Why is it said that Mr. Richard Feynman broke the concept of IQ?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Bailey Lawson



Why is it said that Mr. Richard Feynman broke the concept of IQ?

Because that's what people want to believe. That's all there is to it, really. What they don't realize is that even if their IQ was 125 I think someone mentioned in an answer that their verbal IQ was lower while their math IQ was higher, I doubt it. I mean, listen to him speak. What people don't realize is that even if IQ wasn't really that big of a factor, there was something that still separated it from many of us. People who criticize IQ and say it is irrelevant want to believe that there is no innate difference in ability, most of the time, which is a lie.

The first time I met Feynman, I was visiting CalTech and I was thinking of transferring there from Berkeley, as a student. I went to the physics department to talk to anyone. The guy I ran into said, “There aren't many people right now. Why don't you talk to Dick? The idea scared me, but what the heck? I sat in his office and waited. I did a little calculation on your board.

When Feynman returned a few minutes later, he first carefully erased my calculation from his board. Then he asked what he wanted to know. I wanted to know if it made sense to transfer from one side to the other

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The first time I met Feynman, I was visiting CalTech and I was thinking of transferring there from Berkeley, as a student. I went to the physics department to talk to anyone. The guy I ran into said, “There aren't many people right now. Why don't you talk to Dick? The idea scared me, but what the heck? I sat in his office and waited. I did a little calculation on your board.

When Feynman returned a few minutes later, he first carefully erased my calculation from his board. Then he asked what he wanted to know. I wanted to know if it made sense to transfer from UC Berkeley to CalTech or Princeton, as a student. He said it didn't really matter, because they were all good schools, where they didn't “feed me”. I agreed that that made sense, I just wanted people to "show me things." That was pretty much that, except when I was leaving, he also left his office. So he ended up taking the same elevator as me. So I said, "Goodbye", and he said "Goodbye"; and somehow I felt uncomfortable with it, so I said "Bye" again, and he said "Bye" again! We could have made it through three rounds before he got out and escaped!

I was impressed that he had been willing to take the time to deal with me, a complete stranger who wasn't even a student at CalTech. I decided to ignore his advice and transfer to CalTech.

When I changed schools, I did a bee line for Physics X, their Monday night question and answer session. I've told that story elsewhere on Quora, so you can find it by looking at my content.

Three times during the year I was there, I ran into Feynman in the cafeteria at lunchtime when he was not with someone else, so he invited me to lunch with him. I remember asking him about the weird way your fingers create shadows with Venetian blinds (he said, “You will feel like an idiot once you find out!” Then I realized that it was due to the finite size of the Sun. )

On another occasion, I commented on the FLoP statement, that for every symmetry there is a conserved quantity (reference to Noether's theorem). So, for translational invariance, there is a linear moment; and for rotational invariance, there is angular momentum. But I thought it was strange that you can't actually change the location of an object; but you CAN change an object's orientation relative to the rest of the universe (the way a cat turns to land on its feet, if it falls from a height). He agreed that it was interesting. In the FLoP statement, he mentioned that conservation of charge also arose from a principle of invariance. I did not follow his statement so I tried to get some clarification. He talked a bit about it, but basically said it was trivial and not very meaningful.

On another occasion, he told me how proud he was of his son, who had discovered that a rope with two loops intertwined was topologically equivalent to the same rope with the two loops unwound.

On another occasion, we talked about how children can pick up patterns quickly: say a transformation from "abcde" to "acbde" after a few examples. I was ruining it, possibly because I felt a bit in the place!

Once, I remember Kip Thorne coming up to our table and asking if Feynman wanted to sign someone's birthday card. He then joked with Thorne: “Who's going to sign your 65th birthday card? How old are you, anyway? Thorne: "35". "35? No wonder you are so much smarter than me! Thorne just smiled and moved on. Feynman continued with his comment: "35? It's just a baby!"

So, I found Feynman very nice. I never tried to impress him (I thought there was no way to win that game), I just asked him what he wanted to know sincerely, so he took all my questions seriously and tried to answer them. If I was messing it up, he let me know he was messing it up; and if he found out (as in the fractional derivative question described elsewhere), he was pleased with that too.

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