Why was Job's wife (from the Bible) saved?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Mason Hansen



Why was Job's wife (from the Bible) saved?

She must have been completely devastated.

Job says to him: You speak like one of the foolish women. It does not say that you are foolish. He is kind. He understands her bitter soul.

We don't know if after this loss - Job seems to have lost his wife also because she wants him to denounce God - if they can be reunited. The absence of her in the entire remaining Book of Job is perhaps revealing. Although I don't know what.

You do? Can we find out somehow?

It is amazing how this life story is told.

I see the critics (Goethe, Jung,…) as perhaps more stupid than her in her criticism.

It is deep and s

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She must have been completely devastated.

Job says to him: You speak like one of the foolish women. It does not say that you are foolish. He is kind. He understands her bitter soul.

We don't know if after this loss - Job seems to have lost his wife also because she wants him to denounce God - if they can be reunited. The absence of her in the entire remaining Book of Job is perhaps revealing. Although I don't know what.

You do? Can we find out somehow?

It is amazing how this life story is told.

I see the critics (Goethe, Jung,…) as perhaps more stupid than her in her criticism.

It is deep and devastating.

Understanding the book, I think: whoever loses Job, loses God. With an eagle's eye on the matter, everything becomes prey and the viewer a predator. But it is left empty.

Only this:

Capture the smart in their own reasoning.

Said by the wrong man, it is still quoted, scriptural and true (Paul).

And all the beginning and the catastrophes and Job's reaction. I feel like it's not even said in a way that we feel we should sympathize with or even be compassionate towards him. His loyalty seems almost stereotypical and robotic. Until, I'm sorry, he responds to his wife in her bitter remark. Or was it a scream? I don't even know.

And then all this with the permission of the enemies, only in this case of Job not killing. (The children he completely killed).

If I think I can understand by staying outside, I am completely wrong and if I am not moved, I am being moved towards the enemy of God and the enemy of men. (And I have the feeling that all the critics are. And they are very stupid. Jung's Response to Job disqualifies him (as a psychologist and as an intelligent man). And Goethe's parody: framing Faust with Job, disqualifies him. the foolish, the foolish, the stupid.

Of course, the text gives no reason for Job's wife to be saved; it simply never indicates that she dies. In a thoroughly romantic theological slant, I like to think of this as a confirmation of the "sanctity of marriage" and its sacramental nature. Mind you, this is purely my own notion that it has no academic or scholastic merit; it's just a nice thought to me. Genesis 2:24 says: "... a man leaves his father and mother and joins himself to his wife, and they are one flesh." (emphasis mine). It is as if they become an integral part of each other, inseparable, by

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Of course, the text gives no reason for Job's wife to be saved; it simply never indicates that she dies. In a thoroughly romantic theological slant, I like to think of this as a confirmation of the "sanctity of marriage" and its sacramental nature. Mind you, this is purely my own notion that it has no academic or scholastic merit; it's just a nice thought to me. Genesis 2:24 says: "... a man leaves his father and mother and joins himself to his wife, and they are one flesh." (emphasis mine). It is as if they become an integral part of each other, inseparable, almost magically (sacramentally?) Unified. In my theologically romantic notion,

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