Why is the hiring process so broken? Do companies really expect candidates to have all the required qualifications / experiences listed in the job description?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Luke Ross



Why is the hiring process so broken? Do companies really expect candidates to have all the required qualifications / experiences listed in the job description?

If you came to know about the work because it is 'posted' somewhere, then the work is not yours. I don't care if you have an MBA from Wharton, you won't get that job. The hiring manager knows who they want on board on their team BEFORE the ad runs on LinkedIn. The new hire already met with the manager at a dinner somewhere, exchanged contacts, and found out how they can be helpful to each other. The new hire has probably even given their notice to their current employer. Why the ad then? To comply with any intracorporate regulation of equity, equal opportunities, etc.

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If you came to know about the work because it is 'posted' somewhere, then the work is not yours. I don't care if you have an MBA from Wharton, you won't get that job. The hiring manager knows who they want on board on their team BEFORE the ad runs on LinkedIn. The new hire already met with the manager at a dinner somewhere, exchanged contacts, and found out how they can be helpful to each other. The new hire has probably even given their notice to their current employer. Why the ad then? To comply with any intracorporate regulation of equity, equal opportunities, etc. Whatever you do, your resume does not go out of the machine, that is, the software filter.

Nobody hires a CV or an online profile anymore. People hire who they know, who they trust, or who have heard great things from someone else they know and trust. Unless you know the guy making the decision, it's actually a "click" on the ad. Thanks for your interest in our company. We wish him the best in his future.

And why such ridiculous requirements in the job advertisement? This is because these are the types of requirements that make the already decided candidate the most suitable. You could probably get the job done without meeting all the specific requirements, or with your experience in a different but relevant business division / platform, etc. However, it does not meet the requirement. The requirement is tailored to you.

My boss hired me through some connections that I don't want to reveal. And after I joined, I found out that there was an advertisement for that position on the employer's website.

tl; dr - go ahead and apply because people hire the scorecard all the time.

the answer:

The root of this can be traced back to Brad Smart, who wrote a book called Top Grading which is a big part of the basis of recruitment based on the "scorecard" and the nomenclature of "players a" versus "players b" , which are an evaluation of a candidate for a scorecard.

And this has increasingly become a heuristic.

The way you think about this recruiting method is that if you are hiring a swimmer, you can hire based on the "role setting" or a "scorecard" and the candidate's alignment with that role setting or scorecard.

A role setting might sound like "Comp

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tl; dr - go ahead and apply because people hire the scorecard all the time.

the answer:

The root of this can be traced back to Brad Smart, who wrote a book called Top Grading which is a big part of the basis of recruitment based on the "scorecard" and the nomenclature of "players a" versus "players b" , which are an evaluation of a candidate for a scorecard.

And this has increasingly become a heuristic.

The way you think about this recruiting method is that if you are hiring a swimmer, you can hire based on the "role setting" or a "scorecard" and the candidate's alignment with that role setting or scorecard.

A role setting may sound like "Competitive Spirit", "Able to swim three strokes", "Coach".

Whereas the scorecard lineup may sound like "Three Olympic gold medals on different strokes" and "Coached by three world-class coaches."

If you hire with the scorecard you get an Olympic swimmer, while if you hire with a role adjustment you can either get an Olympic swimmer or you can have my son (who is 7 years old, has been taking swimming lessons since he was 1 and hates to lose).

The key point that companies (especially smart ones) realize over time is that sometimes you need an Olympic athlete tomorrow because you need someone who will swim 100 meters in a given time and sometimes you just need someone who can start. swimming. Related point: Olympians are often divas and come with a lot of luggage and requirements.

But I have seen a lot in my company that we will take a risk with someone creative, so I think that if you are creative and persistent you can get a job anywhere.

It is an urban myth that a candidate has all the chances on the walls and the necessary skills for any position. If a candidate had those skills, that job would not last more than a week. Generally, companies publish a description of an ideal candidate. The role and goal of an applicant is to convince the hiring manager that they are or will be the right candidate for that position, even if there is not a complete combination of skills and qualifications.

In my career I have obtained three jobs in which I did not fulfill eight out of 10 competitions. it's possible.

Forgive my grammar mistakes, spelling

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It is an urban myth that a candidate has all the chances on the walls and the necessary skills for any position. If a candidate had those skills, that job would not last more than a week. Generally, companies publish a description of an ideal candidate. The role and goal of an applicant is to convince the hiring manager that they are or will be the right candidate for that position, even if there is not a complete combination of skills and qualifications.

In my career I have obtained three jobs in which I did not fulfill eight out of 10 competitions. it's possible.

Please excuse my grammar, spelling, or punctuation errors due to my use of speech-to-text software.

To answer your question: "Why do companies seek experience only on potential and attributes?"

Because it is safe.

If you put yourself in the shoes of a recruiter and you would have to pay money to hire someone. I'd rather hire someone you know can already do the job, rather than find someone to train.

You should try to sit on the other side of the table and experience what it is like to be the one to pay someone to do your homework.

That said, if you can talk to the executive, you need to make it clear and try to convince yourself that you can get the job done. Highlight your attributes and how that is cru

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To answer your question: "Why do companies seek experience only on potential and attributes?"

Because it is safe.

If you put yourself in the shoes of a recruiter and you would have to pay money to hire someone. I'd rather hire someone you know can already do the job, rather than find someone to train.

You should try to sit on the other side of the table and experience what it is like to be the one to pay someone to do your homework.

That said, if you can talk to the executive, you need to make it clear and try to convince yourself that you can get the job done. Highlight your attributes and how crucial it is for you to get the job.

Let me put it this way: Some employers need to "go overboard" when it comes to their job posting. Putting the highest marks on the ad is a strategy to find the right candidate. It doesn't mean you should stick to all of those, although some actually wanted you to. But it is better to write down all the necessary requirements or work experience than to stick to the minimum.

The best answer to this question is that IQ tests for employment have faced some opposition on absurd grounds of racial discrimination. If it weren't for this, they could simply have someone's IQ to know if they are going to master the job in a month or if they will struggle to keep up in the future.

That is why entrepreneurs have to resort to other tactics to get some idea of ​​whether someone is going to be good or not. If the person has already done that work, it is a sign that they can do it.

It's disturbing because it doesn't match the learning curve of real work, as everyone progresses differently based on their personal experience, skill mix, and the amount of training they receive.

The fact that so many HR "professionals" completely ignore the training component (wow, showing them everything and preparing their paperwork is apparently the important part, not learning the actual job today) makes job postings are especially absurd when asking about people who don't. There are generally those who can do the job without training.

Each company is different as are the jobs within it,

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It's disturbing because it doesn't match the learning curve of real work, as everyone progresses differently based on their personal experience, skill mix, and the amount of training they receive.

The fact that so many HR "professionals" completely ignore the training component (wow, showing them everything and preparing their paperwork is apparently the important part, not learning the actual job today) makes job postings are especially absurd when asking about people who don't. There are generally those who can do the job without training.

Every company is different, as are the jobs within it, people with enough experience and prior training to get the job done right away are routinely told NOT to do most of what they know because it is too different from practices standard at the new employer.

HR is usually entered straight from college with just one or a few courses on the subject in the middle of a general degree in business, communications, psychology, education, etc., but there is no experience beyond summer jobs at the high school and college about the actual work that needs to be done. done. That makes them especially susceptible to including everything they've heard or imagined in the criteria, so the job description would take 2-5 completely different middle-aged humans (think of the entire Justice League as the job description and Robin's salary package as the offer). ) to cover with too low or too high compensation (randomly and based on the salary of others in that hierarchy).

Then when they realize they have to fill the position that they have made impossible to fill, the interviews gradually skip most of that and eventually hire someone that the interviewers liked viscerally but didn't quite fit the bill. most criteria. The unskilled person discovers that there is no plan or resources to train them for the job, so they will have to educate themselves and mostly brag. Companies routinely implemented in-house training plans and programs for people across the company, not just management and sales, until the 1970s and it worked extremely well, so it puzzles me why it faded into downsizing. costs and turnover.

You can definitely apply for jobs that require a number of “N” years of experience, even if you haven't worked for that many years. Any manager will know that years of work experience do not directly correlate with job competence. There are many people with 20 years of work experience who perform less effectively than someone with 2 years of work experience. In short, yes, you should apply if you feel like you will be able to get the job done.

Where he is falling short is saying that "I have no work experience." Think about it from the employer's perspective. Employers when hiring are thi

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You can definitely apply for jobs that require a number of “N” years of experience, even if you haven't worked for that many years. Any manager will know that years of work experience do not directly correlate with job competence. There are many people with 20 years of work experience who perform less effectively than someone with 2 years of work experience. In short, yes, you should apply if you feel like you will be able to get the job done.

Where he is falling short is saying that "I have no work experience." Think about it from the employer's perspective. Employers when hiring are thinking, "I need someone with X skills to do Y". "Work experience" is just a general term that is used, when hiring, to ask if the candidate has had any experience that has helped them acquire the "X skills", the skills that the employer needs. If you say “I don't have work experience”, this is equivalent to saying “I don't have the skills you are looking for”. This is why you don't get a callback.

Remember, you are qualified for a job if you have the skills necessary to get the job done, or if you have the ability to quickly learn the skills needed to get the job done. This is what you have to broadcast on your phone screens. When asked if you have work experience, talk about experiences in which you have acquired the required skills (even if they are not paid work!) And / or experiences in which you have acquired tangential skills and then present a case that you will be able to learn . the necessary skills quickly and effectively.

The most important thing an employer looks for when hiring is 1) do you have the skills I need to get the job done? 2) can you learn the skills I need quickly to get the job done and 3) do you really want to work for my company? So on your phone screen, if any, also mention why you are super interested in joining the company. When doing these things, you should be flipping through the phone screens, good luck!

This provides the company with presentations containing the best and brightest resumes. Why do you ask?

Simple.

College students who do more than attend college, study, etc., volunteer for various committees, clubs, or charities. It is these same students who obtain an internship at a prestigious company in their chosen field.

The internship is truly a honeymoon between the student and the company. Introduces the student to the business and sets expectations.

I worked for Deloitte. Our interns turned out to be some of the best new hires I've ever come across.

Employee selection

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This provides the company with presentations containing the best and brightest resumes. Why do you ask?

Simple.

College students who do more than attend college, study, etc., volunteer for various committees, clubs, or charities. It is these same students who obtain an internship at a prestigious company in their chosen field.

The internship is truly a honeymoon between the student and the company. Introduces the student to the business and sets expectations.

I worked for Deloitte. Our interns turned out to be some of the best new hires I've ever come across.

Employee selection is a long process for some companies that have a long-term vision.

"Unreasonable" work experience only affects those who do not take the initiative to go further.

Of course, there is another perspective to take.

Let's say you're in a dead-end job and decide you want to become a computer programmer (or fill in the blank with the job you want).

There are numerous boot camps, community college programs, and online training or certifications available.

You attend boot camp, work on real projects, build a portfolio of work on github with your name on it.

You have no "experience", but you have proof of knowledge.

This is what companies are looking for. Someone who will go the extra mile.

And, of course, there are some companies that are unreasonable in their demands.

What I have seen are job applications containing "must do" and then "nice" experience points. For example, if I am trying to fill a position on my team for an evaluator of a specific system, the candidate should have experience with the system and perhaps an automated testing tool. It is good to have a Security + certificate (required by the client) or some other certification.

Good luck!

My experience on the university campus, I was rejected by one of the best banks in the world and the reason they gave me was that I am overqualified.

My interview went very well and I was very sure that I was going to get in safely, I answered all the questions that they asked me and I got into the core of the technology that they asked me. From DBMS to JAVA I gave them all.
But I was rejected.

For obvious reasons, I asked the interviewer "I'm just an engineer, I'm not even an engineer yet, one more semester to go. You've come to my campus to hire, so you know there will only be engineers and how can I do it?

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My experience on the university campus, I was rejected by one of the best banks in the world and the reason they gave me was that I am overqualified.

My interview went very well and I was very sure that I was going to get in safely, I answered all the questions that they asked me and I got into the core of the technology that they asked me. From DBMS to JAVA I gave them all.
But I was rejected.

For obvious reasons I asked the interviewer, "I'm just an engineer, I'm not even an engineer yet, one more semester to go. You've come to my campus to hire, so you know there will only be engineers and how can you call me overqualified." ? "He was not obliged to give me any reason, but fortunately he answered my question and clarified my doubt in a logical way.

His answer:

You answered all the questions I asked you, not one was wrong, your technical skills in terms of practical as well as conceptual knowledge are very strong, but I am hiring you for a bank. Try as we may, we won't have any more technical work at all costs, and from my 20-year hiring experience I can say that a candidate like you who is that technically sound and enthusiastic about new technologies will tend to leave my company. within a year because your qualifications far exceed the job requirements. A job in the bank will not satisfy your needs, you will not work properly or you will quit, you will get bored, you will hate what you are doing and you will leave my company and to replace you, I will have to continue again. hiring, that wastes my time, yours and my company money. So I'm going to hire a guy who gave 5 right and 5 wrong answers to get me in shape for the job that I have. It will save me money, time and your time. Also, you will like your work that you don't have to think much about and my company work will get done. I'm sorry but what I require right now, you don't fit into that category so I can't hire you. But as an engineer he is highly qualified and I am sure any technical company would hire him in a minute.

I found that logic correct, either I was excellent at managing people, or this is the answer to your question. : D: D

Welcome to Graduate Catch-22! You have just spent 3-5 years in college working right now, but you don't have the experience you need for a job. You need a job to get the experience.

  • Intern: Yes, you can actually do an internship after graduating from some companies. Just keep in mind that you won't be paying the bills, but it will help you gain valuable experience.
  • Volunteer - Volunteer your skills at the local charity of your choice. You may not be doing anything but cold calling, but it can definitely help build your customer relationship experience. If you are lucky, you may really be able to develop your skills. I was ab
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Welcome to Graduate Catch-22! You have just spent 3-5 years in college working right now, but you don't have the experience you need for a job. You need a job to get the experience.

  • Intern: Yes, you can actually do an internship after graduating from some companies. Just keep in mind that you won't be paying the bills, but it will help you gain valuable experience.
  • Volunteer - Volunteer your skills at the local charity of your choice. You may not be doing anything but cold calling, but it can definitely help build your customer relationship experience. If you are lucky, you may really be able to develop your skills. I was able to create a brochure for a charity and it was an experience that I was able to take advantage of before I was hired.
  • Get an unlikely experience: Did you design a newsletter in college? Did you teach other children? Did you act in a play? All of that can be used as experience in everything from creating a newsletter to public speaking. It won't count like four years of experience, but again, it's something.
  • Update Your Resume - Take a few hours to really update your resume. I have seen many new graduates submit resumes that were just awful. Nothing shows more inexperience than a bad resume. That means there is no goal, no hobby section, and no wasted space. Look online for some inspiration and go for it! Use those power verbs to your advantage.
  • Apply for Entry-Level Jobs - These are jobs you probably think you're too good at. It's okay. Most new graduates think that way too. Once an intern thought he could apply for a directorial position with only 6 months of experience in the field and a college degree. This is really the area to start in when looking for work. You may have already been looking in this area, but you will be surprised at the number of new graduates who are not looking for entry-level positions.
  • Participate in professional groups: If you are in marketing, find a marketing group to participate in. If you're in accounting, find an accounting group to participate in. Start building your relationship with other people in your field and get the networking started.
  • If you are a writer, offer to be a guest blogger; They won't pay you, but you are trying to build your portfolio and gain experience. The more you write, the more you will learn and get your name out there.
  • Develop Your LinkedIn Page - Don't Forget To Use LinkedIn To Your Advantage!
  • Get a retail job - It's best to gain experience in your field, but working a retail job won't necessarily hinder your growth. It can be helpful if you are interning or volunteering to work in retail for extra money. Also, you can usually put a twist on your retail experience, especially if you've been appointed as a manager, to help develop your expertise to a level that catches the attention of the hiring manager.

Whatever you do, don't come back just to get a masters degree. If you think you are struggling to gain experience now, you will really struggle when you have your MBA but no experience. Basically you will need too high a salary for entry level positions (which you need) but too inexperienced for other positions. Also, typically, your future employer will have a college tuition program that will pay for part of that MBA.

In my situation, I was lucky. I had a really great internship that gave me great experience, and I had spent a lot of time in college already working in areas related to the field. However, to get my first job, I needed to improve my skills and show that I had what it took.

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