Why is it so difficult to apply for a job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Jasper Dudley



Why is it so difficult to apply for a job?

I'm in the middle of this right now. I am currently looking for a new one and applying for a job myself. I have my resume and cover letter posted on various job boards like ziprecruiter, etc., but the problem I have is that none of the jobs on these sites interest me even a little bit. It's all warehouse, shipping, and retail jobs that I certainly don't want to do. It sounds like pure wage slavery to me, with no room for growth, I have money saved and a comfortable situation ...

Continue with Quora + Unlock this answer and support creators like Gage Watson by joining Quora + Start your free trial

Why is it so difficult to apply for a job?

For most people it is the fear of the unknown. We are putting too much emphasis on what the job could mean or the inability to get a position in general can mean.

We are entering an unfamiliar environment with organizations, people, sometimes job responsibilities, benefits, and sacrifices.

Many times we are just human beings and we push ourselves too hard. In addition, we may not be sure who we are and this can generate great anxiety for not knowing in which professions we can do well.

If you prepare

Keep reading

Why is it so difficult to apply for a job?

For most people it is the fear of the unknown. We are putting too much emphasis on what the job could mean or the inability to get a position in general can mean.

We are entering an unfamiliar environment with organizations, people, sometimes job responsibilities, benefits, and sacrifices.

Many times we are just human beings and we push ourselves too hard. In addition, we may not be sure who we are and this can generate great anxiety for not knowing in which professions we can do well.

If you prepare for the interview by reading about the company, Googling the company online, preparing your resume, preparing your interview, you can help alleviate your fears.

Ask someone with job search experience, resume preparations and interviews to help you with these areas. Most of the people you meet will have suggestions and ideas. Ask a friend to do a mock interview for you. If possible, have a friend accompany you to the location of the workplace or stop by on your own.

Search the multiple job search sites online to get interview questions and answers and ask the employer. Google Job Search Sites, Questions, Answers, Resume Preparation.

Good luck.

Because companies make sure they don't make a hiring mistake. It takes time to find the right candidate.

I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain position.

Keep reading

I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain role. They are really smart. It's not just about your knowledge and skills, it's also about how well you perform in that position.

2 - Is the Google interview process very difficult?

Yes and No. It depends. It will depend on the interviewer, recruiter and how long the position has been open, how quickly they need someone for the position, and the skills of other candidates. Some interviewers want to hire a copy of themselves and in this case, no matter how good you are, if you don't share the same style and personality as the hiring manager, you won't get the job.

3 - Most of the time they have someone in mind for the role.

I can explain that in more detail later, but at Google they need to interview multiple people for a position. Sometimes they loved the first candidate and when you showed up for the interview they already fell in love with someone else. However, they are still obliged to interview the other candidates and sometimes they will do it very badly because they see it as a waste of time. In cases like that, you will probably walk out of the interview feeling like you won't get the job.

4 - Are you always looking to hire the best candidate?

Not always. There are a lot of insider recommendations for roles, and unless the person someone referred you is really bad and you're incredibly good at what you do, chances are you won't get the role.

Google is the company where I saw the highest number of Googlers friends, husbands, wives, boyfriends, girlfriends, brothers and sisters hired. In my team, at least 25% of the people have a family member or someone very close who works at Google.

5 - Heart rate can be very lazy

You have to think in terms of supply and demand to understand the recruitment process at Google. They have hundreds, sometimes thousands of people applying for a position on Google. They don't need to scout for talent (although most of the time they do), they already have millions of people wanting to work for them.

For that reason, recruiters are sometimes really disorganized and don't care much about you and can't send you enough information that you will need to perform well in the interview.

But that is not the rule. I believe that most of the time they do a decent job and in their defense they receive thousands of applications a month, 95% of the time from people who are not suitable for the position.

6 - You need to be lucky

I have a friend at Google who said that his technical interview questions were very similar to the questions he had been practicing in a book on technical interview questions. He was fortunate to be prepared to answer all the questions correctly and faster. I know another guy who is really normal, but who worked with a Googler at an agency and when a position became available they recommended him for the position.

You have to keep in mind that the hiring process in Google is not perfect. I think there is a lot of decision-making power in the hiring manager's hand.

7 - There are many average people

One thing you hear a lot during your first few months at Google is about imposter syndrome. Google has amazing people working for them and some of the brightest people I had the pleasure of working with I met at Google. However, there are also many average people. What you don't see is anyone below average. Everyone has at least enough skills to do a reasonable job. I think Google is good at providing a fertile environment for personal growth. It also challenges you to keep improving, but still, there are some folks who are happy enough to be on Google and not worried about improvement.

8 - Non-technical roles

Non-technical roles are the most difficult because it is difficult to establish the correct success metrics for a candidate. Technical roles are easier because 70% of the process is to show that you have great skills and your methods to solve a problem.

When it comes to non-technical roles it is very easy to get a false positive. It's not hard to cheat the process if you're really good at interviewing or the hiring manager isn't very skilled either. I worked for a large, well-known company where the team leader was not really trained and unprepared for his role, but his manager (the department director) was also untrained and unprepared. So if you're applying for a position where hiring managers are bad at what they do, chances are they will hire someone just as bad as they are. In my case, I was hired because someone else with great influence in the company decided that I was the right candidate.

9 - Googleness

You hear a lot about Googleness, but I think that as long as you don't do something really awkward or unprofessional during the interview, Googleness isn't that important. Googleness is a "metric" that shows how apt you are to work in the Google environment.

A GUIDE TO

WORK ABROAD

Whether you've accidentally spent your last dollar or are fed up with your current boss and need a breath of fresh, foreign air, job abroad programs are a great way to earn more than just money. The list of

STEP 1: CHOOSE A LOCATION

The world is a big place, and everything the light touches is in your kingdom for possible jobs abroad. Oh! That's even more overwhelming than chasing away a herd of slimy hyenas. How do you start zooming in on the global map until you find a place that you would like to temporarily call home? Get started by completing this little questionnaire

Keep reading

A GUIDE TO

WORK ABROAD

Whether you've accidentally spent your last dollar or are fed up with your current boss and need a breath of fresh, foreign air, job abroad programs are a great way to earn more than just money. The list of

STEP 1: CHOOSE A LOCATION

The world is a big place, and everything the light touches is in your kingdom for possible jobs abroad. Oh! That's even more overwhelming than chasing away a herd of slimy hyenas. How do you start zooming in on the global map until you find a place that you would like to temporarily call home? Start by completing this little questionnaire:

Familiar or exotic? England or Azerbaijan? And Japan? Some people are more comfortable staying in places that remind them of their current country: a similar culture, a connection with friends / family, and a taste of home. Others are drawn to the wild nature and mystique of exotic locations for opposite reasons. Neither right nor wrong, just keep in mind that you will be there for a while, so try to choose a place that works decently bureaucratically and provides you with a friendly work environment. Learning how to cover a sari can be quite difficult, even without dealing with tropical diseases.

Voulez-vous parlez anglais avec moi? If the idea of ​​picking up and moving to an entirely different universe seems overwhelming enough, you might at least be interested in having conversations in a language you understand. (This still leaves you with a lot of great options - Australia, Canada, UK, etc.). But, if you're ready to rock in more than one language, focus on one part of the world that speaks what you're learning (or would like to learn). German, Italian, Arabic, Swahili, Aymara, Archi? Take your pick, pack a multilingual dictionary, and see you later, baby!

Visa or no visa? Most countries will not require a visa for short-term jobs, but if you plan to work or stay for more than a few months, a visa becomes essential. While a small piece of political paper shouldn't greatly affect your decision (where there's a will, there's a way), it's not a bad idea to check which countries you can stay in, for how long, do what before setting your eyes. on the award.

STEP 2: SELECT A FIELD

As diverse as places in the world are the types of jobs you can take on abroad. Ultimately, you can do anything, so we recommend that you focus on something that really interests you or is beneficial for what you want to do later in life. Most of us still can't answer the question parents have been asking us since we were four years old (what do you want to do when you grow up, honey?), But that's okay. Getting a job abroad doesn't mean a lifetime commitment and you don't necessarily have to pave the way to your final career. In fact, the global sphere offers a great deal of experimental room for maneuver.

If you're not sure what jobs are available abroad or are just starting to dream about your career, here are some of the most common jobs abroad for foreign workers:

Teaching English. The most common and safest way to get a job abroad is to teach English. Many teaching abroad jobs require teachers to have a TEFL certification, but after the initial investment, you will have a lifetime certificate and unlimited opportunities.

Child care. Au pairing has been used as a way out of the familiarities of home and into someone else's lifestyle for centuries. Au pair placements are typically more short-term, but it's still a great way to fully immerse yourself in a new culture, language, and location. While teaching the ABCs to young children, you can also network in the surrounding community and potentially find additional future job opportunities.

Science and health. Anything you are interested in doing at home is probably also possible abroad, so why not give it a try? Does the mention of archeology, chemistry, or nursing inspire warm and fuzzy feelings? If you studied a particular field, look for relevant jobs abroad in the countries that interest you. Don't underestimate yourself; Even a high school degree is usually more education than most people in developing countries have, so sell your skills.

Hospitality. From helping reception desks to creating culinary masterpieces, the hospitality industry offers a flexible option for those in need of some quick cash. While common restaurant jobs (such as waitress, host, cleaning) are easy to find on the streets, there are also several work abroad programs that can provide secure seasonal or temporary job placement abroad. The bonuses of hospitality jobs abroad include working for a family business (or American) and living abroad at the same time.

STEP 3: UNDERSTAND WAGES AND COSTS

A good thing to keep in mind from Step 1: The biggest potential cost of your work abroad is the price of transportation to get there. Be sure to calculate transportation costs in your budget, especially if you are considering a shorter placement, and look at which employers will cover this expense.

Salaries vary wildly for jobs abroad, as well as for jobs at home, depending on the field, company, your experience, and your work location. Most jobs abroad will provide a salary; although, some work abroad programs simply offer food, lodging, and a token weekly salary in exchange for work.

Also, consider the global economy when deciding where and why you want to take your career abroad. Consider the cost of living in the location of your choice, as well as the salaries offered. Regardless of where you work abroad, the $ 1,500 a month you earn at home will not be worth the same abroad. In Argentina, for example, you can live like royalty with late night steak and wine dinners on this salary, while in Norway, you may find that it doesn't even cover your monthly rent. Pay attention to the currencies and research the average costs of living in your country of interest. Decide if you are looking for work abroad to increase your savings account, a job placement that paints an idyllic temporary life, or if you are more interested in the experience of a new place and occupation than the biweekly check.

While you may not have access to scholarships to fund your career aspirations abroad, there are other options to help you work abroad. For example, FundMyTravel is an easy way to advertise your dreams and earn money from both friends and strangers.

STEP 4: BECOME EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR

Jobs abroad often bring together candidates from all over the world; that's a lot of competition. Whether you're interested in teaching kids in Africa, building harps in Wales, or researching coral reefs off the coast of Australia, how do you stand out from the crowd?

Part I: The hunt. You have found the perfect job; Now, all you have to do is get it. Applying online is very different from personally submitting an application or going to an interview. Update your resume, get your qualifications recognized globally, write personalized cover letters, and fill out the application with allusions relevant to the position and its relationship to your life at home.

Part II: The preparation. While finding and landing a job abroad may seem like more work than the actual position, don't relax with the formalities and don't celebrate too soon. You are in the adult world now! International jobs generally don't offer the same tours and packing lists as your high school exchange program or volunteer placement you were a part of last summer. It's time to step up! Begin by doing the following:

Organize your travel documents. Do you remember that visa we mentioned? Now is the time for all the logistics. As you do so, check your passport as well. You may want to make a few copies, just to be safe.

Buy a pocket dictionary. If you are moving to a country where English is not the primary language, review the basic phrases and choose a small dictionary. It may seem silly and touristy at times, but there is wifi reception not everywhere and sometimes calling for the ambulance is more important than staying calm.

Health insurance? If it is not offered through your employer, find out which options work best for you. It also doesn't hurt to have a last check-up at home.

Investigate. Good excuse to watch movies and read colorful blogs. Find out as much as possible about your host country. This will help you not only compile an effective packing list, but also make your mind start to think differently and ease the effects of culture.

In fact, getting a job is difficult for most people. Why? Because, for some strange reason, no one has yet developed a true market for jobs and talent.

In other words, if any other market were as inefficient as the so-called "labor market," we wouldn't call it markets in the first place.

But let's make a bulleted list of some quick specific problems and keep it short. In no particular order:

1. Resume Spam - Job seekers apply for every job they can find, even if they're not really a good fit for that position. Employers know this, so they do their best to filter out all "resume spam."

Keep reading

In fact, getting a job is difficult for most people. Why? Because, for some strange reason, no one has yet developed a true market for jobs and talent.

In other words, if any other market were as inefficient as the so-called "labor market," we wouldn't call it markets in the first place.

But let's make a bulleted list of some quick specific problems and keep it short. In no particular order:

1. Resume Spam - Job seekers apply for every job they can find, even if they're not really a good fit for that position. Employers know this, so they do their best to filter out all "resume spam." As a result, genuinely qualified candidates are more likely to be overlooked.

2. Too expensive to publish most jobs: It is true that there are not enough jobs for everyone, but not for the reasons you think. It turns out that most companies cannot afford to publish most of their work! Surprised? It shouldn't be - standard job posting costs range from $ 75- $ 500 per job posting, by zip code / region, per 30-day period. LinkedIn starts at a ridiculous $ 295. Subscription fees can cost many thousands of dollars for large corporations. So what becomes a major expense for a large company is a virtually disabling expense for smaller companies and startups.

3. Expensive prepaid solutions with no guarantee of real success: For job seekers willing to take a more premium approach, most of the existing options require expensive prepaid job seeker plans that you have to pay for even if you don't. get something out of it. In other words, there is no "pay only if you win" solution. (Actually, there is now, but I'm trying not to make a cheeky plug ... yet. :)) LinkedIn, for example, asks job seekers to pay a staggering $ 30 or $ 50 per month alone to be able to send 5 or 10 InMail messages (unsolicited), respectively, and 15 or 25 "introductions", respectively. First of all, InMail messages don't really work; everyone seems to know now, and secondly, you are still at the mercy of someone else to introduce you. Good luck with that.

4. Expensive prepaid solutions say nothing to employers: So an employer sees that you have paid money to get to the top of the candidate list for all jobs overall. How do they know that you are actually a good fit for their particular job? They do not do it. So either (a) they will still overlook you or (b) they will contact you and 90-95% will likely decide that you are not a good fit after all. Your time and money are a waste. Again.

5. Expensive prepaid or postpaid solutions blatantly benefit wealthier job seekers - these systems are often "promotional" in nature rather than truly functional "filter mechanisms" to precisely match job seekers to jobs perfect for your particular skills. They work effectively like eBay's "promote your item" feature, where you can pay more to enlarge your list, display eye-catching icons, and more. LinkedIn even admits this: "Move your job applications to the top of the candidate list."

6. Psychological and practically exhausting - If you really want to have any chance in the standard "job application with resume" approach, it takes a lot of work and effort and therefore time and therefore money - resumes and letters Diligently crafted presentation slides should be personalized for each and every position for which you are applying. This is exhausting and psychologically draining - job seekers generally never hear from the companies they applied to. It's like when you were in high school (college?) And you finally mustered the courage to call that girl you wanted to take on a movie date, and when she didn't answer her phone, you decided it would be really manly. leave a message. The problem then is that you spent the next few hours or days pacing back and forth in agony waiting for (a) she to finally call you back or (b) it would take another three days to be able to call her again. That sucked then, and it sucks now. With jobs or with girls.

7. No automatic match: Finally, there is no true automatic match between job applicants and the best jobs for their particular skills. For example, this is the 21st century: a job seeker should be able to list their skills, abilities, professions, personal characteristics, personality type and be automatically matched - and contacted by - an employer with the job most relevant to that. particular person, for a few dollars more or less, if and only if the employer really wants to communicate with that person. No application, no waiting, no effort. That would be amazing.

And now, my little plug: our startup, Venturocket.com, has been created specifically to solve points 1 to 6 above precisely by doing the number 7. And that's it, I'm not going to say anything more about this. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

Oh, and by the way, at the end of February 2013, we are ready to hire our first employee! We need a member of the UI / UX team of the amazing website, who hopefully can also use mobile devices. I'm sure you can find out how we would like you to apply. :)

In the 80s and 90s people took risks. If you knew the job, they would take you if they like you. Then things were more pleasant. Today it's all about corporate mindset and profit motives.

  • You have a great international competition of people from India and China who have to get a job to stay in this country. That's your biggest competition right there. America simply allows more and more immigrants to come and take American jobs. Today, wherever you work, all you will find are H1B Indians. In places like Qualcomm, if you are not Indian, I doubt you can get a job. When I int
Keep reading

In the 80s and 90s people took risks. If you knew the job, they would take you if they like you. Then things were more pleasant. Today it's all about corporate mindset and profit motives.

  • You have a great international competition of people from India and China who have to get a job to stay in this country. That's your biggest competition right there. America simply allows more and more immigrants to come and take American jobs. Today, wherever you work, all you will find are H1B Indians. In places like Qualcomm, if you are not Indian, I doubt you can get a job. When I interviewed for Qualcomm, the only white people I saw were in HR hahaha. That was on such a big campus that they had to relocate me!
  • Even a startup will get like 50 apps per job - places like Cisco get 600 apps. Nowadays, getting a job even in a new company can be difficult.
  • The internet black hole will lose your request. Okay, there is literally no other way to say fact or other job sites, your application will just get lost in the confusion. You can try networking, but still hope that no one else will apply who has better skills and a more impressive resume than you. Networking will simply put your resume on top of the manager's desk, after that, you still have to pass the interview like everyone else.
  • The older it gets, the more difficult it becomes: Engineers and technicians typically have a 10-year lifespan, after which they simply wear out. This happens between the ages of 37 and 40. If you find yourself saying that I can't learn anything new anymore or that I'm tired of constantly learning new things, then you're experiencing engineer burnout. The more experience you have, the more money you want and the more difficult it is to secure your high salary. Typically, no one wants to hire a 55-year-old man because management fears that he may not be able to kick butt and that he is outdated and slow. You can't prove it, but I guarantee you that's what they're thinking. Also, what are they doing applying for a job at 55? You should be retired, right? At least that's my philosophy. I think you should enjoy life. 55 is a great time to retire!
  • Don't even bother applying if you don't meet 90% of the skill set - if the job calls for Python and you're a C ++ guy but could get Python in 2 weeks, it still doesn't matter. They would still take a Python type. So unless you specifically match the job specs by up to 90%, you don't even stand a chance. This is because someone will come and say, "I have spent my whole life in Python", even if it is not true. Which brings me to the next point!
  • Most resumes are full of nonsense, meaning most people lie on their resume and exaggerate the experience tailored to the job. If you supervised 2 data analyst interns over the summer for 3 months, this becomes, "I supervised a team of data scientists with a gross margin profit of 1.5 million and created the data science vision for the company". So if your resume has only minor job duties and accomplishments, you just don't stand a chance. People blatantly lie on their resume and during the interview, if you are honest Abe throughout the process, you will never get the job. I don't tell outlandish lies But at least know how to expand and spice up your accomplishments to make it attractive to the employer because no one wants to hire someone who just did their job. Managers want to hire people who did great things and solved difficult problems.
  • Today, people change jobs like changing shorts - tech culture is simply about changing jobs every one to two years. Sometimes contract positions only last 6 months, so you are forced to change jobs. The upshot of all this is that people who don't even need a job are constantly looking elsewhere for a better opportunity. I don't know of a single person who is not constantly looking at job boards, even if they are not interested. They are just curious and if a job comes up that they like, they will just look for it. The modern saying is: "I just went to work and ended up getting the job!" LOL. For some people it is that easy! So you're essentially competing, everyone all the time because, like I said,

And here is my final tip.

Interviews are about finding red flags - literally nothing else! Therefore, most people do not get the job simply because they shot themselves in the foot and made it easy for the employer to eliminate them. For example, in a tech job, you might be asked how you did that project. During your explanation, the interviewer will ask, "Why didn't you do it this way?" or even find a flaw in your approach. Obviously, if they find a flaw in your approach, then they won't hire you. LOL. So there really is no way around it because when they ask you to explain how you solved a problem, they are looking for how you think, if there are flaws in your approach then you are done.

I'd say you have to realize how tough the competition is today. When there are many options and people waiting in line to get the same job, you have no chance unless you show that you are excellent through your experience, projects and the interview.

There are some changes that have radically changed how difficult it is to find a job after college.

Increase in applicants

There are many more students in universities now than ever. That means that when your parents and / or grandparents applied for jobs outside of school, there were only a few applicants for each job, whereas now there are thousands of applications for each entry-level job. See Stats Here: How Millennials Today Compare To Their Grandparents 50 Years Ago

Ease of application

Do you know what cc means, when you cc someone in your email? It means 'carbon copy' because and

Keep reading

There are some changes that have radically changed how difficult it is to find a job after college.

Increase in applicants

There are many more students in universities now than ever. That means that when your parents and / or grandparents applied for jobs outside of school, there were only a few applicants for each job, whereas now there are thousands of applications for each entry-level job. See Stats Here: How Millennials Today Compare To Their Grandparents 50 Years Ago

Ease of application

Do you know what cc means, when you cc someone in your email? It means 'carbon copy' because your parents literally had to type a resume and cover letter on carbon paper to make a copy and send it to someone else. They did not send emails and, in some cases, did not call employers. It made things a lot more difficult to get your job application out. So there were fewer job applications.

Even once computers became prevalent, there were no people using bots to submit their resumes, or students spending hours and hours applying for 500 jobs (rather than focusing on a few at a time and networking). But now, it's not uncommon for people to submit their resumes for jobs they aren't even qualified for, because it's so easy.

Working your way (from a related department)

In the past, you could start working at a company in the mailroom (which was entry level, didn't need a lot of skills) and progress. Someone who started collecting quarters from pay phones could end up being a manager of various departments at a phone company.

That doesn't happen now because there are people who are trained for entry-level jobs, trained through internships. If you are going into product management, you usually have classes in your specialty that prepare you and internships and internships.

Don't get me wrong, you're still working your way up, it's just that you never stray from the path you're on. You start in an internship and / or company department that (in theory) prepares you for the next step. But it's harder if you don't have one because there are so many more students who have that product development internship and who would be called in for interviews before you.

Increased competition

So when you have 500 applicants for an entry-level project management position, hiring managers look for ways to cut down on resumes. Maybe they say they need someone who has graduated in the last six months, and then the number drops to 250, but even if the recruiter spends 10 seconds looking at each resume, it is still around 40 minutes. What the recruiter will spend, but will search for exactly what they want to see and keep resumes that have the most information.

That's why it's easy to go with candidates who have two product management internships or an entry-level product management job because it's easy to see why they are qualified. Although you may have managed a product in an extracurricular activity, that experience is not that easy to find because they are only taking so long (and after about 100 resumes, you just want it to stop).

Not all schools prepare students in the same way *

I worked in schools that required their students to have a LinkedIn profile and do informational interviews using it. So you would have a contact at a company you want to work for because you have already been emailing them.

I worked in schools that required students to do internships because every entry-level job seeks experience.

I have worked in schools that invest a lot of time and resources so that students understand what will happen when they are looking for full-time jobs, so this idea of ​​experience would not be a surprise to you.

I've worked in schools where they do that if you come to the professional services office and make an appointment, but if you don't, then you won't know about any of the resources or do any of that work.

I have heard many people talk about how students should be educated by the faculty and that the faculty should take on a more important role in helping students get a job. But there are a lot of problems with that (see my warning below *), which is another hurdle that explains why it is so difficult to find a decent job.

All job searches are difficult

There usually comes a time in many people's careers where they are approached by hiring managers, but not usually for entry-level jobs (unless you're winning some awards or have a specific type of internship from high level). When someone contacts you out of the blue about a job, it's still work. It's more difficult at the entry level because of societal expectations (cough: I mean your parents), student loan terms, and the perception that all the other recent alumni in your graduating class already have a job. their dreams. (Spoiler: They don't, but social media doesn't lend itself to posting bad news about job hunting, so you probably don't know about the struggle many people have.)

Even people who have done everything right sometimes struggle to get their first job. Even students who are related to the best sometimes find that the roles they are qualified for have no openings when they graduate. The market is tough, so you shouldn't beat yourself up for it.

* Now this comes with a big caveat insert a swear word. I have worked in many schools, including the Ivy League, and the students who need help the most often reject any help given to them. The problem with professional services (and any service outside of university level teaching) is that it is expensive and tuition is high because universities now employ many different departments.

So maybe you think the faculty should have done more? This is an old answer of mine: Should college career service departments live? But this part is still true: who do professors who have industry connections (in any industry) help? The best and the brightest. The # 1 in the class. The person with connections. The ones that will make the school look good in the news. Who does Career Services help? All the world.

But the problem is that in most colleges and universities, the student has to choose to go to professional services. And really students should go early in their career and usually at different times to see if they are on track with what they want. But no one tells them this unless the school makes it a priority. Too often, students who show up year after year are much more prepared and have more network connections than those who don't.

Because qualifications are not the only element in the selection of people for a job offer. Adequate grades are, as mathematicians say, a necessary but not a sufficient condition.

One's personality is a very important factor. Kindness, openness, self-confidence, poise, sincerity, simplicity, and many other personality qualities affect what an interviewer sees as a candidate's potential "fit" with the organization.

The candidate's previous record has a lot to do with the election. It is not enough to have worked for one or more leading companies, in similar types of activity.

Keep reading

Because qualifications are not the only element in the selection of people for a job offer. Adequate grades are, as mathematicians say, a necessary but not a sufficient condition.

One's personality is a very important factor. Kindness, openness, self-confidence, poise, sincerity, simplicity, and many other personality qualities affect what an interviewer sees as a candidate's potential "fit" with the organization.

The candidate's previous record has a lot to do with the election. It is not enough to have worked for one or more leading companies, in similar types of activity. Interviewers look for a distinctive achievement record and advancement pattern if one has a work history of more than a couple of years.

An important, albeit intangible, element is whether the candidate is looking to advance their career or simply wants a job. Naturally, everyone wants an indoor position with a regular salary, but if that is all the interviewer can see, they will likely rule out even a highly qualified candidate. Companies want to hire people whose motivation goes beyond simply performing a function to earn income.

On the other hand, many well-qualified people find it difficult to get a job simply because of the way they search. They simply submit a resume, showing the appropriate qualifications, and assume that reviewers (or screening programs) will be excited to see those qualifications, then automatically bring the applicant in for an interview. That doesn't happen, except perhaps for the few that show great and impressive ratings. Everyone else should provide a meaningful cover letter, personal contact, or some other method of getting attention.

You should avoid jobs that are too dangerous (such as those that do not comply with occupational health and safety regulations). You should avoid jobs with people or situations that you really don't like. For example, if you don't like poor people, don't get a job in Health and Human Services, or if you hate animals, don't work with them. Avoid jobs that violate your morals or religious beliefs, such as jobs that make you eat forbidden foods or jobs that require you to perform illegal or immoral actions. Also, do not do jobs that your spouse or partner really does not want you to do, such as being a police officer or

Keep reading

You should avoid jobs that are too dangerous (such as those that do not comply with occupational health and safety regulations). You should avoid jobs with people or situations that you really don't like. For example, if you don't like poor people, don't get a job in Health and Human Services, or if you hate animals, don't work with them. Avoid jobs that violate your morals or religious beliefs, such as jobs that make you eat forbidden foods or jobs that require you to perform illegal or immoral actions. Also, don't do jobs that your spouse or partner really doesn't want you to do, like being a police officer or a firefighter, if your loved one doesn't really want you to do that.

Apply for multiple jobs, but be specific. Don't ruin your resume with anything on job boards, tailor your resume to specific jobs and apply only to those where you meet the most criteria.

Don't apply for just one job and pin all your hopes on that position. Statistically, the chances of you landing a job through an online application are not great. So don't put all your hopes on one.

Immediately. What are you waiting for?

Seriously, what would you expect?

I can write pages and pages of theories (based on my 20 years of recruiting) about how it is advantageous to apply early ... or late ... or in the middle of the interview process, but you really don't know if that job It will be open for a day or a year. So if you delay your request based on one of those theories…. the job could disappear completely.

Apply now. See what happens.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.