secret negotiations with the board of directors and convinced them to prefer himself over Steve Jobs.
Then Steve Jobs was fired from the company he founded, fired by the person he hired.
Anyway, Steve Jobs was restored.


And the legend lives on ...

Technically, he was one of the 3 founders of Apple. Therefore, he was eligible to be the CEO. Now why only he became the CEO and not the other 2 co-founders?

The third co-founder left the company shortly after. Initially, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak ran the company as a kind of partnership, with Jobs in charge of marketing and Wozniak in charge of engineering. He hired a seasoned corporate executive, John Sculley, to be Apple's CEO.

Then Sculley himself played a role in Jobs' firing. About 12 years later, Jobs' company, NeXT Computers, was hired by Apple, and he soon became CEO.

Then in 1997 it became

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Technically, he was one of the 3 founders of Apple. Therefore, he was eligible to be the CEO. Now why only he became the CEO and not the other 2 co-founders?

The third co-founder left the company shortly after. Initially, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak ran the company as a kind of partnership, with Jobs in charge of marketing and Wozniak in charge of engineering. He hired a seasoned corporate executive, John Sculley, to be Apple's CEO.

Then Sculley himself played a role in Jobs' firing. About 12 years later, Jobs' company, NeXT Computers, was hired by Apple, and he soon became CEO.

So in 1997 he became the CEO of Apple simply by virtue of his huge stake and the fact that he had enormous (and admired) experience in selling computers.


As an afterthought, Steve Jobs was a charmer of people. On the other hand, engineers and programmers are a commodity; They come by the thousands. But a cult leader like Jobs? That's really one in a million. That's why Apple's board named him CEO in 1997.

Their products like the iPhone and iPad were NOT new or innovative at all. There were numerous prototypes of all-touchscreen phones from Microsoft, Nokia, Motorola, etc. dating back to 1997. There were also tablet-like devices with a stylus introduced by some other companies. However, none of them were successful because customers preferred a physical keyboard.

But in 2007, when Steve Jobs made fun of the keyboard at his now famous event when he introduced the iPhone, people took advantage of it. I think this was simply because Jobs was almost a cult leader. Logically speaking, his arguments against the keyboard were frivolous; Nokia had already solved the shrunken screen issue with the sliding keyboard AND clam-shaped phones (which, frankly, I find a lot sleeker than touchscreen phones).

But just because the great leader of the cult, His Highness Mr. Jobs, had spoken, it was the truth of the gospel: keyboards are poorly designed and the iPhone touchpad is the way to Nirvana.

So people don't buy Apple products because they are good. They buy them out of reverence for their blind faith in their demigod, Mr. Steve Jobs.

Steve Jobs was the face of Apple, he was a peddler, the best carnie. He was a controlling son of a bitch who had some great ideas. People always talk about him always winning, but in reality, he had a success rate of around 50%. But when he hit, he homered. At Apple, he came up with many world-changing ideas and an equal number of failures, but who remembers failures, right? Apple wasn't his only success: he supported Pixar for years out of pocket until it was successful, then negotiated its sale to Disney, and also negotiated the promotion of Pixar's top staff.

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Steve Jobs was the face of Apple, he was a peddler, the best carnie. He was a controlling son of a bitch who had some great ideas. People always talk about him always winning, but in reality, he had a success rate of around 50%. But when he hit, he homered. At Apple, he came up with many world-changing ideas and an equal number of failures, but who remembers failures, right? Apple was not his only success: he supported Pixar for years out of pocket until it was successful, then negotiated its sale to Disney, and also negotiated the promotion of Pixar's top staff to run Disney, specifically John Lasseter, who is currently the boss. Creative Officer for Pixar Animation Studios, Walt Disney Animation Studios, and DisneyToon Studios.

Jobs' biggest failures were Apple itself (the board kicked him out because they felt he couldn't run a mature company) and NeXT, before he was asked to return to Apple.

Because of his larger-than-life personality and his creative ability to bring inventions to market that changed the way people live their lives, Jobs will always stand out.

But don't let that overshadow Wozniak. It has a cult status around the world, something that Jobs will never have. Steve Wozniak is a brilliant man, I always say that he is the last human to have all the computers in his head, both the hardware and the software, which is an amazing feat. Today, people specialize in particular areas, but in the past, when computers were a little simpler, you could be a generalist and Steve Wozniak was way above the rest.

Wozniak was never a front man, preferring to be a "simple engineer" than anything else. It's this trait that has kept you out of the limelight, but don't be fooled, there are cult followers of The Woz who know who you are and what your accomplishments are and they stand up and listen when you have something to say.

I was Apple Employee # 667 and was associated with the company from the early 1980s to the mid-1992. Even during his "first act," Jobs practically accepted and followed through on the hype that the media and the public gave him as the "main man" in the "company that invented the personal computer." He was an excellent spokesperson for the company; His hippie background, along with his demanding, uncompromising and confrontational management style, was irresistible to the media, making Jobs the public face of the company. During the years when the Apple II was the flagship (and during the inception of the Mac

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I was Apple Employee # 667 and was associated with the company from the early 1980s to the mid-1992. Even during his "first act," Jobs practically accepted and followed through on the hype that the media and the public gave him as the "main man" in the "company that invented the personal computer." He was an excellent spokesperson for the company; His hippie background, along with his demanding, uncompromising and confrontational management style, was irresistible to the media, making Jobs the public face of the company. During the years when the Apple II was the flagship (and during the early years of the Mac, when the Apple II paid the bills), those in the know were quick to acknowledge that Steve Wozniak actually invented the company. s founding product and several of the key technologies that Apple used in all of its product lines for many years. Woz was quite simply a technical genius, not to mention a good technical teacher. That and his experience as a rogue phone phreaker made him a hero to the technical team. He was a "guru" to a large following, but he lacked Jobs's charisma and affinity for public speaking and promoting himself. So it tended to take a back seat. It wasn't a huge contributor to the Macintosh, so as that product line eclipsed the Apple II line, it faded further and further into the background, a process that continued once the iPod, iPhone, and iPad came to dominate. the Apple catalog. . not to mention a good technical teacher. That and his experience as a rogue phone phreaker made him a hero to the technical team. He was a "guru" to a large following, but he lacked Jobs's charisma and affinity for public speaking and promoting himself. So it tended to take a back seat. It wasn't a huge contributor to the Macintosh, so as that product line eclipsed the Apple II line, it faded further and further into the background, a process that continued once the iPod, iPhone, and iPad came to dominate. the Apple catalog. . not to mention a good technical teacher. That and his experience as a rogue phone phreaker made him a hero to the technical team. He was a "guru" to a large number of followers, But he didn't have Jobs's charisma and affinity for public speaking and promoting himself. So it tended to take a back seat. It wasn't a huge contributor to the Macintosh, so as that product line eclipsed the Apple II line, it faded further and further into the background, a process that continued once the iPod, iPhone, and iPad came to dominate. the Apple catalog. .

Jobs was good at marketing. He was very successful in motivating people, but he used a management style that many found caustic. He was, in many ways, a talented and skilled "jockey" of Apple's workforce. He knew what he wanted and developed a vision of the future, which he pursued and promoted with great power and focus. He could have done similar things with a different partner than Wozniak in the beginning. Wozniak's minimalist, software-intensive engineering was brilliant, but a lot of brilliant engineering products crashed and burned back then. Woz certainly benefited from Jobs' early efforts to promote the Apple II to various constituencies.

I would like to point out that the development of the iPod, iPhone and iPad was well under way when Steve Jobs returned to Apple. The company was already selling its first PDA ("Personal Digital Assistant"), the Newton, to individuals and schools, and I attended very confidential meetings, in which future products, quite similar to the iPod, as well as other more important ones were discussed. . , cross-functional and cross-division meetings, where the topic was figuring out the logistics of leveraging the inevitable global wireless phone service. Serious proposals for "ultralight" computers and tablet-sized PDAs have been on the table for several years. Of course, Jobs put his personal stamp on all these developments and steered them in directions that the creators of the project and Apple's top executives at the time (for example, Gil Amelio) might not have chosen. But there was already a roadmap to follow (or reject, or redraw), as well as many basic ingredients ready for Jobs to use when he returned: He didn't make all of these things from the entire fabric, and versions of them would probably have They hit the market without it, in roughly the same time frame that we found them during Jobs' "Second Act." That is, of course, assuming that the company, which was failing before Jobs returned, could have survived long enough in his absence to send those products out the door. Apple's bad experience with the Newton PDA, which Jobs killed upon his return, suggests that the company would not have survived without it. Personally, I think the story of Jobs' journey in exile, his redemption, and his triumphant return had a lot to do with Apple's return to glory. Jobs could always tell a good story, and Apple's customers and press always ate it up. Jobs caught people's attention and made them support Apple like an underdog. In consumer technology, this was a considerable, perhaps global, contribution to today's Apple. Jobs could always tell a good story, and Apple's customers and press always ate it up. Jobs caught people's attention and made them support Apple like an underdog. In consumer technology, this was a considerable, perhaps global, contribution to today's Apple. Jobs could always tell a good story, and Apple's customers and press always ate it up. Jobs caught people's attention and made them support Apple like an underdog. In consumer technology, this was a considerable, perhaps global, contribution to today's Apple.

Most of Steve's wealth was earned when Pixar went public and sold to Disney (see below).

  • His initial wealth was earned when Apple went public in the late 1980s, earning him $ 200 million. A pittance to what came next.
  • When he resigned from Apple in late 1985, he sold almost all of his shares - he kept one share so he could receive annual reports.
  • When Apple bought NeXT for $ 400 million, Steve earned a sizable chunk of Apple stock, which he subsequently sold. Forbes said it would have been worth $ 31.6 billion (in 79 million shares) if it had owned all of its original shares. This was before the 7-to-1 st
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Most of Steve's wealth was earned when Pixar went public and sold to Disney (see below).

  • His initial wealth was earned when Apple went public in the late 1980s, earning him $ 200 million. A pittance to what came next.
  • When he resigned from Apple in late 1985, he sold almost all of his shares - he kept one share so he could receive annual reports.
  • When Apple bought NeXT for $ 400 million, Steve earned a sizable chunk of Apple stock, which he subsequently sold. Forbes said it would have been worth $ 31.6 billion (in 79 million shares) if it had owned all of its original shares. This was before the 7-to-1 stock split! So it would be worth around $ 59 billion today with Apple alone.
  • When Pixar went public, it raised about $ 1.5 billion, making Jobs worth about $ 1.2 billion on paper. Now he was a billionaire.
  • Pixar was sold to Disney in 2006, for about $ 7.4 billion in Disney stock. This made Steve the largest individual shareholder in Disney.

In the end, Steve was worth around $ 11 billion and the Trust that has all of his assets is worth even more now, with Forbes estimating his value at $ 18.3 billion as of this month.

Steve didn't really care about making money. Money was never a big deal for him after launching Apple and receiving the initial investment from Mike Markkula. I think he only cared about doing great things and thought that wealth would come along with that belief.

As for Woz, he was happy with his starting share of the ~ $ 190 million he received in Apple's IPO. He ended up giving a large amount of his stock to other early Apple employees, which Jobs felt were not worthy of a stock grant. He made various investments over the years, but he wasn't interested in being a billionaire either. That being said, he did not sell all of his Apple shares and today he is worth around $ 100 million.

Steve Jobs was fired from Apple because he too believed that Macintosh 1984 would be a success. Jobs blamed his friend and company manager John Sculley (now CEO of OBI smartphones) for having the product overrated.

Here are some of the top reasons Apple got robbed of your jobs and then returned to you:

  1. Steve Jobs built Macintosh with a team of GR8 engineers and when it became a reality he expected 1,000 Macintoshs to be sold every day, but only 10 Macintoshs were sold in a week.
  2. The main reason for the Macintosh failure was the use of a poor performance chip.
  3. Jobs had already warned sculley fo
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Steve Jobs was fired from Apple because he too believed that Macintosh 1984 would be a success. Jobs blamed his friend and company manager John Sculley (now CEO of OBI smartphones) for having the product overrated.

Here are some of the top reasons Apple got robbed of your jobs and then returned to you:

  1. Steve Jobs built Macintosh with a team of GR8 engineers and when it became a reality he expected 1,000 Macintoshs to be sold every day, but only 10 Macintoshs were sold in a week.
  2. The main reason for the Macintosh failure was the use of a poor performance chip.
  3. Jobs had already warned Sculley not to use the cheaper version of the microcomputer chip. but in the end he agreed.
  4. After the Macintosh crash, all of Apple's investors opposed the jobs and called him a maniac, like a kid in a candy store who has the keys.
  5. so he was kicked out, after which he founded NeXT, where he was independent and could use his imagination and creativity to create one of the best GUIs that will eventually be followed by other rival companies (like Microsoft).

  1. then when Apple started to lose its grip on the computer industry, they thought about buying NeXT
  2. so Steve finally returned to Apple. his first business partners made him Apple's iCEO and he soon became the CEO

U might think that getting kicked out of Apple was the worst thing that happened to JOBS.

Well <it was for the best. He said in his Stanford commencement speech that being kicked out of Apple gave him the opportunity to start his own company and use his own intuition to make products.

THAT WAS THE PLACE WHERE HE BECAME THE REAL STEVE JOBS

IN HIS OWN WORDS "I GUESS THE MEDICINE WAS TROPICAL BUT THE PATIEBT NEEDED IT"

Sources put Woz's net worth today at about $ 100 million.

To think that Job's estate is now worth more than $ 19 billion and even Tim Cook himself has a net worth of $ 785 million. I'd really love to know that Woz has 1 million original shares of Apple stock certificates in a box somewhere and that they would now be worth more than $ 1B.

I think the Jobs / Woz relationship will go down in history as one of the greatest tragedies of all time. I'll start by saying that I admire, respect and sympathize with Woz. Woz was the mastermind behind making Jobs' dreams come true. If it weren't for people like Woz, Apple would never have

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Sources put Woz's net worth today at about $ 100 million.

To think that Job's estate is now worth more than $ 19 billion and even Tim Cook himself has a net worth of $ 785 million. I'd really love to know that Woz has 1 million original shares of Apple stock certificates in a box somewhere and that they would now be worth more than $ 1B.

I think the Jobs / Woz relationship will go down in history as one of the greatest tragedies of all time. I'll start by saying that I admire, respect and sympathize with Woz. Woz was the mastermind behind making Jobs' dreams come true. If it weren't for people like Woz, Apple would never have made it through in the early years. Jobs was always the sales master and much later the visionary designer of key products that would make Apple what it is today, but if it weren't for Woz, none of that would have been possible.

I had an "encounter" with Steve Jobs in 1997 and he was certainly an epic figure. I was lucky enough to speak with Woz in 2004, I think. He had his Acura NSX (Silverstone with black interior) for sale and called to ask about it. I bought another car and only spoke to Woz for less than 5 minutes, but he was a very nice guy and genuinely as nice as he looks publicly. He's always been grateful for his role at Apple and has at least said publicly that he doesn't hold a grudge against Steve Jobs. That's surprising, but after briefly chatting with him, I think he means it. Woz has the right attitude about life. He's "grateful" and that makes Woz one of the richest people on the planet. I love you Woz!

Woz is a really nice guy, always cheerful and never grumpy. He is extremely funny, humble, and easygoing.

Woz came to our school to give a talk last semester. The talk was really interesting, where he talked about the early days of Apple, Steve Jobs, what he was currently doing, his vision of current innovations, etc. There was a book signing scheduled after the talk. His autobiography, iWoz, was sold by the firm. You could also bring your own book.

Within minutes, all copies of the book were sold. There was a huge queue of people for the signature, as the event was open to the public.

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Woz is a really nice guy, always cheerful and never grumpy. He is extremely funny, humble, and easygoing.

Woz came to our school to give a talk last semester. The talk was really interesting, where he talked about the early days of Apple, Steve Jobs, what he was currently doing, his vision of current innovations, etc. There was a book signing scheduled after the talk. His autobiography, iWoz, was sold by the firm. You could also bring your own book.

Within minutes, all copies of the book were sold. There was a large queue of people for the signing, as the event was also open to the public. It was around 9:30 p.m. when Woz began signing copies of his book, and continued for more than an hour, signing books, iPhones, and posing for photographs. He spoke happily to each person.

However, he got a bit tired due to the huge line, and since it was late, he had to leave. I was one of the last lucky people to get Woz to sign the book. When I asked him to write a message in the book and sign it, he said that since there were so many people waiting, he could not write the message, but he was very kind and said that he was going to give me the message I asked for. him from his heart :)

When he was about to leave, some people walked behind him and complained to him that the books were out of stock and that they were disappointed that they couldn't get the books signed by him. To which he agreed that it was unfair that they couldn't get books, and suggested that they could take selfies with him instead. What a wonderful guy! Lots of people were able to take selfies with WOZ! (I was also among these lucky few !;))



Easily one of the best days of my life!

On February 21, I had the opportunity to spend time with John Sculley.

He spoke to a small group of us and then spent some time one on one. The question arose about the movie and Jobs' firing. It was very clear. "Steve was not fired." While that quote was clear, it sounded like it had been demoted, and Steve was not so kind to that decision.

John made it clear that while Steve could be tough, "people really liked working for Steve."

John also pointed out that the recent Jobs movie was generally correct, yet the movie put people in the same room to chat.

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On February 21, I had the opportunity to spend time with John Sculley.

He spoke to a small group of us and then spent some time one on one. The question arose about the movie and Jobs' firing. It was very clear. "Steve was not fired." While that quote was clear, it sounded like it had been demoted, and Steve was not so kind to that decision.

John made it clear that while Steve could be tough, "people really liked working for Steve."

John also pointed out that the recent Jobs movie was generally correct, yet the movie put people in the same room for conversations that didn't actually happen in person, or all at once.

If you ask about the emotional reaction at the time he found out about the change, or how he interacted with his coworkers that day, don't ask. Maybe others have an idea on that side. Personally, he was more interested in the decision making that led to the role change.

Steve Jobs left Apple in 1985. At the time he had a dispute with then-John Sculley CEO Arthur Rock, a member of Apple's board of directors. Technically, if you say, Steve Jobs didn't leave Apple. He was fired from Apple after having some business problems related to the Macintosh price and many problems.

At that time, he sold his 6.5 million shares of the company for 70 million.

Job then acquired Pixar for 5 million (10.8 in current terms). He then founded NEXT, which later became the backbone of the Mac. He returned to Apple in 1997. Before the apple entered a series of CEO's Sculley, Spindler,

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Steve Jobs left Apple in 1985. At the time he had a dispute with then-John Sculley CEO Arthur Rock, a member of Apple's board of directors. Technically, if you say, Steve Jobs didn't leave Apple. He was fired from Apple after having some business problems related to the Macintosh price and many problems.

At that time, he sold his 6.5 million shares of the company for 70 million.

Job then acquired Pixar for 5 million (10.8 in current terms). He then founded NEXT, which later became the backbone of the Mac. He returned to Apple in 1997. Before that apple he entered a series of CEO's Sculley, Spindler, Amelio. And then Steve Jobs came in as an interim CEO and then as a full-time CEO.

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