Why is it so difficult to find a job in IT today? What are the skills I need to get a job if I don't have any connections or experience either?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Jax Hull



Why is it so difficult to find a job in IT today? What are the skills I need to get a job if I don't have any connections or experience either?

Here are three angles to apply simultaneously.

Align your expectations ...

I often see recent students or graduates waiting for the great, romantic tech roles they hear from without trying hard and building the knowledge base to get there. I'm not sure if that's the case for you, but I recognize that a career will get you where you want to go, but you may not start there.

Start somewhere ...

Start doing anything anywhere and you will build the foundation for your career path. For example, if you have some customer service experience and a degree in IT, then you may be a great candidate to star in.

Keep reading

Here are three angles to apply simultaneously.

Align your expectations ...

I often see recent students or graduates waiting for the great, romantic tech roles they hear from without trying hard and building the knowledge base to get there. I'm not sure if that's the case for you, but I recognize that a career will get you where you want to go, but you may not start there.

Start somewhere ...

Start doing anything anywhere and you will build the foundation for your career path. For example, if you have some customer service experience and a degree in IT, then you may be a great candidate to start in a basic technical support position. Or maybe you can even find a functional customer support role within a technology-related company or field.

If those paths don't work, then you still need a base somewhere. Consider even starting out in basic customer service (retail, call center, etc.) or entering a small business where you can informally apply your technical skills even within a non-technical role.

Self-study and stretching ...

Much of IT can be self-taught - never stop learning, teaching yourself, and applying technology as a hobby. And include everything you are doing on your resume. This way, even if you are working in a totally non-technical customer service role, you now have the 2 pieces that any technical support team would look for: customer service and technical enthusiasm and skills. Some things you can do include:

  • Build a computer
  • Get entry-level technology certifications (CompTIA, free certificates offered by some large companies and vendors, etc.)
  • Take coding courses online
  • Attend conferences or technology conferences
  • Join tech-related networking or professional groups

Applying these three angles simultaneously is the best bet for starting a career in IT. From there, continuing to self-study and "stretch" your assignments, projects, and hobbies is the way to develop and display the skill set that will lead you to new and more challenging IT roles, which could lead your career path in the direction you choose. .

It is not difficult if you are willing to start small. Look for positions in the call center / help desk. Many do not even require a college degree. You will likely be required to get certified, but your employer will likely pay for it and you might even get a bonus.

It is not that difficult unless you have good skills and speak good English. Skills means you have to face interviews and be successful.

Oh man, what a great question. What a GREAT question!

I am a professional "contractor". I have dedicated more than twenty years of my life to hiring, interviewing and making hiring decisions for and with companies.

And myself, I am currently looking for work, so I think I have some context to answer this question!

For starters, it is not that HARD to get a job. Compared to working as a farmer, or in a foundry (I guess!), Or ship breaking, applications and interviews are pretty easy things to do. Sure, it takes time, but the physical effort isn't really that significant.

Then why

Keep reading

Oh man, what a great question. What a GREAT question!

I am a professional "contractor". I have dedicated more than twenty years of my life to hiring, interviewing and making hiring decisions for and with companies.

And myself, I am currently looking for work, so I think I have some context to answer this question!

For starters, it is not that HARD to get a job. Compared to working as a farmer, or in a foundry (I guess!), Or ship breaking, applications and interviews are pretty easy things to do. Sure, it takes time, but the physical effort isn't really that significant.

So why doesn't everyone get the first job they apply for? (Perhaps these are clearer questions that get to the heart of what you are asking?)

One reason is that the hiring is broken. It is largely a guessing game. The resume is an imperfect tool for demonstrating the critical skills and experience that many jobs require; the interview doesn't measure those actual skills, it just asks you to talk about them; And hiring managers are not hiring experts, they are usually experts in their field of choice.

Managers don't think critically about what they really need from an employee (they really need), and HR departments don't do a good job of helping them define (and make known) those skills and needs. That means that you, as an applicant, read a list of job titles and requirements, and you have to guess if you are fit or not. (So ​​you hedge your bets and apply for a bunch of jobs that you are not fit for, or just WANT to be fit for.)

Develop a resume that consists of a set of words that you have carefully selected and placed in a way that you think will be interesting to the person reading it, and it may or may not be. And you never really find out how it worked (unless you get an interview).

Interviewers ask a lot of questions that don't make sense or don't help them assess whether you would be a good employee or not. They ask stupid questions for which you have a predefined answer, or they ask questions that they should in no way trust your answer. Interviewers have “favorite” questions that they believe are divine “true” answers, but are actually trick questions that the interviewer interprets through their own biases and experience.

Interviews rarely give a candidate the opportunity to really demonstrate their expertise or ease in the skills they will use on the job. The interview is an artificial environment, and it is a scenario that hardly anyone will ever create again when doing their job. Candidates won't talk about what they do, they will. Interviews hire good storytellers.

There is also a strange imbalance of power in hiring. Companies seem to want to keep actual qualifications for the job secret. (This may be because they are very poorly defined and threats of legal action for some of the real reasons. Often times, critical skills for office jobs are work ethic, passion, drive, tact, self-motivation, independence, smart politics, etc., how do you interview someone for those things?) Most of the people you interview are rejected for rather minor reasons. "Cultural adjustment" is a big problem (what does that really mean?). Sometimes a question is answered in a bit of a roundabout way, but the hiring team places enormous importance on anything strange and they tend to exaggerate things. Full candidates are rejected on the mere suspicion of a hiring manager about a given answer! A suspicion!

Candidates often don't have enough information (or power) to ask meaningful questions in return. They have the company's website, Glassdoor, and maybe a friend or two to ask about what the job really entails, or what it's really like to work there, and then if they get an offer, they just accept it.

Interestingly, hiring managers almost always tell us that they don't want to accept the first candidate they interview. Even when that person is a perfect fit! They want to compare them to someone else! Now that's probably pretty understandable, in a way, but I guess hiring would be "easier" for about 15% of openings if the hiring manager hired that perfect first candidate without knowing anyone else. fifteen%!

Finally, some jobs are really complex. They really require what we call a "purple squirrel". It can be two jobs mixed into one and may require a strange combination of strange skills. Every company is different at any point in its history, and matching your current situation with the people who do your work can be tricky. The team you will join is also filled with unique people with their own abilities, flaws, political leanings, and finding the right mix to complement / fight / improve those people is somewhat tricky.

Entire books have been written on these challenges, but few accept the solutions that are offered. Solutions can be time consuming, expensive, and even add significant complexity to a process that you already consider "difficult." Maybe one day you'll be a hiring manager or in charge of hiring, and you can join me in trying to make things better!

That completely depends on your point of view on the matter:

  • It's very easy: the "Google" on your resume opens many doors
  • It is very difficult - it is unlikely that you will get the same base salary that you had at Google

If you are addicted to the paycheck, it is unlikely that you will get paid what Google was paying you.

While some companies will give you most of the benefits you had while on Google, you won't get all of them. There are very few "companies at parity"; Facebook is one of them, but for example: Apple is definitely not one of them.

It can also be difficult to convince some employers to consider you serious.

Keep reading

That completely depends on your point of view on the matter:

  • It's very easy: the "Google" on your resume opens many doors
  • It is very difficult - it is unlikely that you will get the same base salary that you had at Google

If you are addicted to the paycheck, it is unlikely that you will get paid what Google was paying you.

While some companies will give you most of the benefits you had while on Google, you won't get all of them. There are very few "companies at parity"; Facebook is one of them, but for example: Apple is definitely not one of them.

It can also be difficult to convince some employers to consider you a serious candidate; there are two reasons for this:

  1. If you're so good, why are you an unemployed ex-Googler looking for work, rather than someone who had a job booked before leaving Google?
  2. We will never be able to meet your salary demands, so let's focus on candidates that we have the opportunity to be able to afford to hire for the value we will get from having them.

The main exception to this are startups. Startups always think that your final valuation will be so fantastically high that they can easily believe that you would drop a high salary on Google to get a much lower salary plus equity instead. They believe that "Obviously, in the long run, when we get out, they will make so much money that it would be silly to stay on Google!"

First of all, you have to be kind of delusional, go to a startup to raise capital or found your own startup, and that tends to influence the way people perceive the value of the “opportunity” that they offer to others. Sometimes it pays off.

By the way, in the valley, going from one startup to another, hoping to get a reward in equity, is informally known as "Startup Roulette" - the odds are roughly the same, and it's usually a game for people. younger.

My approach is different. Let's look at the question again.

  1. You want to find a job in IT. Fast, that is, sooner rather than later. AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. By EOB at the latest. (As embarrassing as these expressions are, you must know them if you want to work in IT.)
  2. To achieve this goal, you are willing to learn an IT skill. But it must be a skill in demand. And it should be possible to learn it quickly. Very smart. It's good to maximize ROI to achieve optimal business value. (Again, I am connecting the jargon).


Other requirements are not stated (possibly intentionally).

  1. No long-term perspective for skills in q
Keep reading

My approach is different. Let's look at the question again.

  1. You want to find a job in IT. Fast, that is, sooner rather than later. AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. By EOB at the latest. (As embarrassing as these expressions are, you must know them if you want to work in IT.)
  2. To achieve this goal, you are willing to learn an IT skill. But it must be a skill in demand. And it should be possible to learn it quickly. Very smart. It's good to maximize ROI to achieve optimal business value. (Again, I am connecting the jargon).


Other requirements are not stated (possibly intentionally).

  1. No long-term perspective for the skills in question. A modern programming language today may disappear tomorrow. (I do know a few select people who still make a lot of money from COBOL, though.)
  2. No desire to keep the job in question. Perhaps your goal is to get an internship quickly to fill a gap in your CV and, once done, expand from there.
  3. No other skills. So we are really focusing on a basic IT skill. The one you can't do without. (Social skills are another matter entirely.)
  4. Personal growth and job satisfaction are not mentioned. This alone is a huge topic in itself. (But rest assured, Quora can help.)


So here is my advice: learn Microsoft Office.

Why? Because you can use it, and you probably will have to use it, almost everywhere. It is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for almost any job.

Note that I have used the Office 2013 logo above, but the reality of the situation is that, given your circumstances, you are more likely to find a job in a large corporation. And there, you will face Office 2003. In Windows XP. That legendary upgrade project to (are you sitting?) Office 2007 on Windows 7 has been underway for years and isn't likely to come to fruition anywhere near its lifetime.

The fact is, even today, you can impress your older colleagues by learning a few more functions than the standard user knows about. Test? Do people know how to use Microsoft Office? (To save you suspense: no, they don't.)

To get you started, here are some tips. @ other readers: feel free to add more, but let's do that in separate questions. (I'll list a few below).

Microsoft Word

  • Use formats: bold, italic, underline, font sizes, colors. Without formats, you could also use Notepad. However, don't overdo it. Instead, learn about styles, which are really just a form of formatting macros. (I just invented.)
  • For the more daring: get acquainted with Mail Merge for serial letters. This will also give you knowledge of field codes. And those are necessary to really understand tables of contents.
  • Further reading: What are some of the infrequently used features of Microsoft Word?


Microsoft Excel

  • First and foremost: use formulas. As for Word, without formulas, you could also use Notepad. Second, use graphics. Your data alone will not speak for itself. A graph will do it.
  • And then you can move on to more sophisticated things like AutoFilter, Conditional Formatting, and PivotTables. Understanding pivot tables will force you to understand data structures, a must for any advanced IT job.
  • More information: What are the best time-saving tips with Excel? What are some of the lesser known but useful Excel functions / tricks? What are some cool Microsoft Excel tricks?


Microsoft PowerPoint

  • You will need to understand the concept of slide layouts (the possible arrangement of text / image / table boxes on your slide) and slide master (the template that slide layouts are based on). For graphic objects, learn how to align them; it just looks better. Plus, learn about Groups to make it easier to manipulate multiple objects.
  • However, the main obstacle to PowerPoint is not actually how to use it, but how to make a compelling presentation. A presentation is much more than a set of slides. Think about the goal you want to achieve and craft your presentation accordingly.
  • More information: What are some of the lesser known / used features of Microsoft PowerPoint? How can I polish my PowerPoint to make my presentation more attractive?


Microsoft Outlook
You weren't expecting this one, did you? But if your company uses Word et al., It probably uses Outlook as well. (If you're lucky, sure. Otherwise, you're stuck in hell with Lotus Notes.) By the way, learn the difference between Exchange (server) and Outlook (client).

  • The most important thing to know in Outlook (or any email client) are the differences between To and CC on the sending side, and between Reply and Reply all on the receiving side. Also, use the Subject line of a message as TL; DR.
  • Specifically for Outlook, flagging and categorizing messages will help you manage your workload and get things done between one email and the next. Also, learn about the corporate address book and the personal address book, as well as shared calendars.
  • More information: What are the most useful productivity-rich hacks for Outlook?


Microsoft Office in general

  • Some tips apply to several or all products in the Office suite, for example, you can work much more efficiently by learning some of the many keyboard shortcuts. Copying and pasting a part of your work can be greatly improved with Paste Special. Also learn how to use AutoFormat and AutoCorrect, and the difference between the two. Lastly, use the spell checker extensively; is there to help you, so you have no excuse for obvious typos.
  • Enable automatic backups every few minutes. And whenever possible, enable backups on save as well. It is a global setting in Word, a per-file setting in Excel, and it is not available in PowerPoint. Generally speaking, apart from the many similarities within the Office suite, note that there are many differences, for example, regarding hyphenation.
  • More information: What are the essential Microsoft Office techniques (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Visio)?


Is all for today. I await your comments. And if you want to know more, ask Quora and A2A questions with me, I will gladly help you. Until then, I wish you all the best for your job search.

TL; DR: If you don't have IT skills, but want to learn one to get a job, learn to use Microsoft Office, this will bring you the highest return on investment.

There are so many answers to this question that it is difficult to know where to start.

My advice, having spent 25 years in the industry and having interviewed thousands and hired hundreds of people, is to find your passion first. Do you want to be a developer, infrastructure person (i.e. support, servers, etc.), website designer, etc.? Think carefully, as many jobs are becoming commodities as IT moves to the cloud.

What I don't recommend is to go out and get a degree. Anyway, not at the beginning.

Every time we advertise a job, we get hundreds of applicants, most of them with degrees and most of them

Keep reading

There are so many answers to this question that it is difficult to know where to start.

My advice, having spent 25 years in the industry and having interviewed thousands and hired hundreds of people, is to find your passion first. Do you want to be a developer, infrastructure person (i.e. support, servers, etc.), website designer, etc.? Think carefully, as many jobs are becoming commodities as IT moves to the cloud.

What I don't recommend is to go out and get a degree. Anyway, not at the beginning.

Every time we advertise a job, we get hundreds of applicants, most of them with degrees and most of them with CVs that look and sound exactly the same (if I had a dollar for every person who has `` great communication skills ''! ). For one of those hundreds of indistinguishable applicants, then a degree is a minimum requirement, but it will hardly make you more employable.

Instead, consider volunteering your time for work experience. Find out who you want to work for and cold call them - prepare well and be brave enough to do it, and one of them will at least allow you to volunteer soon enough.

I once heard from a guy who called the same company every month for five months before they finally gave him a paid job just to shut him up.

Most volunteers (who are smart and still motivated, despite not being paid) are hired in 3 to 6 months. Even if it took you two years to get hired, you'd be better off than going to college (college degrees take three years and cost a fortune, it doesn't cost you anything to volunteer).

If I see a cover letter from someone who has (or is) volunteering their time for work experience, then that CV will be read and they will likely get an interview. For me, this is a bigger differentiator than a college degree.

Of course, you would learn things in college that you don't necessarily learn on the job, but this answer is about getting a job in IT, not improving yourself.

One last tip: be passionate about technology and incorporate it into your life. As a teenager I used to read software manuals (they used to be printed and bound like phone books) while on vacation at the beach. The best developer I hired was completely self-taught and spent many hours writing code in his room (we hired him at 17). Ironically, he's working for us part-time while completing his degree and will be doing his master's degree next year, so you've figured out how to get the best of both worlds.

If you have a passion for technology and spend your time honing your knowledge and skills, not only will it be easier for you to land a job, but you will also tend to love your job, even if you work for free.

First, remember that everyone starts out inexperienced, so you are not alone.

You did not mention in which fields you are interested in entering. Accounting can help, but it certifies that you have high-level skills in communication, analytical thinking, and creativity - skills that are highly valued in many work settings. Depending on the career and educational choices you make now, your degree can be the stepping stone to anything from law to journalism, technical writing, and teaching.

When you're just out of college and embarking on your career pursuit, it's easy to feel intimidated. Job

Keep reading

First, remember that everyone starts out inexperienced, so you are not alone.

You did not mention in which fields you are interested in entering. Accounting can help, but it certifies that you have high-level skills in communication, analytical thinking, and creativity - skills that are highly valued in many work settings. Depending on the career and educational choices you make now, your degree can be the stepping stone to anything from law to journalism, technical writing, and teaching.

When you're just out of college and embarking on your career pursuit, it's easy to feel intimidated. Job hunting without a lot of work experience can be frustrating, but with a little hard work, a lot of ambition, and self-confidence, it can happen.

Here's how to get there:

1. EMBRACE YOUR REALITY

If you are applying for entry-level positions, most people do not expect you to enter with a resume full of experience. Instead, accept their inexperience and use it as motivation to learn. Highlight examples of your dedication, curiosity, and commitment to learning and growing. The people who are hiring are looking for people who are willing to work hard and who want to learn.

2. IDENTIFY YOUR SKILLS

Make a list of all the skills listed in the posts for the position you are seeking to obtain: computer skills, technical skills, communication skills, research skills, problem solving skills. What do people come to you for help with?

3. MAKE THE LINK

When you decide to apply for a certain position, you must have reason to believe that you can do the job well. Take some time to analyze that link. What formal or informal experience do you have, or what personal traits, that make the job suitable? Be analytical and creative in this process. Once you make the link yourself, you can explain it to a potential employer.

4. HIGHLIGHT THE "SOFT SKILLS"

What will make you stand out from the rest? Remember to show qualities like kindness, professionalism, responsiveness, and follow-through. Solid soft skills can go a long way, because they can't really be taught.

5. KNOW YOUR OWN VALUE

You may not have years of work experience, but what else in your background can prove your worth to an employer? The experience doesn't have to come solely from traditional jobs; Market any skills you have developed in other areas of your life.

6. BALANCING TRUST WITH THE BEGINNER'S MIND

Confidence is important, but it must be accompanied by humility and modesty, the hallmark of the "beginner's mind." Show that you can do the job, but also show that you are willing to learn.

7. BEGIN A VOLUNTEER

If you can't find a job, work for free. A volunteer position can be easier to find than an internship. Volunteer for the most relevant service you can. Not only will you gain valuable experience, but you will also be able to build a network and set foot in the door.

8. NETWORK

Building your personal network is a reliable path to great work at any stage in life. Connect with everyone you know, and in turn everyone they know, through social media, community and career events, setting up lunch or coffee appointments to stay in touch, in whatever way you can find.

9. KEEP LEARNING

You may need more education to qualify for what you really want to do; For example, if you discover an interest in law, then it may be time to apply to law school. But even outside of formal education, find ways to stay current and expand your knowledge base - take non-credit or auditing classes, enroll in professional development or special training courses, or just read a lot in your fields of interest.

10. BE REALISTIC

Even making the most of your skills and experience, be sure to apply for positions that are appropriate for you. In a tight job market where employers are flooded with highly qualified applicants, there is less incentive to take a chance on a marginally qualified candidate. Aim carefully at jobs where you can really show that you can be successful, not just those where you think, "I could do that," but those where you can excel with the strength and skills you already have.

The more defeated you allow yourself to feel, the more defeatist this experience will be. Every day, do something to find a job and do it with the mindset that it is not a useless endeavor but an adventure, an opportunity to learn and explore.

Along the way, remember to put yourself in the shoes of those who will hire you. What should make them excited for you? The answer to that question should be reflected in everything you do, from your job search responses to your cover letter, your resume, and your interview. Make a compelling case for yourself, take your life into your own hands, and make this work.

You will be amazed at what you can accomplish with the right mindset.

I wish you the best of luck!

The question is fraught with ambiguity, are you a computer science or other graduate looking for a position, considering your options, a teenager aspiring to a career in IT, or a middle-aged person who looking to work in an IT organization.

When they ask me how to get started in technology, if there is a job, there is a technology component, no exceptions. Look inward and discover what you love. If you love fashion, then you may be interested in electronic textiles; If you love playing video games, you might want to try hacking a Kinect. If you are nice

Keep reading

The question is fraught with ambiguity, are you a computer science or other graduate looking for a position, considering your options, a teenager aspiring to a career in IT, or a middle-aged person who looking to work in an IT organization.

When they ask me how to get started in technology, if there is a job, there is a technology component, no exceptions. Look inward and discover what you love. If you love fashion, then you may be interested in electronic textiles; If you love playing video games, you might want to try hacking a Kinect. If you are good with numbers, focus on financial services, if you are good at sales, you can always find a company that you are good at and start developing an IT extension. There are tons of options, explore the areas you are passionate about, and don't just think you need to work in a traditional software company or IT department. This way you will get closer to your goal.

You don't have to go the traditional Computer Science degree route if you don't want to, but definitely keep that option open. If you want to get a job as a programmer and you are self-taught, you will have to work harder and have good examples to show your skills. Build your portfolio by developing apps or team up with a few people in your local hacker space to contribute to a project. Find people who are looking for help, consider donating your time to nonprofits that have high-level members willing to teach you. Find organizations that have in-house mentoring programs and talk to them. Communicate with the people you admire and ask them to guide you.

Just remember, you are never too old to learn. Don't graze and definitely don't let anyone else. If you want to learn something new, do it.

The whole gamut and in all different industries, ranging from ad agencies to movie studios, tech startups, and traditional software companies, look for people with skills, stay in touch with recruiters, show off your accomplishments, and you'll be in touch soon. for a job.

“There is a 100% chance of failure if you don't even try. Just do it!!"

The IT sector is mainly divided into 2 domains, that is, product-based companies and service-based companies.

  • Product-based companies are those that create some products like Microsoft, PayTM, Amazon, etc. are product-based companies. Product-based businesses are driven by an idea to help different customers. Here the main focus would be what should I do to improve my product.
  • Service companies are those that work on these products to provide customer service. For example: TCS, Wipro, etc. they are service companies. Service-based businesses are driven by customer needs. They offer services
Keep reading

The IT sector is mainly divided into 2 domains, that is, product-based companies and service-based companies.

  • Product-based companies are those that create some products like Microsoft, PayTM, Amazon, etc. are product-based companies. Product-based businesses are driven by an idea to help different customers. Here the main focus would be what should I do to improve my product.
  • Service companies are those that work on these products to provide customer service. For example: TCS, Wipro, etc. they are service companies. Service-based businesses are driven by customer needs. They offer services and solutions according to customer requirements.

I suggest you go for a product-based company because,

  1. Package - ₹ 3L in service companies or ₹ 10L - ₹ 40L in product companies? Is this a joke?
  2. Work: Product companies pride themselves on their pure development work. What can service companies offer me? Maintenance work? Bored!
  3. Exposure: Service companies hire tens of thousands of candidates each year. And most of them can't even code well (no offense). It's not a thriving environment, is it? Product companies hire only the best and I prefer to work with the best.
  4. Career: Product companies offer shortcuts to my future. Working at a product company literally draws me to recruiters. What can service companies offer me? A 1-2 year service bond? No thanks!

Whether you must opt ​​for a product-based MNC or a product-based start-up, it is entirely in your interest. If you're exceptionally good at coding and have a zeal for creating something, then go for product-based MNC. But stick with one thing: having the opportunity to work in a large multinational product company is difficult, as you do not have the right experience for the same. It is better to go for a product-based startup or a small company and not a multinational because in a small company, in fact, you can learn and pursue your dreams after 2-3 years.

That said, the most important aspect of hiring has become skills and passion. Every employer expects its employees to be trained in the job or domain in which they are hiring.

The skills in product-based companies for a better career path in:

Web Development - This domain job roles such as Frontend Developer, Backend Developer, and MEAN Stack Developer are in high demand in terms of growth opportunity and salary offered to them.

  • Frontend developers: Javascript, JQuery and AngularJS
  • Back-end developer: Javascript, JSON, NodeJS, ExpressJS, Cloud
  • There is another job that is in high demand these days: MEAN Stack Developer, which requires the combination of skills mentioned in the case of Frontend Developer and Backend Developer.

Data Scientist: Data scientists are considered the "sexiest job of the 21st century." The skills required to become a data scientist are statistics, R programming, predictive modeling, machine learning algorithms, and text mining. His average salary in India is more than 6 LPA.

Since you don't have any IT industry experience, you should have some professional and technical skills in IT industry domains that can propel you to the right places to succeed. Therefore, it should be your main goal to acquire these professional skills so that you stand out in front of the others.

  • Gain skills in the job or career path of your choice from expert industry professionals through the combination of a live and online learning process.
  • Show your domain expertise by doing Live Project.
  • Finally appear for the interview and Get Hired in the IT sector.

There are several platforms from where you can acquire skills such as:

  • Edureka, Udemy, Simplilearn: These platforms provide different courses and certifications so that one can acquire skills in the mentioned domain. But these do not give you your end goal, that is, a job, as certificates do not guarantee the job.
  • edWisor.com is one of those platforms that not only trains you in the relevant technologies based on the career path of your choice. But also getting hired by product-based companies. There are over 100 companies that are hiring edWisor-trained candidates.

So you can choose from the above the one that best suits your needs.

All the best.

This is really complicated what you ask here.

Society pushes you to work, or lets you live with monetary restrictions, due to lack of money.

Before answering your question, I'd like to ask you to ask yourself how much money you have and see how long you want to live with what you already have, until it expires.

The next question is what lifestyle do you want to have. The more luxurious the lifestyle you want to have, the less chance you have of making it possible in real life, because after you hit 0, it doesn't matter if it's dollar, yen, euro or whatever ... you still have to pay more sooner or later,

Keep reading

This is really complicated what you ask here.

Society pushes you to work, or lets you live with monetary restrictions, due to lack of money.

Before answering your question, I'd like to ask you to ask yourself how much money you have and see how long you want to live with what you already have, until it expires.

The next question is what lifestyle do you want to have. The more luxurious the lifestyle you want to have, the less chance you have of making it possible in real life, because after you hit 0, it doesn't matter if it's dollar, yen, euro or whatever ... you still have to pay more sooner or later, you know.

And if you live beyond your means, where your bank account is below 0 without working, you are basically screwed and it would be better for you to live even with less than a Monk.

Short answer for you:

Do the job you hate least and part-time if you want, combined with a modest lifestyle, in which you only spend (relatively a lot of time and / or money) on one thing, such as clothes to attract a wealthy partner, practical knowledge (I don't think you're interested) or ...

Travel experience?

Travel experience is one of the best things you should give yourself, once you have at least a small job, because you:

  • lack a lot of common sense (based on your question)
  • Do not have enough life experience.

Well,

at least you have asked the question. Do not forget to first travel close to home, around 20 then slowly towards 100 then thousand miles… So you can adapt yourself.

Good luck!

Just to help you -

Bad solutions:

# testing your luck with the lottery

#Becoming a gangsta/ criminal - very dangerous

# going to prison - unless you do not care if you are free or not.

Ok so I am going to write this one anonymously. Because i am gonna tell u my salary.

I am not from a very good university, but from an average one. When I was looking for a job, my many friends were already earning and I was just looking for the job and those were the guys I used to teach during exams, so my dad once told me, "just get on the train, it doesn't matter. whether it is an AC coach or a third class coach, the only thing that matters is getting to your destination "

  1. I started my career in 2014 with a starting salary of 8k. Guess what after a month or so I got a call from a reputable company and got a
Keep reading

Ok, I will write this anonymously. Because I'll tell you my salary.

I am not from a very good university, but from an average one. When I was looking for a job, my many friends were already earning and I was just looking for the job and those were the guys I used to teach during exams, so my dad once told me, "just get on the train, it doesn't matter. whether it is an AC coach or a third class coach, the only thing that matters is getting to your destination "

  1. I started my career in 2014 with a starting salary of 8k. Guess what after a month or so I got a call from a reputable company and got a 4 lakhs salary package
  2. So in the same year after a month i started working in this new company so when I left this company in 2016 my in hand salary was 41k
  3. Now I am working in a start up from last 1 year my in hand salary is 75k and I have 3 years of work experience

I am telling you this just to inspire you I am not saying I am the best there are millions of people earning more than that.

My point is just start and please leave your ego if you have any learn anything and everything which comes in your way and most importantly believe in yourself.

I am just an ordinary guy like you.

I hope this would help to inspire you.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.