Why is programming so in demand but so hard to get a programming job?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by William Stone



Why is programming so in demand but so hard to get a programming job?

First of all, "programming" is NOT in demand. Developers and engineers are in demand, that is, people who really know how to make software do things. (Just like there isn't much of a market for violinists who can't do anything but play scales. They must be able to read and play music). There are MANY people who think they can program, but have no application domain knowledge, or hands-on experience.

Second, a large number of job openings does not necessarily mean that there is a high demand, just that people are trying to identify talent. Partly to separate the persons who are competent from the great mass of t

Keep reading

First of all, "programming" is NOT in demand. Developers and engineers are in demand, that is, people who really know how to make software do things. (Just like there isn't much of a market for violinists who can't do anything but play scales. They must be able to read and play music). There are MANY people who think they can program, but have no application domain knowledge, or hands-on experience.

Second, a large number of job openings does not necessarily mean that there is a high demand, just that people are trying to identify talent. Partly to separate the competent people from the great mass of the dirty ones.

And then what is really in demand are good developers who will work cheaply, and claiming unavailability is a way to increase the number of H1B visas and justify more outsourcing to places where labor is cheaper.

Finally, much of the demand involves the maintenance of older systems, where people who know what they are doing are retiring and dying, and young people just don't find COBOL sexy enough to learn (if you can find someone who still teach it). This probably also applies to PL / 1.

Hi there!

As others have pointed out, it is not programming that is in demand: in fact, programming is decreasing, not increasing, in demand.

What is in demand now more than ever, and will continue to grow!, Is the need for software developers / engineers.

Then…. Why is so difficult? Because the work has decidedly steep boundaries, like cliffs that keep vibrating, expanding and contracting, and sometimes all at the same time, but on different sides. Because of this, the real skill is being able to understand these movements and harness what we can to make it all work.

And that, my friend, is an incredible

Keep reading

Hi there!

As others have pointed out, it is not programming that is in demand: in fact, programming is decreasing, not increasing, in demand.

What is in demand now more than ever, and will continue to grow!, Is the need for software developers / engineers.

Then…. Why is so difficult? Because the work has decidedly steep boundaries, like cliffs that keep vibrating, expanding and contracting, and sometimes all at the same time, but on different sides. Because of this, the real skill is being able to understand these movements and harness what we can to make it all work.

And that, my friend, is an incredibly difficult skill to learn and master. It is at the height of surgeons, physicists and other very, very, very high-level professions with equally complex nuances and you have to be able to look at both the trees and the forest at the same time to be successful.

It is so hideously complex that only very, very, very few people can reach a level that is superb enough to have a successful career as a software developer / engineer.

And I'm not talking about FAANG, I'm talking about your friendly neighborhood software developer here, the one who works on the road from his own office.

Great complexity demands high wages, and high wages attract many more people than are partially qualified. This is why FizzBuzz tests are one thing - some people lie on their resumes and apply for jobs they are not qualified for at all just because of the attractive salaries.

There is a term, "software is eating the world". Basically, labor is expensive and software enables a company to automate many of its operations while reducing costs. However, every company has unique requirements, as standard software is often not enough, hence the growing need for people who can build these systems.

Being able to write code to manage a to-do list is very different from designing an enterprise-level system. There are very few capable engineers who can take up the challenge and lead the team. These are the engineers who earn a very decent amount of m

Keep reading

There is a term, "software is eating the world". Basically, labor is expensive and software enables a company to automate many of its operations while reducing costs. However, every company has unique requirements, as standard software is often not enough, hence the growing need for people who can build these systems.

Being able to write code to manage a to-do list is very different from designing an enterprise-level system. There are very few capable engineers who can take up the challenge and lead the team. These are engineers who make a very decent amount of money. The problem with the "everyone can code" movement is that it leads people to incorrectly believe that they can learn this and make a fantastic income. The reality is that most cannot.

Without a proven track record, you won't get very far. However, if you take the initiative to build a portfolio that can demonstrate your ability, you can land an entry-level position with a horrible salary, take it. Work for free if necessary. Once you spend some time in the trenches, you learn and grow. Either you will become another mediocre engineer or if you really have the aptitude and dedication to the trade, you will become the rock star that everyone wants.

I can quit my job today and go into a new job in a couple of weeks, because I keep investing in myself, perfecting my craft, contributing to the community, and getting things done.

  1. Software development is project work that has a tight time limit, deadlines, and budgets.
  2. Since it must be delivered on a date that has been communicated to stakeholders, companies will sometimes have to go beyond their budget to hire a niche skill from the market.
  3. After the project is finished, they don't necessarily need that particular highly paid employee. There are many other young people who either acquired the skill or it is cheaper to hire them on the market to keep up the maintenance work.
  4. Some companies have a mandatory percentage of labor that must be cut each year. Allows them
Keep reading
  1. Software development is project work that has a tight time limit, deadlines, and budgets.
  2. Since it must be delivered on a date that has been communicated to stakeholders, companies will sometimes have to go beyond their budget to hire a niche skill from the market.
  3. After the project is finished, they don't necessarily need that particular highly paid employee. There are many other young people who either acquired the skill or it is cheaper to hire them on the market to keep up the maintenance work.
  4. Some companies have a mandatory percentage of labor that must be cut each year. It enables them to rebalance their budgets, priorities, and workforce alignments to meet their next set of deliverables.
  5. Mandatory trimming occurs through the Performance Improvement or Reorganization Plan or Burnout or informal gas lighting. Every culture is different.
  6. All of these dynamics have taught skilled workers that they are totally replaceable. This forced them to cite insane compensation expectations, as they know it's a year or two before the company plays its cards.
  7. Looking at the high compensation figures in the media, every programmer assumes that there is a lot of demand for their profile and that is eternal. They don't understand the niche. They don't understand the temporary nature of these high-paying jobs.
  8. Now, I'm not saying it's good, bad, or ugly. I'm just exposing the dynamics of the software industry so that applicants for these high-paying jobs can plan their lives accordingly, if they ever have one (work or life, it's up to the reader's imagination).

I think programming is in high demand, but not as high as job openings may indicate, and there are a few reasons why. Companies will post a job, perhaps on a few different sites. The job bots will then repost the job on more sites. So many companies no longer delete a post after the job is filled because it takes a long time to find qualified people and even if they do, it will take time for the new robot posters to expire the job post. All this added together gives the impression that there are ten times more vacant positions than there are.

But there is another problem. Companies, particularly th

Keep reading

I think programming is in high demand, but not as high as job openings may indicate, and there are a few reasons why. Companies will post a job, perhaps on a few different sites. The job bots will then repost the job on more sites. So many companies no longer delete a post after the job is filled because it takes a long time to find qualified people and even if they do, it will take time for the new robot posters to expire the job post. All this added together gives the impression that there are ten times more vacant positions than there are.

But there is another problem. Companies, particularly those that hire through human resources or headhunting departments, hire through a long list of skills. Rarely are the tools and skill requirements the same for two different companies. Typically, a qualified candidate can match 50% of the advertised skills and have no experience with the other half. This causes HR departments or managers to reject the candidate until a match occurs or, more likely, they are desperate for help. For each critical skill, the time taken to find a candidate increases exponentially. Therefore, jobs often stay on cable for a year or more when top candidates are available.

Scheduling is not an office job where people work in a fixed set of job functions with a fixed set of skills. Programming is a very broad, emerging and fastest changing field where the people who work here have to continually update their skills, knowledge, etc.

Each company requires different skills at different levels, your 20 years of experience in a certain field may become useless in another job, company, etc.

Companies are generally looking for young, talented, inexpensive and flexible resources who are experts in all trades. The more experience you have in this industry, the more vulnerable you are to job loss.

There is a great

Keep reading

Scheduling is not an office job where people work in a fixed set of job functions with a fixed set of skills. Programming is a very broad, emerging and fastest changing field where the people who work here have to continually update their skills, knowledge, etc.

Each company requires different skills at different levels, your 20 years of experience in a certain field may become useless in another job, company, etc.

Companies are generally looking for young, talented, inexpensive and flexible resources who are experts in all trades. The more experience you have in this industry, the more vulnerable you are to job loss.

There is a huge gap between the IT industry and educational institutions in terms of what the industry needs versus what has been taught. So deciphering programming interviews is very difficult.

Many jobs are filled with referrals within the organization, so networking with people is very important to landing a job.

So in general, what you see outside is not exactly the same as what is there.

Although there is a high demand for experienced programmers in the field, lucrative programming jobs are hard to come by. Generally, this is the reason why so many programmers are left unemployed. The main problem is that many programmers lack the social and technical skills necessary to be an effective employee. India is a hub for software and IT companies, so there are many opportunities available in India for programmers.

Personally, I would recommend expanding your domain of knowledge regarding various programming languages. You can learn new languages ​​on various platforms like Coursera, U

Keep reading

Although there is a high demand for experienced programmers in the field, lucrative programming jobs are hard to come by. Generally, this is the reason why so many programmers are left unemployed. The main problem is that many programmers lack the social and technical skills necessary to be an effective employee. India is a hub for software and IT companies, so there are many opportunities available in India for programmers.

Personally, I would recommend expanding your domain of knowledge regarding various programming languages. You can learn new languages ​​on various platforms like Coursera, Udemy, Simplilearn, and others. Apart from this, programmers should focus on developing various soft skills such as:

  • Leadership and delegation
  • Sociability and openness
  • Organizational skills
  • Team work and collaboration
  • Time management skills
  • Empathy
  • Active listening
  • Proactivity
  • Planning and coordination skills
  • Take personal responsibility

It is in high demand, because it is difficult to learn and good with it, that is why it is difficult to get a job.

Many new developers think that writing Udemy applications or other courses is sufficient, but this is incorrect. There is a syndrome of well-being with that basic experience after some course / tutorial and "there is no way to know everything", when you ask them why they do not know such basic things, but they promote themselves as developers. In fact, they don't even know what they don't know.

On the other hand, many companies are looking for developers with specific technology stacks, exactly these libraries / programs / tools,

Keep reading

It is in high demand, because it is difficult to learn and good with it, that is why it is difficult to get a job.

Many new developers think that writing Udemy applications or other courses is sufficient, but this is incorrect. There is a syndrome of well-being with that basic experience after some course / tutorial and "there is no way to know everything", when you ask them why they do not know such basic things, but they promote themselves as developers. In fact, they don't even know what they don't know.

On the other hand, many companies are looking for developers with specific technology stacks, exactly these libraries / programs / tools, but they don't just find a good developer and train them.

Because companies want to hire experienced experts who already know how to do everything for the price of unskilled fast food workers. That actually happens, companies put out job listings for developers, and at a 40-hour-per-week full-time job, it equates to a lower salary than fast food places that are now starting to pay $ 15 a week.

They also refuse to train employees when they have the capacity to do so. Then there are those who lack the ability to teach developers something about work.

The programming is not in great demand.

What are in high demand are experienced programmers who are willing to work long hours for fun money. If you are one of them, you will not find work due to the hiring policies of the companies (such as "we hire the best", and the best is defined by doing some programming test with errors).

All other combinations (inexperienced programmers who can accept a low salary and experienced programmers who want a reasonable salary) have no demand.

Yes, you are right, programming is in high demand, but at the same time there is also a lot of competition in the industry. As the technology landscape changes every day, it is very difficult to change early to adopt another (which may or may not hold).

Everyone expects to know everything, which is difficult, you can master one and the basics of others.

Happy learning.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.