Why should we learn HTML in 2020?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Trystan Zamora



Why should we learn HTML in 2020?

Not by itself. But DHTML (html / css / js) absolutely. The reality is that the Internet is fundamentally based on HTML and if you want to participate in making things for the modern world, learn the tools. Knowledge of HTML is essential to creating web pages, regardless of the technology stack you use.

For more information, check out my book: Learn Human-Computer Interaction: Solve Human Problems and focus on rapid prototyping and validation of solutions through user testing. proof

Keep reading

Not by itself. But DHTML (html / css / js) absolutely. The reality is that the Internet is fundamentally based on HTML and if you want to participate in making things for the modern world, learn the tools. Knowledge of HTML is essential to creating web pages, regardless of the technology stack you use.

For more information, check out my book: Learn Human-Computer Interaction: Solve Human Problems and focus on rapid prototyping and validation of solutions through user testing. testing: Becker, Christopher Reid: Books in Foreign Languages.

First of all, you need to learn CSS and javascript with HTML

because if you learn only HTML it is not enough to get a good job

The tech industry is growing fast and many companies are looking for front-end developer so that you can get a job either full or part time also remotely from home with a good salary, you can also work with many projects and link it with your git hub account, which will help you improve your skills and get help from many developers around the world

Also, you can start with this website that I recommend:

1- udacity

2- udamia

3- coursera

4-w3schoole

5- codecademy.

s

Keep reading

First of all, you need to learn CSS and javascript with HTML

because if you learn only HTML it is not enough to get a good job

The tech industry is growing fast and many companies are looking for front-end developer so that you can get a job either full or part time also remotely from home with a good salary, you can also work with many projects and link it with your git hub account, which will help you improve your skills and get help from many developers around the world

Also, you can start with this website that I recommend:

1- udacity

2- udamia

3- coursera

4-w3schoole

5- codecademy.

some of them are free, and the other with fess

I recommend that you start the course with free websites after that, when you are advanced, you can move on to the course with fees.

  1. HTML is the only language that provides structure / markup to our web pages and we will use the web pages whenever we use the internet.
  2. It is used to give the user interface to all web pages. Essential for web design. If you want to be a web designer you must be very good at HTML. Good web designers get very good salaries.

Yes, even if you don't use code tools, it's nice to know how it all works. HTML (along with CSS) is also a solid foundation for further learning and improving your web development skills.

Why should we learn HTML?

1. You can create your exclusive website

Learning HTML would ensure that you can design your unique website without any help. Sure, you can create one from a website that provides you inexpensive or free templates, but that would not only mean that you can't create a creative website of your own, it would also make your website look like everyone else's. So if you want your website to be unique, you should definitely learn HTML.


2. Modify your company's WordPress site

A surprisingly high percentage of corporate websites are based on WordPress. And th

Keep reading

Why should we learn HTML?

1. You can create your exclusive website

Learning HTML would ensure that you can design your unique website without any help. Sure, you can create one from a website that provides you inexpensive or free templates, but that would not only mean that you can't create a creative website of your own, it would also make your website look like everyone else's. So if you want your website to be unique, you should definitely learn HTML.


2. Modify your company's WordPress site

A surprisingly high percentage of corporate websites are based on WordPress. And this is good news for you when you know something about HTML, because you can use it to add content and make changes to your company site.


3. Learn effortlessly

Unlike other programming languages, HTML is much easier to understand and learn. A computer science degree is not required to understand it. Basic knowledge of the web will suffice. Although you can't learn it in a day, even if you spend a few days learning the basics of HTML, you will be able to create your unique web page.


4. Acquire the ability to analyze the presentation and operation of other websites

Even after spending just an hour or two understanding the basics of HTML, you will be able to find some sense in the 'View Source' tab when you right-click on a page. By doing it over and over again, you will become an expert at analyzing websites and checking their source code for the what, why, and how of them.

You will be able to get answers to questions like: What is this item used for here? How was the design created? The answers to these questions may vary from source to source.


5. Almost all browsers support HTML

Almost every browser in the world, from Mozilla to Internet Explorer to Safari, supports HTML. So if your website is written in HTML, you don't need to worry because it will surely appear in all browsers regardless of where it is accessed. If the program takes it into account to optimize the website for different browsers, it will be displayed quickly in any browser.


6. Show off your skills with a perfectly tuned Tumblr blog

It's pretty easy to set up a Tumblr blog to show off that side hustle you've been working on. If you want to submit a stunning display of your freelance photography or graphic design work to the agency you are hiring, you can! Just a little HTML (and CSS) can take a Tumblr template from regular to awesome.


7. Create easy-to-navigate content

Not only should your content, especially long-term content, be easy to read, it should also be easy to navigate. So that people can easily find what they are looking for. An easy way to do this is to create internal links in your content with the help of HTML. If you know HTML, you can easily create these internal links and make your content more professional.


8. Design an amazing email for your clients

Email is fast becoming one of the best online marketing tools out there. And you can create an email that your customers will really expect to receive by organizing and styling it with the HTML and CSS editors available with most email marketing services.


9. Earn more money without worrying about your current job.

If you're in a field where you don't need these skills, you can still learn HTML and do some freelance work for people who are willing to pay for your services. Although these jobs can be time consuming, you will be able to set your deadlines and work at your own pace.


10. Build your online business from scratch

If you are an entrepreneur with some fresh business ideas, with the help of HTML, you can create the custom website you need without anyone's help. Not only will it help you build your own business, it will also save you money. On the other hand, if one of your associates is the one with an entrepreneurial mind, you can help him build your custom website with his coding knowledge and earn some money. Either way, it is a win-win situation.


11. HTML is absolutely free

One of the most notable and significant advantages of HTML is that it is completely free. You don't need to deal with different plugins to work with any software because HTML does not require any plugins.

One does not even have to buy any specific software for it. Therefore, it acts as a profitable method. If we look at it from a business point of view, it is very profitable and profitable to say the least.


12. make your content easily understandable

If you are a content creator or writer, one of the main concerns you will have is the readability of your content with the help of formats such as bold, italics, headings, and colors. With a little help from HTML tags, you can design your content without relying on anyone or anything.


13. More information - Earn more!

If you learn HTML, you won't be able to stop there. You'll start to want to get better at CSS, and gradually mastering the fundamentals will make learning another programming language (such as JavaScript, Ruby, or PHP) much easier. And the more you know, the more job opportunities will open up for you.


Vote if it is useful to you.

Happy learning!

There are a few reasons why people believe this:

The simplicity of languages

HTML and CSS are not that difficult to learn. They simply are not. The declarative nature of HTML and CSS means that "learning" languages ​​is more about building a basic vocabulary of terms than developing an understanding of syntax, logical flow, or organization.

When individual themes are simple, people assume that their application as a whole is also simple.

The availability of resources

Until the advent of the Internet, no one would have assumed that programming was easy. Because to learn to write

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There are a few reasons why people believe this:

The simplicity of languages

HTML and CSS are not that difficult to learn. They simply are not. The declarative nature of HTML and CSS means that "learning" languages ​​is more about building a basic vocabulary of terms than developing an understanding of syntax, logical flow, or organization.

When individual themes are simple, people assume that their application as a whole is also simple.

The availability of resources

Until the advent of the Internet, no one would have assumed that programming was easy. Because in order to learn to write a program, you had to find books and people who could explain the language, syntax, and procedures.

With Google and Stack Overflow, it's hard not to know how to do something in HTML and CSS. There are many sites documenting these languages ​​in excruciating detail and countless blogs for additional information.

The U.S. education system

I blame the American educational system for this. He drives standardized tests throughout his 12 years of experience in public education. What it means is that teachers spend much less time teaching critical thinking and practical application, and much more time teaching students to memorize facts.

So if a language is simple and you have a lot of resources to read about that language, you tend to think that all you have to do is memorize some CSS property and element names.

Online education

I haven't been through Code Academy and it's a lot, but from what I've seen, they teach small components of the process. They seem to teach some application, but most of it seems to be focused on “here's one thing. Here's how to do it, ”with little emphasis on why or what could go wrong.

These resources are very focused on the development of the “Happy Way”, where the student learns a way to do something and that way it always works exactly as expected.

Unfortunately, an online tutorial can't really show you the 5 things that could go wrong if you don't do it the way they are presented, nor does it explain how to diagnose and debug the problem. They also don't focus on browser differences, nor do they teach the value of writing scalable code.

The "neighbor's son" problem

Most developers have had the experience of "yes, my neighbor's son created a web page." It's hard to really see how easy technologies make it possible to use other technologies.

This is the Dunning-Kruger effect in full force; the incompetent are so incompetent that they can't even see how incompetent they are. So they present themselves as experts and others, who do not know more, assume that this is true.

So yeah, the neighbor's son made a web page. He opened notepad, wrote some html, did "save as .html", and the neighbor thinks I can get him a job.

This problem is compounded because people think that because they completed a CodeAcademy course, they are developers. They are not. You are not a developer until you have developed a website. But Code Academy isn't going to put that on its home page, is it?

As a person who learned HTML and CSS alone, I can say that there is no "best way" to learn anything in general.

The way I did it was to spend 4-6 hours every day after school, writing everything from W3Schools in a notebook, to better understand how to write code in HTML and then build websites on my own.

For me that worked, but for others it can be horrible. Don't waste time thinking about how you should write code, or what programming languages ​​you should learn and why.

Think of a purpose. Why do you want to learn JavaScript after HTML and CSS? Why do you want to learn HTML and CSS? Do me

Keep reading

As a person who learned HTML and CSS alone, I can say that there is no "best way" to learn anything in general.

The way I did it was to spend 4-6 hours every day after school, writing everything from W3Schools in a notebook, to better understand how to write code in HTML and then build websites on my own.

For me that worked, but for others it can be horrible. Don't waste time thinking about how you should write code, or what programming languages ​​you should learn and why.

Think of a purpose. Why do you want to learn JavaScript after HTML and CSS? Why do you want to learn HTML and CSS? Do you want to become a web developer? Do you want to spend time creating the look of websites, or do you want to spend time working on the back end, what makes a website really work?

If you still don't know what to learn and how, W3Schools and Codecademy can be a good start to learning to code, but before you start, set a challenge for yourself.

Let's say you search for a nice website on the Internet and find a nice design. As you learn HTML and CSS, try to replicate that layout out of nowhere, using what you learn. See if you like working with HTML and CSS.

Maybe you want to design websites, just using Photoshop and you don't know it yet, so start designing that website using Photoshop even before you start with HTML and CSS.

If you still don't know what you want to learn and how to do it, the best way to start is by working on a project while you learn. Take some photos of the website you want to build or download the design and start building it in parts.

When you get to the basic HTML page restriction in W3School or Codecademy, write that code for your website, start with <html> tag, then <head> tag, then <title>, with <body>, etc.

Build some websites while you learn and you will learn to build anything really fast. The same applies to JavaScript. Don't just learn JavaScript, it can be awful if you are inexperienced with coding.

In the beginning, it will be easy. Simple, variable functions, if and else statements, etc., but then you'll get to more difficult things, and if you don't have a purpose, you might be disappointed and give up pretty quickly.

Once you're good enough with HTML and CSS, think of an app you want to build and start learning JavaScript while building it slowly.

Good luck!

First, I'll assume your goal is gainful employment in the software world.

JavaScript frameworks

Pages are no longer developed in plain JavaScript. Almost all business development uses a JavaScript framework. There are 5 big ones:

  • React
  • Vue
  • Angular
  • Ember
  • Backbone.js

Vue 1 is the most popular framework in terms of GitHub rating:

according to 2019 statistics on the best JS frameworks: React, Angular and Vue | KEY

But React 2 is the leader in terms of mass use.

according to 2019 statistics on the best JS frameworks: React, Angular and Vue | KEY

React is also a leader in terms of jobs, but only by a little:

by Stack Overflow Developer Surv

Keep reading

Footnotes

1 Vue.js 2 React: a JavaScript library for creating user interfaces

First, I'll assume your goal is gainful employment in the software world.

JavaScript frameworks

Pages are no longer developed in plain JavaScript. Almost all business development uses a JavaScript framework. There are 5 big ones:

  • React
  • Vue
  • Angular
  • Ember
  • Backbone.js

Vue 1 is the most popular framework in terms of GitHub rating:

according to 2019 statistics on the best JS frameworks: React, Angular and Vue | KEY

But React 2 is the leader in terms of mass use.

according to 2019 statistics on the best JS frameworks: React, Angular and Vue | KEY

React is also a leader in terms of jobs, but only by a little:

according to Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019

Angular used to be the leader, but he's really been losing steam.

It wouldn't be a bad idea to look at the jobs in your area and see which one is most in demand ...

Most importantly, though, you should look at the top frameworks and decide which one you like best. At the end of the day, they are all quite similar and you mY be able to get a job in framework A even if you only know framework B.

NPM

NPM stands for Node Package Manager. It is the system that is used to build most JavaScript framework based applications. There are a few others out there but you should learn NPM as it is the standard.

Typescript

Typescript is an extension of JavaScript. It gives you some amount of type safety. This can make it easier to catch mistakes earlier (for instance accidentally assigning a string to a number).

It also allows your code to better integrate with modern development tools. On the downside, browsers don't run typing directly, so you'll have to convert to JavaScript before your browser can run your web application. Don't worry, NPM will do it for you.

Good luck!!!

Footnotes

1 Vue.js 2 React: a JavaScript library for creating user interfaces

Yes absolutely,

Because imagine that you don't know anything about coding and you just want to start and that is the year 2021 ... what are you going to do? Will you start directly with React? React native? Or something else ? Alright I guess you started with mobile app development with React Native and set up your environment etc. and launched the template in AVD provided by RN Team, now you want to modify the code.

  1. <View style = {{... styles.container, marginTop: 30, paddingLeft: "2%",}}> 
  2. <Text style = {{fontWeight: "600", textAlign: "center", overflow: "hidden"}}> 
  3. Some text here 
  4. </Text> 
  5. <Button style = 
Keep reading

Yes absolutely,

Because imagine that you don't know anything about coding and you just want to start and that is the year 2021 ... what are you going to do? Will you start directly with React? React native? Or something else ? Alright I guess you started with mobile app development with React Native and set up your environment etc. and launched the template in AVD provided by RN Team, now you want to modify the code.

  1. <View style = {{... styles.container, marginTop: 30, paddingLeft: "2%",}}> 
  2. <Text style = {{fontWeight: "600", textAlign: "center", overflow: "hidden"}}> 
  3. Some text here 
  4. </Text> 
  5. <Button style = {{padding: 10, backgroundColor: "# A4A5", borderRadius: 25}}> 
  6. <Text style = {{... styles.buttonText}}> Click here </Text> 
  7. </ Button> 
  8. </View> 

looking at the above code as absolute beginner, I know that it will seem a bit confusing to absolute newbie who knows nothing about HTML / CSS but imaging you're a person who knows only HTML and CSS, you can easily tell what's happening here… what color codes are used, what styling you use etc etc

so the point is HTML and CSS are really important if you want to go to Front End / Full Stack Development

Javascript is quite an advanced and powerful language on par with java and c ++. There is a lot of demand for js programmers. The first step is to accept the fact that conventional languages ​​like java, c ++, and javascript are not easy to learn. Usually it takes years to master any of them, so choose carefully. You most likely won't master all three because unlike 15 years ago, there is simply so much to learn today and things are developing faster.

Javascript is primarily used for front and back-end web and mobile development (PWA). You can also do some light games, you can make machines

Keep reading

Javascript is quite an advanced and powerful language on par with java and c ++. There is a lot of demand for js programmers. The first step is to accept the fact that conventional languages ​​like java, c ++, and javascript are not easy to learn. Usually it takes years to master any of them, so choose carefully. You most likely won't master all three because unlike 15 years ago, there is simply so much to learn today and things are developing faster.

Javascript is mostly used for front and back end web and mobile (PWA) development. You can do some light games too, you can do machine learning & NLP too because language is very broad and powerful. Yet important thing is that every mainstream language has its own main field of use, like c++ is for games and desktop apps.

Trend of the future is that desktop apps will migrate to the cloud and be used from the mobile/desktop browser like ordinary web pages (PWA). Something similar to the feel and look of MS Visual Studio Code app. For that purpose js is positioned as the important language of the future.

To me js was more difficult to lean than java because it has more different interdependent concepts to grasp, while java is mostly based on OOP, once you master that you are ok. After all, once you connect ropes all languages are similar in concept. Like Bill Gates said programming is mostly based on conditional if ..then..else decisions, same concepts that have different syntax in every programming language but do same things.

Yes !

They are the fundamentals like ‘ABC’ of the Front end development. So irrespective of which framework or library you want to work with, always begin with HTML and CSS.

If you are going to be a back-end developer, learn fundamentals like how HTML tags works and to write CSS codes. It will work when you want to debug an error or something.

If you want to boost your career in Front End Development or Full Stack Development then you need to learn in detail. The universal form for this is always the same. PRACTICE ! CODE! Work on your own personal projects, then continue creating your

Keep reading

Yes !

They are the fundamentals as 'ABC' of Front-end development. So whatever framework or library you want to work with, always start with HTML and CSS.

If you are going to be a backend developer, learn the basics like how HTML tags work and how to write CSS codes. It will work when you want to debug a bug or something.

Whereas you want to drive your career in the Front end development or Full Stack development, then you have to learn in detail. The universal way for this is always the same. PRACTICE ! CODE ! Work on your own personal projects, then go on to creating your own portfolio.

Sounds new? Check this out.

Davide Perozzi | Creative developer

When HTML, CSS is coupled with Javascript, the recipe becomes a simple ‘Wow’ .

Thanks for reading. Happy Coding :)

Since there is no shortage of places or want so learn HTML, I would suggest thinking about why you want to learn it, how fast you need to learn it and how you learn best to help you sort through all of the options.

Some excellent online resources are Treehouse and Codecademy. If you normally like to learn independently, are motivated, and are on a tight budget, this might be a good option for you ... especially if you are learning as a hobby.

If you want to learn fast, you really can't get past a face-to-face course, preferably one that is hands-on so you can learn by doing and get right away

Keep reading

Since there is no shortage of places or no need to learn HTML, I suggest that you think about why you want to learn it, how fast you need to learn it, and how you learn best to help you sort through all the options.

Some excellent online resources are Treehouse and Codecademy. If you normally like to learn independently, are motivated, and are on a tight budget, this might be a good option for you ... especially if you are learning as a hobby.

If you want to learn fast, you really can't go past an in-person course, preferably one that is practical so that you can learn from doing and get immediate feedback when you make mistakes. These can range from a few hours to really teach you the basics, to 10 day intensives like The Institute of Code offers, to full computer science degrees.

Which brings me back to why you want to learn? If you aim is just to build a really basic website for yourself, that's different to equipping yourself with the skills to build more advanced projects or eventually land a job as a front-end developer. Do you want to just 'get the job done' or do you want to follow best practice and ensure the sites you build are cross-browser compatible and built to last?

If you need any more advice, feel free to hit me up on twitter and tell me a little more about yourself and I'll see what I can do to help!

Tina

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