Why should I become a project manager?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Karson Ratliff



Why should I become a project manager?

If there is a career that is ready for the future, then it is project management. As the name suggests, you are managing projects, but this can be misleading. The most important factor in a successful project are the people involved in it. The development team, the customer, and everyone else. Until now, only people can read the subtle nuances of human communication. Only humans can understand complex software systems and how they are best applied to a project. Only humans are capable of identifying wrong assumptions that would otherwise lead to high risks and project failures.

Why Project Manage

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If there is a career that is ready for the future, then it is project management. As the name suggests, you are managing projects, but this can be misleading. The most important factor in a successful project are the people involved in it. The development team, the customer, and everyone else. Until now, only people can read the subtle nuances of human communication. Only humans can understand complex software systems and how they are best applied to a project. Only humans are capable of identifying wrong assumptions that would otherwise lead to high risks and project failures.

Why project management appeals to me so much:

  • Constant change
    • If you don't like constant change, project management is probably not for you. You keep getting new projects continuously forcing yourself to adapt to new requirements, new types of personalities and new areas.
  • Human factor
    • When leading a team, you have a lot of responsibility. At the same time, dealing with different personalities can be challenging. But if you have the right skills and tools, dealing with people is like being a detective solving a mystery. You try to understand why someone behaves as if they are behaving, trying to understand their motivations. The next step then is to find a way to guide and lead each person in the same direction. Since everyone is different, everyone needs to be managed differently.
  • You have a lot of control over how you do your job.
    • You decide how to manage your team, your client and your projects. If you like to decide on your own, project management offers you many degrees of freedom. There is no right or wrong, there is only "Does it work or not?"

People management is an important aspect of a PM job. Because Project Managers deal with a lot of people. ... Control of cost overruns: The project manager makes sure to control cost overruns. They are responsible for completing projects within the project budget.

If you are looking for a career, and not just a job, learn why you should become a project manager.

  • Strong labor market. .. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job growth between 2012 and 2020 is expected to be more than 19 percent. Why? The world is getting smaller thanks to technology that connects even the most distant corners of the planet. Bu
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People management is an important aspect of a PM job. Because Project Managers deal with a lot of people. ... Control of cost overruns: The project manager makes sure to control cost overruns. They are responsible for completing projects within the project budget.

If you are looking for a career, and not just a job, learn why you should become a project manager.

  • Strong labor market. .. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job growth between 2012 and 2020 is expected to be more than 19 percent. Why? The world is getting smaller thanks to technology that connects even the most distant corners of the planet. Businesses are expanding at a rapid rate and they need project managers to keep everything under control. Not to mention, many seasoned project managers will retire and their positions will need to be filled.
  • Competitive salary. ... Running a project is a lot like running a business. You have to manage a team, deal with clients, and make sure to keep everything on budget. The salary is not bad either. As with many careers, salaries vary by industry, location, and the amount of experience you have. Construction project managers earn an average of $ 74,000 while an IT project manager can earn $ 92,000 annually. For reference, the national average salary for project managers in general is $ 89,000.
  • Freedom to find a field that interests you. ... There are only a handful of careers that allow you to truly explore your passion. All industries carry out projects and these projects need someone to keep an eye on deadlines and budgets. That's where a project manager comes in. There are many different types of project managers, including: engineering, IT, healthcare, and construction.
  • Each project is unique. ... When you think of an office job, your mind can automatically paint the picture of someone mindlessly tapping on your keyboard in a cubicle. Not only do Project Managers face different challenges every day, they also have really diverse projects. After you have a few projects under your belt, you will feel like you can accomplish anything.
  • Make difference. .. Have you ever had the feeling that what you do at work doesn't really matter? You will not do it as a project manager. Each project will produce both tangible and intangible deliverables. Your boss will see how valuable you are to the company, and if you are looking for a new position, they will have plenty of data to support your strong performance.
  • Work with a diverse team. ... Project managers are fortunate to work with diverse teams. Because many office jobs today have teams working in a cohesive unit, it is rare for people to work outside of their "bubble." Project managers work with a variety of departments both within and outside of their organization. Depending on the project at hand, project managers can even work with teams from all over the world.
  • Learn something new every day. Whether you're the type of person who thrives in a classroom or prefers to learn by getting your hands dirty, there is something for everyone when it comes to project management. Every day you will improve your communication skills, perfect your management strategy and adapt to new technologies. You will also work on different projects, which will teach you more about the industry you are involved in. Do you want to further develop your project management skills? Earn a certificate in project management, which will help you prepare for the Project Management professional exam. Obtaining certification increases the salaries of project managers by approximately 16 percent.

For more information, contact Pankaj + 91–841842014.

Some team members can only participate in part of a project. Project managers have a unique role because they are responsible for overseeing all aspects of a project from start to finish. As a result, they have more ownership of the process.

Project managers can troubleshoot and manage team effectiveness because they can see the big picture. They can alternate between setting high-level expectations and working with the team to make sure details contribute to goals.

Project managers who have technical expertise also have the advantage of being able to

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Some team members can only participate in part of a project. Project managers have a unique role because they are responsible for overseeing all aspects of a project from start to finish. As a result, they have more ownership of the process.

Project managers can troubleshoot and manage team effectiveness because they can see the big picture. They can alternate between setting high-level expectations and working with the team to make sure details contribute to goals.

Project managers who have technical expertise also have the advantage of being able to become more intimately involved with the work that team members are doing, supporting their roles, and addressing issues as they arise.

Another benefit of being a project manager is that you can be an advocate for your team. Project managers can support all the people who make a project come true and be a voice for all teammates within a larger organization.

If you like variety with responsibilities, then Project Management is a great career for you. You can also expect a good, stimulated and challenging package to work as a project manager. However, it is satisfying and rewarding at the same time. However, you need to understand and assess yourself to find out if this is the right career choice for you, as it is stressful and demanding in the long run.

Take advantage of this webinar. All the best.

It's a good choice for someone with the mindset and ability to get the job done effectively. Many enter Project Management without understanding what is involved or what is expected of them and set themselves up for failure. Unfortunately, that reflects badly on the rest of the discipline.

As a project manager, you must be able to manage risk. That means setting the right expectations with your clients, stakeholders, and project team members. It implies being able to plan contingencies, react to changing situations and involve and motivate the necessary resources to execute them.

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It's a good choice for someone with the mindset and ability to get the job done effectively. Many enter Project Management without understanding what is involved or what is expected of them and set themselves up for failure. Unfortunately, that reflects badly on the rest of the discipline.

As a project manager, you must be able to manage risk. That means setting the right expectations with your clients, stakeholders, and project team members. It implies being able to plan contingencies, react to changing situations and involve and motivate the necessary resources to execute those contingency plans. It involves being able to communicate and translate between stakeholders and your team. You must be able to express things in terms that the company understands / considers valuable and translate business messages to the technical and functional members of your project team. You need to be able to manage a budget, manage people, manage requirements, know how to ask the right questions, and whose opinions and feedback you trust. You have to be able to do the right thing for the project,

I have known project managers who only do one or two of these things well and have had moderate success. However, it is the multifaceted individual who can balance all of these skills that really stands out.

If you like to organize and coordinate, appreciate challenge, variety, and problem solving, don't shy away from constructive confrontation, and can delegate to others even if you think you could do the job better than them, then there may be what it takes. to be a PM.

If you have to be in your hands everything, you cannot trust others to do their work, you need to have all the glory and recognition for yourself, you like to hide or avoid bad news or you are looking for a repetitive and mechanistic job. , then I would probably recommend not getting into project management. You may be able to survive, but you are unlikely to be happy.

In fact, I'm going to answer "Why did I choose NOT to become a project manager?", But from my answer you can see if project management is right for you.

Like any software developer, I was often responsible for small projects, either by one person or in conjunction with a few others. From that, and from the hours required studying the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), I was able to obtain my Project Management Professions (PMP) certification. But the key I learned along the way was that I didn't want to be a project manager.

In my opinion, a project manager is a senior manager

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In fact, I'm going to answer "Why did I choose NOT to become a project manager?", But from my answer you can see if project management is right for you.

Like any software developer, I was often responsible for small projects, either by one person or in conjunction with a few others. From that, and from the hours required studying the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), I was able to obtain my Project Management Professions (PMP) certification. But the key I learned along the way was that I didn't want to be a project manager.

In my opinion, a project manager is a senior manager. In any project larger than a few people, your job is not to do any of the work, but to make sure each of the team members is doing their job, and if not, to solve the problems (one or more of: time, resources, scope or quality) that prevent them from doing so. Your job is not to miss any little details that might prevent projects from being completed successfully. Tactic.

Why didn't you want to be a project manager? I don't want my job to be managing people and negotiating constraints with stakeholders. I like to understand a problem and determine the large-scale strategy to solve it. In other words, what I love is the specific role of Business Analyst, which is a key part of any project. The business analyst is responsible for speaking with all stakeholders to compile and summarize a concise set of requirements, propose potential solutions, determine an acceptable option, document the solution in detail, and then submit it to the implementation team. Then when the implementation team begins to see results, the business analyst returns to confirm that the results addressed the requirements,

So which one do you like the most? Strategy or details, ideas or implementation, solution or negotiation? This is how I would determine if I wanted to be a project manager. And that's why I decided no. I really admire people who love to manage people, track details, and negotiate, but it's not me.

These roles often cause confusion, even in smart tech companies. It's understandable: the words are only two letters apart. And in most organizations, responsibilities overlap in more ways than any other role. In some cases, the same person is the product manager and the project manager.

So what is the first step towards a successful working relationship if you are working in a team with product and project managers?

The key is to have clear boundaries (and cross them when necessary with intention and clear communication). When you internalize what each of you is responsible for,

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These roles often cause confusion, even in smart tech companies. It's understandable: the words are only two letters apart. And in most organizations, responsibilities overlap in more ways than any other role. In some cases, the same person is the product manager and the project manager.

So what is the first step towards a successful working relationship if you are working in a team with product and project managers?

The key is to have clear boundaries (and cross them when necessary with intention and clear communication). When you internalize what each of you is responsible for, you will better understand your responsibilities and points of intersection. This is how you collaborate and create great products.

Definition: product manager vs project manager

It is useful to begin by describing how we think about a product and a project.

A product is what you are providing to a group of users. It can be anything: a physical product that you are holding, a software application, or a service that you are providing.

In contrast, a project is a plan with a series of activities that has a defined outcome and a fixed start and end date. The project is complete when that result is achieved.

So let's say your product is a new mobile app. It can contain many projects before it is ready to be launched. All of these projects have their own unique starting and ending points. The mobile app, however, is a product that will continue to improve as long as it is sold to customers.

Paper

What is a product manager? Product managers are often described as the CEOs of their products. They set the strategy, prioritize launches, talk to customers, and clearly define features. Their efforts are continuous and involve managing the entire product life cycle. The goal of a product manager is to deliver a product that customers love.

What is a project manager? Project managers oversee a fixed project from start to finish. It can be a single project or a group of projects. Your job is to execute the strategy set by the product manager or leadership team. The goal of a project manager is to work with a larger team with a diverse set of skills and complete a project on time and on budget.

Each role performs unique functions to accomplish specific goals. So the next step is to break down the details of who does what, because this is where uncertainty and conflict often arise.

Responsibility

The product manager is responsible for establishing the product strategy. By having a “goal first” approach to managing and developing the product, great product managers can create initiatives to help achieve those goals.

This approach helps determine what functions need to be created to achieve those goals. Product managers must answer these three questions:

  • What problem does this solve?
  • What are you building?
  • What will be the benefits?

Product managers have:

  • Strategy
  • Releases
  • Ideation
  • Characteristics
  • Go to the market
  • Organizational training
  • Profit and loss

The project manager is usually less concerned with specific product goals. They are more focused on the project itself. A project manager takes initiatives and product characteristics to develop a schedule based on any potential constraints related to resources, risks, or scope.

Project managers must answer the questions:

  • What resources are needed?
  • When will the project be delivered?
  • Who will do what?

Project managers have:

  • Budget
  • Delivery
  • Means
  • Capacity
  • Organization of crossed teams
  • Problem solving
  • Status updates

Collaboration

Product managers and project managers work closely together and develop clear plans in high-performing organizations. And they both work with the broader product team and executive leaders.

The product manager collaborates with cross-functional teams on a daily basis regarding the future of the product: engineering, sales and marketing, customer success, etc. And since the product manager is responsible for the product throughout its life cycle, she will naturally be involved in any project. that refers to the product. So it's the product manager's job to define the scope of each specific project. She explains why these projects will achieve high-level goals for her product and business.

The project manager also works with the overall team, but is focused on making plans come true. And his work is more fixed in time. Manage an effort and once that project is complete, move on to organizing other tasks. For example, a project team could meet to tackle a UX redesign with a target date that is six months. The project manager will be concerned with the budget, resources, timing, and quality of that project. You will understand the many details of each project.

Each of the product and project managers performs unique functions. When lined up correctly, both can shine.

Product and project managers view the same work through different lenses. And that's good when you're trying to achieve something special, like bringing a new product to market like me. But they both work for the same team. And when they join forces to collaborate, everyone benefits and the company wins.

It is not dying, it is evolving. Project managers have always had a variety of delivery options available, and the good guys will pick the right option for the specific project or product they're working on. If a PM can only plan when there is a fixed finish date, he or she is not a very experienced PM.

In my first software project in 1995, we built a prototype of the system that evolved over many cycles. Even once we go into production, we deliver updates every few weeks over the course of a year, first taking them to a user test environment and then rolling them into production.

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It is not dying, it is evolving. Project managers have always had a variety of delivery options available, and the good guys will pick the right option for the specific project or product they're working on. If a PM can only plan when there is a fixed finish date, he or she is not a very experienced PM.

In my first software project in 1995, we built a prototype of the system that evolved over many cycles. Even once we go into production, we deliver updates every few weeks over the course of a year, first taking them to a user test environment and then rolling them out to production. It was not a wonderful startup, it was a large consulting company working with an even larger multinational.

I have done similar projects throughout my career. And I also worked on projects where we had to come up with a specific date for start-up, and managed the work on a more obvious timeline. 100% agile is not always the correct answer. (And 100% agile projects are pretty rare too. How often have you heard "we're making it agile, but ...").

I also don't think I've ever worked on a pure waterfall project. I have always felt free to choose the correct methods to handle the particular problem at hand and of course to calm and reassure the particular client I am working with.

Some clients demand more ceremony than others, in the same way that some Scrum Masters demand more ceremony than others. But don't confuse ceremony with method. And don't assume that anyone who knows how to use a risk register or create a milestone plan is a dinosaur.

You can probably find all the tips you need to become a product manager in this Quora question:

How do I become a product manager?

Go through that very long, well-trafficked question, then come back to some of my thoughts below specific to sellers.


Did you finish reading the other question?

Seriously?

Excellent!

Many of the answers in the other thread will have you start to fill the gap by doing the job of a Product Manager whenever you get the chance. If this is a possibility in your current job, great for you!

Otherwise, you will need to try one of these two paths:

  1. Moving to a sales-oriented company that values ​​salt
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You can probably find all the tips you need to become a product manager in this Quora question:

How do I become a product manager?

Go through that very long, well-trafficked question, then come back to some of my thoughts below specific to sellers.


Did you finish reading the other question?

Seriously?

Excellent!

Many of the answers in the other thread will have you start to fill the gap by doing the job of a Product Manager whenever you get the chance. If this is a possibility in your current job, great for you!

Otherwise, you will need to try one of these two paths:

  1. Moving to a sales-oriented company that values ​​sales experience so much that they are willing to hire someone with no product management experience for a PM position. Some examples include sales technology companies (CRM) or a product company where sales are the primary competitive function (B2B technology).
  2. Moving to a company where the sales staff work closely together and usually sign up to become a product manager. See if any of the existing PMs in the company have sales experience.

Finally, take advantage of one of the most valuable features of your job as a salesperson: your constant interactions with your users. Most salespeople will try to sell a product to their customers and if they fail, they will go back to the PM with everything the customer complained about and ask the PM to build it. However, the best salespeople are the ones who will look beyond customer complaints, internalize the underlying reasons they lost the deal, and provide PMs with user data instead of a list of feature suggestions. As a salesperson, practice user research and you'll be several steps closer to becoming a PM.

Good question, especially since a lot of people (who don't do either job) mix or confuse the two. (Take a look at Product Management Basics for Project Managers.) I divide
the work this way:
- Project managers are first concerned with resources, schedules, deadlines, and staffing issues. Their stated goal is to get everything we foolishly committed to shipped on time and with quality. They live through PERT charts or dependency trackers. They don't own the decision to send less compared to slip dates, but they get more and more creative in finding ways to do it all with less.

- product managers care more about

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Good question, especially since a lot of people (who don't do either job) mix or confuse the two. (Take a look at Product Management Basics for Project Managers.) I divide
the work this way:
- Project managers are first concerned with resources, schedules, deadlines, and staffing issues. Their stated goal is to get everything we foolishly committed to shipped on time and with quality. They live through PERT charts or dependency trackers. They don't own the decision to send less compared to slip dates, but they get more and more creative in finding ways to do it all with less.

- PRODUCT managers care more about what we commit to and in what order to tackle the additional work. While we would love for things to ship on time, we know that schedules primarily move in one direction (outward), so you are constantly struggling with the choice between shipping less, but on the planned release date (aka the launch train model) and submit the fully committed feature list later than promised (cascade or functional launch model). We own the explicit concessions between less now and more later. If we are lucky enough to have great project managers and great development teams, sometimes we can have everything as promised.

So if you've been hired as a product manager, you don't want to manage individual developers, sub-sprint-level scheduling, or detailed tool options, or the update status of the entire team task status.

All very well, but your boss may not get the most accurate distinctions. And in general, it's rude (especially in a startup) to complain that "that's not my job" or to get picky about titles. So you may need to educate yourself a bit. I would frame this as offsets (since product managers are adept at framing offsets!), For example:
- I could spend more time with clients and prospects, validating our latest product concepts; conduct competitive analysis and collect information on market prices / packages so that we can position our things correctly; looking forward in two sprints, making sure our epics are thoughtful and include clear and market-relevant results; keep the work to be done so that the team is not confused about what is coming next; create ROI tools so clients can justify paying money ...
OR
- I could be checking all the developers between stand-ups; plan the final test game for the next releases; update the status of the ticket; worry about team composition and skill gaps; run standing up; be creative when it comes to borrowing outside resources to cover vacations; counting how many licenses we need for key software tools ...

Smart managers will see your point and help you make decent decisions. ("We need you to do some of these project-like things for now, but we're planning on hiring a full-time project manager next quarter ...").
Some will not understand it, will refuse to see any distinctions or will simply tell you to do everything and let nothing slip away. You will be less happy with the second group, which can have an impact on how long you work for that particular person. But give it the benefit of the doubt, state your case thoughtfully and repeatedly, and keep a list of the things you can't do because you are also doing PROJECT work. It will come in handy when something on the "not done because it suddenly becomes strategic again" list.

As Chuck Cobb said in his great answer:

  • It depends on your interest, passion and talent. Some people are great at what they do because they are doing something they love by using their talents on a regular basis.
  • Think of two jobs ahead.

If earning potential is important to you, go for a consultancy. You will keep your skills sharp and develop your sales skills as well. Sales are one of those professions where the sky is the limit. Be a great salesperson in a lucrative industry (pharmaceuticals, high-end real estate, high-end portfolio manager, etc.) and your earning potential will be very high. Havin

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As Chuck Cobb said in his great answer:

  • It depends on your interest, passion and talent. Some people are great at what they do because they are doing something they love by using their talents on a regular basis.
  • Think of two jobs ahead.

If earning potential is important for you, then go to consulting. You'll keep your skills sharp and also build your sales skills. Sales is one of those professions where the sky is the limit. Be a great salesperson in a lucrative industry (pharmaceuticals, high end real estate, high end portfolio manager, etc) and your income potential will be very high. Having said that, it's not for everyone. If you don't have the personality for it, you'd likely be unhappy with this path.

Outside of sales, you could go to:

  • Product Manager. As Sergey Zelvenskiy mentions in his answer, this is a logical transition as you'd know the business really well and you can contribute greatly to the organization in this capacity.
  • Mr. Project Manager. In this level you'd be responsible for larger projects and at the same time be exposed to leadership and the ability to contribute to their decision making process.
  • Program Manager. This level is slightly higher than the Sr. Project Manager as far as exposure goes, except you'd be overseeing the entire portfolio instead of a single project.
  • Resource / Area Manager. You'll now be working with people and focusing on a particular area, instead of at an overall project level.
  • PMO / Business Director. If you want to stay in the PM area but are more interested in processes, standards, and periodically don't mind getting your hands dirty by managing a large enterprise project or two, then this is another potential step in your career ladder. Note: For this role, many companies require some years with resource management experience. If this is your goal, you would want to jump to the resource management side of the pool first to become a more competitive candidate down the road.

Managing a Project. Managing a Company. Leading a Project. Leading a Company.

The first thing to understand here is, why the doubt? Is there an understanding that getting certified makes you ineligible for another role in an organization? Frankly, I have not come across any credentials that would prevent me from occupying a position with the Company. Similarly, does earning the PMP certification increase your chances of assuming the CEO role? Is there a correlation?

There are many CEOs who are not PMP certified… and also many PMPs who are not yet CEOs.

The point to keep in mind is that

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Management of a project. Management of a company. Lead a project. Lead a company.

The first thing to understand here is, why the doubt? Is there an understanding that getting certified makes you ineligible for another role in an organization? Frankly, I have not come across any credentials that would prevent me from occupying a position with the Company. Similarly, does earning the PMP certification increase your chances of assuming the CEO role? Is there a correlation?

There are many CEOs who are not PMP certified… and also many PMPs who are not yet CEOs.

The point to note is that in order to be able to execute one's duties in a particular role, one needs to see if one qualifies (in terms of knowledge, skill, and attitude) or not. We need to see if we have the right knowledge and skills to perform as a PMP or CEO? CEO is the Chief Executive Officer in an organization. It is expected for a CEO to lead the company operations, whose scope go much beyond managing a domain specific project. However, there could be some overlapping skills to manage a project as well as a company - so that could come handy For example, resource management, watch on targets, achieving time bound goals, etc. It is important to note that the level of intensity of decisions around the similar sounding duties would be poles apart.

If we really come to think of it, one particular distinctive factor is, that the role of a CEO or a Project Manager necessarily requires one to have Leadership skills. But the size of two worlds is very different. While you have many projects within an organization, the reverse cannot be said.

Some notable common skills required for both profiles are (not an exhaustive list):

  1. Leadership skills
  2. Communication skills
  3. Influencing skills
  4. Financial skills
  5. Resource Management skills
  6. Time Management skills
  7. Visionary skills
  8. Crisis Management skills
  9. Negotiation skills

… We can go on and on.

We just need to see that the nature of these skills (and knowledge) are much different. Only the right attitude can bind these together.

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