Why is Steve Jobs the best CEO?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Leon Wilkinson



Why is Steve Jobs the best CEO?

Steve Jobs 'the best CEO of all time'

"Steve is the most remarkable person I have ever met," said Trip Hawkins, founder of Electronic Arts.

"I consider him the greatest CEO in history because he bailed out Apple and Pixar at the same time, and they were both big changes," he said.

Hawkins, who now leads the Digital Chocolate mobile gaming team, said Jobs has "defined our generation and if the history books only mention one person from this period, it will be him."

"The world owes a huge debt to Steve," said Steve Perlman, creator of Apple's original QuickTime player and now CEO of clou.

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Steve Jobs 'the best CEO of all time'

"Steve is the most remarkable person I have ever met," said Trip Hawkins, founder of Electronic Arts.

"I consider him the greatest CEO in history because he bailed out Apple and Pixar at the same time, and they were both big changes," he said.

Hawkins, who now leads the Digital Chocolate mobile gaming team, said Jobs has "defined our generation and if the history books only mention one person from this period, it will be him."

"The world owes a huge debt to Steve," said Steve Perlman, creator of Apple's original QuickTime player and now CEO of cloud gaming group OnLive.

The CEO is just a designation that has been given to him, but the question should be why is Steve Jobs the most creative man of all time? And the answer would be that he is bored of doing normal things. He used to yell at people and throw phones and iPods if he didn't like it, everyone thought he was rude and arrogant, but he wanted better and see now where the apple is.

Hope you found this answer helpful.

Who said? Did you do your research well? Did more than 80% of the total world population say that? Did you submit a survey?

Hahaha, I really enjoyed how this question was phrased.

What does a CEO really do at work?

Obviously we write answers to Quora questions!

Just kidding ... it's a bit more complicated than that.

Every day, my main mission is to ensure that my team is taking the right steps towards the big picture.

Basically, I want to make sure that the work we are doing is aligned with our vision. I imagine this is the case for many CEOs.

To give you a better understanding of what this entails, let's review a typical day in my life.

My morning starts with a gigantic cup of coffee, the elixir of startup fou

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Hahaha, I really enjoyed how this question was phrased.

What does a CEO really do at work?

Obviously we write answers to Quora questions!

Just kidding ... it's a bit more complicated than that.

Every day, my main mission is to ensure that my team is taking the right steps towards the big picture.

Basically, I want to make sure that the work we are doing is aligned with our vision. I imagine this is the case for many CEOs.

To give you a better understanding of what this entails, let's review a typical day in my life.

My morning starts with a gigantic cup of coffee, the elixir of startup founders everywhere!

I start the day with a daily scrum with my team. We discuss high priority tasks, assign responsibilities, and focus on removing any blockages that impede work flow so we can get on track and move forward.

Doing that last part is absolutely essential. And not just for that day, but for the week ahead as well - tackling obstacles before they become bigger, more urgent problems saves incredible amounts of resources.

Organizing your goal, the obstacles in your path, and the steps you need to take to overcome them is the moment when your idea becomes more than a thought - it begins to become a reality.

After the scrum, my day to day changes. Possibilities range from meeting with clients, setting milestones for new agendas, and executing what needs to happen to move projects forward.

But outside of these details, a substantial part of my day is spent taking stock of current efforts.

Not only do I do this to make sure our customers are happy, but also to make sure that we stay true to Dogtown Media's vision: not only creating maximum impact and value, but also producing products with a purpose.

As the leader of your company, it is imperative that you set the tone for your company's strategic vision.

This is the only way to stay on course for progress. If your company leaders are not aligned on where you are going, it will be impossible to get this message across to your employees.

Because your vision is not consistent, your employees' perspective on the company will not be consistent either.

To drive optimized results, you absolutely must share your beliefs, goals, and strategies with your team so that each member can become a stakeholder in the company's efforts.

All of this can be done through regular check-ins with your team, your leadership, and yourself.

Remember: you are the captain of your ship. And it takes continuous course correction to get where you want to go.

You'd be surprised how many startups drop out of perspective checks after launch. Unfortunately for them, it can be a fatal mistake.

Never give up on regular checkups. It's the only way to know if your product is actually solving valid pain points. It reminds you who you are building your product for. And it keeps you aligned with your vision and mission.

It is very beneficial to take the time to ask yourself how you could do better.

By knowing your product's place in the world and the challenge it solves, you can tailor solutions to your customers' problems on a deeper level than ever before.

Many CEOs (myself included) pack our days with so much that it can be tempting to put this kind of thinking on the back burner. But I always make sure to prioritize it.

Speaking of 'packed', it is important to consider the breaks!

Without adequate rest, your efficiency and effectiveness will decrease.

To break my busy schedule and keep my mind from overloading, I spend five to ten minutes meditating every afternoon.

As you probably know, startup entrepreneurship and culture have become very popular in recent years.

And whatever post you're reading, a common theme you'll come across is the glorification of routine.

Many articles and people these days discuss how you must be relentless in your searches. In your perspective, this amounts to putting in 16 hours a day every day, working on weekends, and sacrificing whatever bits of personal life you may be clinging to.

Do not do that.

This kind of nonstop mindset couldn't be further from the truth if your goal is to optimize productivity.

It is a sure way to induce exhaustion. Entrepreneurship is a marathon, not a sprint. Therefore, you must plan accordingly.

Make sure you take a break regularly. Not only will this allow you to work faster and smarter, it won't feel like a machine. Remember, entrepreneurship is a human endeavor.

After taking care of the final loose ends, I make sure to write down the three most important accomplishments of the day before retiring for the night.

Your gratitude for your current situation is deeply powerful in shaping your future.

Not only does it affect the next day, but it also cascades into the following week, month, and year.

Always take a second to reflect on your accomplishments and pat yourself on the back.

For me, it's a great reminder of why I do what I do.

Taking a second to look back does wonders to rekindle the spark and passion you felt when you first embarked on your entrepreneurial adventure.

So there you have it. A day in the life of a CEO.

As you can see now, the vast majority of my day is making sure my team is on track towards our vision.

I hope this helps!

The best CEO ever? well, it depends on the parameters you set to judge him as CEO.

Let's assume some parameters and see how you defined those parameters with your work -

Leadership: He was undoubtedly a charismatic leader. With his unique style of operation, he did some of the most fascinating things inside and outside of Apple.
The very fact that he could resurrect Apple from bankruptcy to become one of the most successful companies in human history is itself testament to the fact that he was a visionary and charismatic leader.

strategy: knew exactly what to do to

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The best CEO ever? well, it depends on the parameters you set to judge him as CEO.

Let's assume some parameters and see how you defined those parameters with your work -

Leadership: He was undoubtedly a charismatic leader. With his unique style of operation, he did some of the most fascinating things inside and outside of Apple.
The very fact that he could resurrect Apple from bankruptcy to become one of the most successful companies in human history is itself testament to the fact that he was a visionary and charismatic leader.

strategy - he knew exactly what to do to take on the big giants like IBM in the 1980s, Sony in the 2000s, and Microsoft and Google in the first decade of the 21st century.
apple under created ads and campaigns like "think differently"

and "dinner bowl commercial" -

These strategies not only worked, they changed the way people view the industry and the apple as a whole.

Influence: Under his command, Apple changed the way people use the personal computer, the way they listen to music, the way people use phones, and brought tablets to the masses.
His contribution to different industries, such as the PC industry, the music industry (iPod and iTunes), animated films and consumer electronics as a whole, is unmatched considering the time (years 70 to 2010) in the that worked where the technology was not as good as it is now.

we can take numbers from those parameters and talk about it and the list will go on and on.

Steve Jobs literally brought revolution to almost each and every industry he worked for.

Now compare them to all the existing and past CEOs of different companies and check if anyone matches those credentials.

This question comes up sickeningly many times, mostly from inexperienced engineers who want to support their 'engineers == only valuable resource in a company's worldview'.

The fact is, actual products are not just a function of good engineering. Engineers work in technology. Technology solves problems. Issues must be framed in the proper context and must target the right market opportunities and what are colloquially described as "pain points." The person who can frame issues, provide context, and identify market opportunities is a genius god.

Engineers are lousy in the frame

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This question comes up sickeningly many times, mostly from inexperienced engineers who want to support their 'engineers == only valuable resource in a company's worldview'.

The fact is, actual products are not just a function of good engineering. Engineers work in technology. Technology solves problems. Issues must be framed in the proper context and must target the right market opportunities and what are colloquially described as "pain points." The person who can frame issues, provide context, and identify market opportunities is a genius god.

Engineers are lousy at framing problems. They are good at solving problems when their limitations are well defined. That's what Jobs did: He framed problems that engineers later solved. He discovered the opportunities and possible solutions that could be generated. And it did so with very little evidence based on "market analysis." Then he also created the marketing strategies.

Quantitative information is easy to work with. It's easy to make decisions based on focus groups and how much investment you have invested in a technology. It's easy to say 'we've invested 0.5 billion in creating this technology, our products will now have to ship next month with this feature to justify the investments.' But it is very difficult to make the market respond to your decisions. So if you are a mature adult who doesn't see why someone who could handle all these confusing, non-quantitative decisions, and create products and product categories out of them, is not a genius, frankly you are an idiot.

Please note this comes from an engineer who is not affiliated with Apple, but who works in the consumer electronics industry. I am grateful to Jobs because he only created value not only for Apple but for the entire telecommunications industry. The whole app store idea is great. The number of smartphone software / device vendors, the trillion dollar industry valuation (where none existed before 2007) can be practically geared towards the iPhone.

Was he a technician? - He wasn't a guy who would sit around and create a pros / cons list for using InvenSense vs Analog device IMUs. I would not work on finding the best location for the antennas. But he (and the Industrial Design group) would commission PD (production design group) to figure out the best location while meeting the performance and design criteria, and PD would distribute the problem to the required groups.

Here's something I wrote a couple of months ago on Wired / Disqus. "How Steve Jobs Made the iPad Succeed When All Other Tablets Failed | Opinion | WIRED"

In a typical modern technology company, engineers tell product designers what things are possible, then designers figure out what features make sense and can sell and prepare final orders for engineers. What Jobs, and only Jobs, could do was be the only designer who made the decisions and dictated the terms to the engineers. People took him seriously just because of who he was in the seventies and eighties, because he "fought for the users." And that's also why everyone tuned in every time he spoke.

This gave Jobs that magical power of being able to convince people why they were actually tuning in and listening. No other engineer or designer can do that. Maybe Gates today. Or maybe Zuckerberg / Dorsey in the next 20 years (I bet Zuck).

So the article explains that critical point well: the iPad succeeds only thanks to Jobs's so-called RDF. There are so many companies that have innovative products and true visionaries to lead them, but none can sell the volumes that Apple has or create the excitement that Apple could.
Unfortunately, Jobs no longer exists. The aura still lingers, but the lack of enthusiasm for the mac pro (probably the most advanced design in desktop computing in the last decade), the meh attitude towards the 5c, the incremental design of the tablet all point to people They no longer tune as much or as hard. When you hear rumors about what Apple is doing and what other companies (Big G, Samsung, Microsoft) are doing, I don't get the feeling that people care that much - it goes back to the 'cheaper and better defined sales' of 1990. -It was 2005.

What I really thank Jobs for is that not only did he create a market for Apple, but he took the brunt of justifying to the masses WHY they need those rather esoteric / expensive products in the first place. That made a profit for Apple, but it also created a market for Android and Samsung. It's doubtful that smartphones will see the adoption rates they had, without Apple + Jobs leading the charge.

And here we are talking about laptops every day. But WHO is going to sell them?


I am a technology principle (h / w) in a small HCI company. So I hear from a lot of people who justify the investment in their 'innovations' and I also have to justify the investment in technology for my group. You won't believe how many people start their speech with the premise that 'smartphones / devices exist and will be sold'. Millions. Forever'.

But if you examine the history of that premise, you'll notice that Apple didn't 'invent' smartphones, and pre-iPhone devices would have low sales even at half the price of the iPhone. Articles from the 2005 era would invariably ask the question "what do we need it for?" And that was a very solid answer and difficult to justify. The only devices that seemed to be sold were the 'cheap / rugged / high call quality / robust interface' types, the RATIONAL options.

So before the iPhone, no company wanted to risk deep investments in these expensive fashion / consumer goods units that had a difficult sales record.

But in 2007, almost all companies were surprised by the strong volumes on the iPhone, because buying a $ 400 iPhone in 2007 was an IRRATIONAL choice.

So how can you justify that choice? Super awesome technology? Brilliant OS design? Marketing out of the world? Well, I don't think so. These strategies were available and recreated by Motorola / Samsung / Blackberry / Google / MS. If it was just a matter of capital investments, these companies would have easily outperformed Apple in 2008.

So something sets the iPhone apart. (Sure you could say a great "design", but the design is subjective, it should not be used as an argument. For my part, I think the design of the iPhone is fine, nothing dazzling)

And that's my point. Apple, as a company, is not so special: the engineers / designers are fine, the same ones found at Google / MS / Samsung; Many new H / w people at Apple are ex-HP / Frog / Agilent / Avago hires. You'll notice that the Cook-Apple news is pretty much the same as the Google / MS news and generally sounds like "working on the most innovative technology ever."

Then something has changed. Somehow Apple is no longer differentiating itself. You don't hear about the police raiding people's houses. You don't hear that Google maps are ugly or that you hold the phone badly. You listen to rationality. You hear an apology to PRC. You heard about protecting LGBT rights in the workplace. So what has changed?

Why does Google have to work hard to justify Google Glass? Why is Apple working on something exactly like everyone says it should? Why is Apple predictable? Why would you buy a phone device that costs $ 300 when it differs mostly aesthetically from another (a bit unreliable) phone that costs $ 100? Why would you pay $ 200 more for something that you know won't last more than three years anyway?

These are rhetorical questions. My take on the answer is above.
Now my company wants to sell something totally disruptive, let's say something like Glass. I don't see any solid reason why people should suddenly start adopting this new device. I also didn't see why people made the irrational switch to smartphones. But can I justify the lack of compelling reasons to sell Glass by comparing it to the irrational switch to smartphones?

So I thank Jobs. Created a segment out of nowhere. It could irrationally justify the need for expensive smartphones and hardware. And today, it has around a hundred companies in that segment, all justifying their investment with the argument "Smartphones ... sell".

So most of the other answers say “WTF? No. "Weren't enough for you?

Yes, I notice the academic saying "just because he married, had multiple children, and had various long-term affairs with women, and dies married and has children is not a reliable indicator that he is heterosexual," and that statement is true at its greatest. part. sense of rational thinking and examples of homosexuals locked up throughout history, but he is also quite deaf to Jobs' real-life lived experience, a life massively watched by as many people as the average person, surrounded by a medium that just love a

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So most of the other answers say “WTF? No. "Weren't enough for you?

Yes, I notice the academic saying "just because he married, had multiple children, and had various long-term affairs with women, and dies married and has children is not a reliable indicator that he is heterosexual," and that statement is true at its greatest. part. sense of rational thinking and examples of homosexuals locked up throughout history, but he is also quite deaf to Jobs' real-life lived experience, a life massively watched by as many people as the average person, surrounded by a medium that I just love a little drama to sell media to people asking questions like yours.

Or maybe you think it's because he handed over the reins of Apple to a gay man, who continued to run Apple successfully for 5 years after Jobs' death? Are you imagining hot homosexual sex scenes on the boardroom table, followed by secret videoconference meetings with your Illuminati cohorts? I'm gay and I'm not, I'm not seeing that.

Having been a casual but long-time observer of Apple, there has never been the slightest tick in my gaydar about Steve Jobs.

First of all, I really need to highlight the negative connotations of this question.

It implies that the questioner feels that Cook is lacking in some way compared to Jobs.

So let's overlook the dubious credibility of that judgment and get straight to the big picture of this.

Today's Apple has become a far superior organization than Jobs, and I would like to think that no one would have been more proud of that than Jobs.

It was one of Jobs' wishes that in growing Apple beyond him, his successors should not waste their energies and talents doubting themselves and hampered by the news.

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First of all, I really need to highlight the negative connotations of this question.

It implies that the questioner feels that Cook is lacking in some way compared to Jobs.

So let's overlook the dubious credibility of that judgment and get straight to the big picture of this.

Today's Apple has become a far superior organization than Jobs, and I would like to think that no one would have been more proud of that than Jobs.

One of Jobs's wishes was that by growing Apple beyond him, his successors would not waste their energies and talents doubting themselves and hampered by the notion of "What would Steve do?"

Steve was in the mood for a simple crazy idea.

People can change the world.

His vision for Apple was for them to build products that allow people to explore and expand their potential.

But he learned through harsh lessons that in order for Apple to fulfill its role, they had to stay in the game. Research and development require funding and resources. It was not enough to have a vision, they also have to be commercially viable.

The goal is not money, but money is a requirement for the goal, so money and goal must become one.

Tim Cook's superpower is operations and logistics. He was the man Steve went to get it. And for doing it well.

Jobs's superpower was his precision in articulating thought and his modest showmanship.

Combined, they gave him the ability to create his legendary "Reality Distortion Field," an idea credited with having evolved from his encounter with Robert Friedland at Reed College, with whom he shared an interest in Eastern philosophy and the power of mind.

The reality distortion field allowed Jobs to help people shift their mindset from "it can't be done" to "how it can be done," a philosophy with the potential to create miracles or mistakes in equal measure, with its greatest error. sadly emerging as his attempts to self-treat his cancer, which ultimately led to his death.

Cook is not Jobs. That's why Jobs chose it. Cook has his own vision of empowering people to change the world. Cook is what Apple needed for its next stage of growth. Cook was Job's last "most ... thing."

Cook has done an outstanding job of growing Apple's core vision of:

People can change the world.

And he's done it by tapping into his own passions and vision of what that means, free from the distraction of "What would Steve do?" Just as Steve hoped, and believes, he would.

If we go back to that vision for Apple:

If Steve's focus were:

to build the products that would allow people to explore and expand their potential.

So Tim's approach seems more:

to improve products that would allow people to explore and expand their potential.

Oh, I'm sure it did, at least a little bit. Meditating was one of those '70s bucket list activities that everyone, Californians at least, enjoyed. The list went something like this:

Adopt the exotic oriental religion (Buddhism, Transcendentalism, Hinduism, etc.).

Buy used Volkswagen Beetle or Bus.

Smoking mystical psychotropic drugs (peyote, mushrooms, mescaline, various opium concoctions, et al).

Join the cult (est, Laughing Men, Scientology, whatever).

Adopt a strange diet (vegetarian, fruit, grapefruit, etc.).

Lessons in yoga, meditation, acupuncture, etc.

These activities were often followed by:

Personal ba

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Oh, I'm sure it did, at least a little bit. Meditating was one of those '70s bucket list activities that everyone, Californians at least, enjoyed. The list went something like this:

Adopt the exotic oriental religion (Buddhism, Transcendentalism, Hinduism, etc.).

Buy used Volkswagen Beetle or Bus.

Smoking mystical psychotropic drugs (peyote, mushrooms, mescaline, various opium concoctions, et al).

Join the cult (est, Laughing Men, Scientology, whatever).

Adopt a strange diet (vegetarian, fruit, grapefruit, etc.).

Lessons in yoga, meditation, acupuncture, etc.

These activities were often followed by:

Personal bankruptcy (learning to float, for example, or subsisting on a caloric intake of 1K per year is EXPENSIVE).

Frequent automotive breakdowns.

Seizures

Divorce.

Malnutrition.

Muscle spasms

Jobs reportedly didn't suffer much from any of these, so we can assume that he was not only smart but lucky when he was younger.

Rick Chapman
Editor-in-Chief and Editor, Softletter
Author: Selling Steve Jobs' Liver. A Story of Startups, Innovation, and Connectivity in the Clouds "
" In Pursuit of Stupidity: Over 20 Years of High-Tech Marketing Disasters "
" SaaS Entrepreneur: The Definitive Guide to Succeeding Your Application Business on the cloud "

Hmmm ... I have to think about this. Let's analyze the signifiers of cool.

  • He doesn't give a damn. I'd say Musk has you covered.
  • Black turtleneck. Safe jobs.
  • Flat person without affections. Works.
  • Smoke pot in the chamber. Musk.
  • Launch real rocket ships into space. Musk.
  • Serious pop culture references on products. Musk.
  • Dates of pop stars and actresses. Musk.
  • Drive hot cars. Musk.
  • Good on TV as a cool medium according to McLuhan. Works.
  • Very low body temperature. Jobs has you covered, but Musk will die soon. And if he dies on Mars, this one will win too.

So, Musk.

Steve Jobs understood how humans react. He literally believed that people are heritably stupid. This is reflected in the same quotes he said:

"We don't do market research. People don't know what they want until we tell them."

"We are
not driven by people's expectations. We design products that drive people's expectations."

Steve Jobs knew how the market works, he knew that if one smart person has something and is able to describe how useful it is to him, another 100 will want it even if it doesn't serve their purpose. He was the best salesman of all time.

His methodology can be seen very clearly in India.

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Steve Jobs understood how humans react. He literally believed that people are heritably stupid. This is reflected in the same quotes he said:

"We don't do market research. People don't know what they want until we tell them."

"We are
not driven by people's expectations. We design products that drive people's expectations."

Steve Jobs knew how the market works, he knew that if one smart person has something and is able to describe how useful it is to him, another 100 will want it even if it doesn't serve their purpose. He was the best salesman of all time.

His methodology can be seen very clearly in Indian Ashrams where lacs of innocent people are fooled for lifetime with promise of getting something which others won't (Coincidentally Jobs spent his fair share of time in Indian Ashrams too):

1. Tell people that what you're offering is something very special.
Even if it is normal, market it as 'reinvented'. Describe it with superfluous adjectives.

2. People care about looks.
Give attention to fine details of appearance. Doesn't matter if it works or not (death grip incident, no file manager, no BT, no mem card slot... Even after paying a leg and an arm) but make it appealing. People will publicise it mouth to mouth if it looks good regardless of how functional it really is.
Basic psychology that guys want that most attractive girl of the college. Girls want that handsome badass. No one cares for the heart at first glance.
People want to show off. That's your sweet spot. Exploit it.

3. People want to feel special. Everyone wants to feel that they are superior be it Hitler or common joe.
So, make them feel special. Name products different ("Think different" ideology at work). iMac, iPhone... Make simple things look special (just like hallucinations. Jobs used LSD in early years so he knew what people want to see in normal things.)

4. Tell people that other are jealous of them because they can't have it.
Even if the other person is right, shut him up by labelling him jealous. Call him poor. Call him weak. This will differentiate you from them. You'll feel superior and will also save you from the debate which you'd have lost hadn't you used this tactic.
(Remember Jobs' reply when asked about phablets ? This was it: "They are stupid. Who'd ever want them ? They are like Hummer of mobile phones." Insult it if you can't win over it.)

This is the most important step. In ashrams people are taught that if someone questions your faith then tell them they can't feel what they have because they don't have it.
Even when they haven't felt anything. Even if they regret their decisions people will say it. Why ? Because this makes them superior to other. They have something which others don't.

5. Make it unaffordable. Make it hard to get.
This is the truth of life. Harder the aim, more the pleasure upon achieving it.
This strategy of overpricing products works for them. People buy it, dopamine is released and they feel special. They want it not because the product is helpful in their work but because it differentiates them from all those who can't afford it even when all the others have a better functional phone for half the price.

The recently launched adapter for MacBook (2015 edition) costs same as MotoG mobile phone on Verizon. Imagine how rich a person would feel showing off an adapter which costs more than the very mobile phone the other person is holding. Imagine him feeling special when people envy him. That's the trick mate.

6. Make the brand name impenetrable to any accusation. Make the name so strong that it itself becomes a reason to add to the product's value.
Need a similar example ? Ever heard of this: "...because I'm Batman." Yeah! Right. Say that in Christian Bale's voice.

Apple is the Batman of tech world. It won't fail anything. Dell XPS 13 (2015 edition) is available for 800 USD and has better resolution than the new MacBook which sits at around 1300 USD. It has more ports. Is exactly the same dimensions. Has no bezels around screen (very very thin). Looks jaw droping sexy but apparently only Apple has 'reinvented' the notebook this year.
Why ? "Because it's Apple!" Again! Christian Bale's voice
Don't tell me you haven't ever heard this argument: "An iPhone is an iPhone dear. You won't understand."

Others have given many great answers too. Apple locks its users with its services, short and strong portfolio, etc. All hold true. I've answered from the perspective of human psychology highlighting a different hidden aspect of Apple which goes unnoticed many times but has always played a great role in its success.
This is not to say Apple doesn't make good products. They do. I agree, but not worth the price it asks nor the infallible aura they're crowned with by people.

I hate the game they play with us. I hate how they use people as sheep who follow any hot trend and I hate how people, even after knowing everything let Ashrams and Apple play with them.


Edit 1: It seems few people have taken this as a criticism of Apple products. 6 points and all the focus on how Dell XPS 13 is better than MacBook. For them:

http://m.windowscentral.com/quic...

The focus of the answer isn't Apple and its products. It's about role of public and its perception of a company like Apple in its success and how Apple (mainly Jobs) has always "created a desire" for its products amongst people.
Also, the word 'ashrams' refers to all those sects of religions who fool innocents. It isn't meant to generalize all ashrams. Although the examples given here have been personally witnessed by me in a very famous Ashram with a very 'clean image'.

Tim Cook has done an excellent job continuing Apple's business led by Steve Jobs, but he hasn't done the hardest job of innovating like Steve Jobs did. Jobs had the visionary ability to see a problem like existing MP3 players and existing smartphones and come up with something better, which was often simpler and more intuitive. I don't see Tim Cook and his team having this almost magical ability. They have gotten rid of Jony Ive, who seemed inclined to thin objects, where professionals want more practical features and better battery life, which may happen in the future. Maybe we can get some information

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Tim Cook has done an excellent job continuing the business of Apple as led by Steve Jobs, but he has not done the harder job of innovating like Steve Jobs did. Jobs had the visionary ability to see a problem like existing MP3 players and existing smart phones and come up with something better, which often was simpler and intuitive. I don’t see Tim Cook and his team having this almost magical ability. They have gotten rid of Jony Ive, who seemed bent on slender objects, where pros want more practical functions and better battery life, which may happen in the future. Maybe we can get some input from the engineer god of Steve Wozniak who never really did much for the Mac, but had a good ethos and feel for expandability. This was contrary to what the rest of Apple was looking for.

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