Why is it important to know the code?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Ruby Campbell



Why is it important to know the code?

Besides knowing how to program ..?

It is important to know how the world works. * Children are being taught now, and I am a bit conflicted; most will fail or at least not continue to professionally, as most people of any age have; while programming is getting easier.

Today, everyone runs on computers. It doesn't mean that you have to implement any part of it. But learning to program teaches you computational thinking, and that is increasingly important in all aspects of life. You may trust that knowledge more than actual programming. If you say a manager of no

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Besides knowing how to program ..?

It is important to know how the world works. * Children are being taught now, and I am a bit conflicted; most will fail or at least not continue to professionally, as most people of any age have; while programming is getting easier.

Today, everyone runs on computers. It doesn't mean that you have to implement any part of it. But learning to program teaches you computational thinking, and that is increasingly important in all aspects of life. You may trust that knowledge more than actual programming. If you say you are a manager not just software developers, it would help.

The fifth fastest computer in the world, Mira, was used to discover, not just a new material, but a new type of material, the first with a property of superlubricity, by "simulating up to ... 10 million atoms." That is, computational chemistry is replacing real chemistry, as a first step (the results are always later validated in the real world); this is also critical for drug discovery, as i understand it.

Did you know that making cars is now practically illegal without including a computer to control injections? Can you think of any area of ​​human life where computers are not used directly or at least indirectly, say to help with a design process?

* Is it important to learn mathematics (programming can be considered a subset of applied mathematics ...)? I think learning math is, to some extent, for everyday use; and even algebra and calculus, so you know it's out there and it helps you learn physics, and at least some people have to learn it. It is good to wet people's appetites.

Even if computers don't literally tell you how the "world" works (it is a possibility, however, but the jury is still out on digital physics), math and programming also help you think clearly and logically. I believe that programming should be taught to the general public rather than some higher mathematics; or at least math should be taught more with the help of computers.

I know a lot of people who don't say this, so not "everyone" says it.

If you are going to be a software developer (aka a software engineer, computer programmer, etc.), then yes, tight programming is crucial.

If you're not going to be a software developer (aka a software engineer, computer programmer, etc.), then no, tight programming isn't crucial.

There are some specific jobs outside of software development, in which a programming knowledge can be helpful, but you would have to focus on a specific job and decide if you really need to learn programming to get the job and be successful.

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I know a lot of people who don't say this, so not "everyone" says it.

If you are going to be a software developer (aka a software engineer, computer programmer, etc.), then yes, tight programming is crucial.

If you're not going to be a software developer (aka a software engineer, computer programmer, etc.), then no, tight programming isn't crucial.

There are some specific jobs outside of software development, where a knowledge of programming can be helpful, but you would have to focus on a specific job and decide whether or not you really need to learn programming to get the job and be successful at it.

It helps if everyone is exposed to programming at some point, just to get a general appreciation and understanding of the world around us, which is full of smart devices, vehicles, etc. They depend on software to function. This exhibition can also provide a framework for step-by-step logical thinking and problem solving that transcends computers and programming.

But a career as a software developer is not for everyone. See this answer for more details:

Ken Gregg · Updated July 24 Why isn't everyone a programmer? While almost anyone, at almost any age or IQ level, can learn the fundamental concepts of programming, to become a professional, employable software developer with some hope of long-term success. a person needs: * logical thinking skills. * Excellent problem solving skills. * A methodical approach to sun… (more)

Of course, no. Coding is not an essential skill in modern society. Most people will NEVER need to write a single line of code in their lifetime. Not my wife. Not my children or their wives. Not my nephews or their wives. Not even some of my friends (although, to be honest, most of my friends are programmers). They are all very educated people.

On the other hand, most people cannot function properly in the world without knowing how to read and write, without knowing how to do basic arithmetic. That is why they teach the three R's in school.

Having said that, I grant that many people can

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Of course, no. Coding is not an essential skill in modern society. Most people will NEVER need to write a single line of code in their lifetime. Not my wife. Not my children or their wives. Not my nephews or their wives. Not even some of my friends (although, to be honest, most of my friends are programmers). They are all very educated people.

On the other hand, most people cannot function properly in the world without knowing how to read and write, without knowing how to do basic arithmetic. That is why they teach the three R's in school.

Having said that, I recognize that many people can benefit from knowing how to do some coding. However, "can benefit" is not the same as "essential".

The truth is, you should only learn to code if (a) you are interested in doing it recreationally or (b) your job could directly benefit from that skill. My daughter-in-law is a pharmacist and does not want to learn to code, nor should she. My nephew is a manager at Nestlé and he doesn't care the least bit about coding. My wife is a paralegal and uses computers reluctantly; she will never do any coding.

So let's get out of this stupid notion that coding is an important literacy skill. It is not and never will be.

EDIT:

One thing I hear over and over in these answers is that coding will teach you how to think logically and how to solve problems. Guess what? You can also do many other things in life, such as learning to play chess or learning geometry, trigonometry, and calculus. Learning music and playing a musical instrument will also teach you logic and problem-solving skills (make no mistake: there is logic in music).

In other words, learning in general is valuable in life. The encoding doesn't stand out in particular, except that it underpins all modern technology. Coding isn't even the best way to learn logic and solve problems. I would teach people chess and math (not just arithmetic) before teaching them to code. Hey, solving math puzzles is a popular hobby!

This is something that bothers me a bit. The reason computer science is so popular these days is because little Timmy is often told to study computers and get a computer science degree because it's helpful. Sorry, but it's no more useful than a degree in gender studies if you don't like working with computers, to some extent.

Understanding computers is not just a case of taking a 3- or 4-year course. You'd barely be scratching the surface and still feel like a complete jerk. Hell, I feel like an idiot every time I look at my monitor screen. It takes time and dedication and

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This is something that bothers me a bit. The reason computer science is so popular these days is because little Timmy is often told to study computers and get a computer science degree because it's helpful. Sorry, but it's no more useful than a degree in gender studies if you don't like working with computers, to some extent.

Understanding computers is not just a case of taking a 3- or 4-year course. You'd barely be scratching the surface and still feel like a complete jerk. Hell, I feel like an idiot every time I look at my monitor screen. It takes time and dedication and you are only going to continue studying computer science if you like it. You can't just jump into a course and expect to learn about computers, and that's why so many people who study computer science drop out.

You should not learn to code because it is "useful", you should learn to code because you have a goal you want to achieve, you want to make your life easier, you want to automate something, etc. It could be anything that gives you value, but learning to code inadvertently building something is really stupid, in my opinion. People can do whatever they want, of course, but I don't see how to learn to code without creating something fun. I guess we are all different.

Sure, it comes in handy if you hate computers and just want a paycheck, but you will feel miserable, as with any other degree you study just for the earning potential. Many programmers are not very wealthy. Sure, some are making a good amount of money, but they're not making it. If you want to be someone like that, be a business person.

If all you do is interact with computers using your operating system's GUI and your phone's GUI, then you really don't have a reason to study computers. It's as if I decided that I should learn the inner workings of dishwashers, even though I don't even plan on building dishwashers in my life. All I want to do is push a damn button to get my dishes clean.

So no, you DO NOT NEED to learn to code because it is not a requirement to function in life. That's why we have GUI, so non-technical people can interact with the software and don't need to know the details. The questions to ask yourself: “Should I learn to code? How useful would it be in my life? "Learning to code is no more important than learning to sew. Both are useful skills if you really use them.

YES.

1. Coding and Programming Careers Have Great Earning Potential

One of the strongest and most obvious draws to learning to code is the income potential for coding and programming professionals. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) tracks salary and other important workforce information for a variety of careers.

Take a look at the BLS annual median salary information in 2019 for these professions related to coding and programming: 1

  • Web Developers: $ 73,760
  • Computer systems and network administrators: $ 83,510
  • Computer programmers: $ 86,550
  • Database administrators: $ 93,750
  • Software developers: $ 107,510

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YES.

1. Coding and Programming Careers Have Great Earning Potential

One of the strongest and most obvious draws to learning to code is the income potential for coding and programming professionals. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) tracks salary and other important workforce information for a variety of careers.

Take a look at the BLS annual median salary information in 2019 for these professions related to coding and programming: 1

  • Web Developers: $ 73,760
  • Computer systems and network administrators: $ 83,510
  • Computer programmers: $ 86,550
  • Database administrators: $ 93,750
  • Software developers: $ 107,510

To put it in perspective, the national average for all occupations in 2019 was $ 39,810.1 As you can see, careers that involve some programming, coding, or scripting skills tend to have above-average salaries.

2. Demand remains strong for jobs related to coding

What good is a hefty salary if no one is looking to hire for the position? When it comes to coding-related jobs, it seems like there are still plenty of opportunities.

Here are the current BLS projections for job growth in the same coding and programming-related professions:

  • Web Developers: 13%
  • Network and IT system administrators: 5%
  • Computer programmers: -7%
  • Database administrators: 9%
  • Software developers: 21%

3. Coding ability brings a new perspective to problem solving.

"Learning to code has the inadvertent effect of teaching you to think," says Adrian Degus, CEO of Nuvro. He goes on to explain that he used to be more prone to problem solving emotionally. But his coding experience has taught him to approach problems logically.

"Understanding logic, on a deep level, has improved my problem solving skills tenfold," he adds.

Coding, in its most basic terms, is simply assigning a computer a task based on the logical guidelines you have described. Very complex tasks are essentially a collection of smaller operations once you break them down. This methodical and logical approach to problem solving can go a long way in solving problems beyond a coding challenge.

4. Learning to code offers professional flexibility

Learning to code can help you open up new areas of opportunity in your career and ultimately make you a more flexible candidate in a rapidly changing digital economy. Daniel Davidson, started his career in print design, but noticed that he was constantly missing out on opportunities due to a lack of coding skills.

"The greatest skill I've acquired in my professional life has been learning to code," says Davidson. “If I hadn't learned to code, I would have been out of a job years ago. It has been liberating and very lucrative. "

Davidson adds that even if your job doesn't require you to have a deep understanding of coding or programming languages, it's still useful because you likely need to interact with someone else who does. Learning to code, even as a hobby, can give you a common benchmark and a better understanding of those who tackle some of the more complex coding and programming roles out there.

6. Coding can be useful in unexpected jobs

You might think that coding and programming skills are only valuable to people who work in highly technical specialized jobs. While it's true that learning to code is more important for some roles, that doesn't mean you can't find practical ways to apply coding knowledge in non-coding jobs.

Software architect and entrepreneur Mark Billion says his coding skills have benefited him in unexpected ways as a business professional.

"We were able to use Python to code our advertising algorithms, which also saved us about $ 1,000 per month," explains Billion. "So if you're in a business, any kind of business, coding is essential."

The ability to code allowed Billion to automate household tasks that ultimately saved him money. That's a huge advantage for small businesses where budgets are often very tight.

For those who work closely with programmers and developers, learning the basics of coding can make them a much more valuable member of a team.

Lastly, I highly recommend learning it from STARWEAVER as a regular customer of their courses. Provides the best courses for learning coding, data science, and machine learning. Active, hands-on, app-based learning is provided to become an absolute PRO in my opinion.

I will answer you, but first of all, I apologize for my language because it is not my mother tongue.

Computer programming plays an integral role in our world. You couldn't write this question or read this comment without him. We use many different activities in our lives that depend on applications based on programming languages ​​or code. Whether it's using the phone, browsing the Internet, or buying and selling. Programming has become the workings of our world today.

Therefore, our dealing with programming languages ​​or machine languages ​​should be no less important than our

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I will answer you, but first of all, I apologize for my language because it is not my mother tongue.

Computer programming plays an integral role in our world. You couldn't write this question or read this comment without him. We use many different activities in our lives that depend on applications based on programming languages ​​or code. Whether it's using the phone, browsing the Internet, or buying and selling. Programming has become the workings of our world today.

Therefore, our dealings with programming languages ​​or machine languages ​​should not be less important than our human languages. Although this subject may require a period of time until it reaches it to be considered one of the basic skills taught in schools, such as reading and mathematics.

Programming teaches you a wide variety of skills:

  • Programming relies primarily on critical logical thinking to find appropriate solutions to problems, so the programmer breaks the problem down into small parts and uses creative thinking and problem-solving skills to tackle it properly.
  • Scheduling makes your life easier
  • Programming teaches you to persevere:

The life of a programmer is the life of trial, error, and repetition, so there is no room for assumptions, so writing any program is not done without a set of sudden problems that can appear from time to time, even solutions that fit in At some stage, it may need modification and development after that, so programming teaches you to insist and determination, and makes you patient in facing problems and trying to solve them properly, until you reach the stage of success. .

I hope I have explained the idea to you well

I think everyone should have the "opportunity", yes. And definitely from a young age, it's much easier to fully understand if you start early. With the following conditions (ordered from most important to least important):

It should not be a forced subject, but an elective one. Not everyone is capable of (or even wants to) become a programmer, but an introductory course might introduce some who might otherwise never have thought of it. And even if they don't see it as a career option, it could be a very useful tool in almost any future career. So maybe a single year of programming will introduce

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I think everyone should have the "opportunity", yes. And definitely from a young age, it's much easier to fully understand if you start early. With the following conditions (ordered from most important to least important):

It should not be a forced subject, but an elective one. Not everyone is capable of (or even wants to) become a programmer, but an introductory course might introduce some who might otherwise never have thought of it. And even if they don't see it as a career option, it could be a very useful tool in almost any future career. So maybe a single year of introductory programming for everyone, but subsequent years will be an elective.

As long as the implementation is done well and the students find it “fun”, it should work very positively. If they are not met, then it will become something they "hate". Even students who would have otherwise learned it on their own can dismiss it due to such a bad experience. So first things first: Teachers should be properly taught, preferably these teachers should be obtained from real professional coding backgrounds.

After the introductory introductory course, the focus should be on proper hands-on programming. Starting with the basics of data structures and algorithms, theories and practical implementations. But also collaborative programming where the class (or at least the groups in the class) work together on projects. This so that they learn how it "really" works in the "real world".

And throughout the course, a general principle should be a primary goal: problem solving. That is, if any request, problem, task, etc. is given, the student should be taught how to try to break it down into simpler sub-tasks so that coding is possible. This is the very basis of programming. Even knowing everything about data structures, algorithms, collaborative programming is not enough. Without these problem-solving skills, a coder / programmer is lost when assigned a general task.

Language choice is actually much less of a concern. Almost any decent language would be conducive to learning coding / programming. It may be wise to choose a few languages ​​that are commonly used in the profession. But the course should try to become language agnostic, at least in the later stages. Perhaps introducing new languages ​​in later years. Starting by redoing some previous projects in a completely different paradigmatic language (eg starting with procedural, moving to object-oriented, finally making functional, etc. - not necessarily in that order). I would avoid languages ​​that force some specific paradigm from the initial stages, if starting from procedures you do not choose a language that imposes object-orientation (for example,

The specifics of the tools should be kept to a minimum. For example, if you are teaching Visual Studio, then call the course "Microsoft Programming." Instead, allow (and even teach) various tools. It might be preferable to use non-IDE tools, at least after the introduction stages. For example, schedule editors, standalone compilers, profiling tools, external / remote debuggers, etc.

We all want our students to gain the life skills they need to achieve academic, personal, and eventually professional success. But with so many important skills and extracurricular activities available for them to learn, it can be difficult to know what to prioritize.

Coding is a skill that stands out in the modern age. It offers children a boost in important life, social, and educational skills, as well as an edge in their future careers. It may seem difficult to understand why encoding is right for your child. We are here to help and share information that can help you understand and decide.

In AlphaJ

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We all want our students to gain the life skills they need to achieve academic, personal, and eventually professional success. But with so many important skills and extracurricular activities available for them to learn, it can be difficult to know what to prioritize.

Coding is a skill that stands out in the modern age. It offers children a boost in important life, social, and educational skills, as well as an edge in their future careers. It may seem difficult to understand why encoding is right for your child. We are here to help and share information that can help you understand and decide.

In AlphaJunior Coding Classes, Here Are Our Top 3 Reasons Every Kid Should Learn To Code

1. Programming helps children learn to solve problems

The ability to solve problems is a useful trait in life in general. We all want our children to become excellent problem solvers so that they can overcome whatever adversity they face. Learning to code gives children the opportunity to learn this kind of skill while they are young and can help them along the path of life. This is one of the benefits of coding for students.

Understanding computers and learning the basics of coding helps children develop an appreciation for how things work. Our world has so many problems that need to be solved, from garbage recycling to precise weather patterns.

Because coding is easy to learn, especially for children, confidence is easy. When children learn to code, it gives them the opportunity to be confident and create something in a fun and exciting way.

2. Coding offers a new way of looking at the world

Computer code is a way of describing reality, like English or any other language. A programming language, like any natural language, has its own grammar and syntactic rules. So learning to code is a lot like learning a second language and offers many of the same benefits.

Kids learning code will have to take a vague idea and use their creativity to turn it into something effective. If the first solution doesn't work, they try another. If that doesn't work, they try again until the issue is resolved. Coding helps develop this way of thinking and these types of thinking skills are highly sought after.

3. Coding encourages creativity

Coding is one of the few creative places that results in truly interactive work, and there is nothing more exciting for children than interacting with their own creations. This serves as a great complement to other creative venues, giving kids another way to bring their artistic ideas to life. Taking a mental image and shaping it in the real world is the very heart of creativity. That is why we say that we are not creating coders, but creators who can take a dream and turn it into reality. This is why everyone should learn to code.

Programming!

As someone with no technical knowledge, the word "Programming" itself would be enough to send shivers down your spine. So, you must be thinking 'Why should I try hard to learn Programming?

Well programmers are in high demand around the world and the median salary for a computer programmer is $ 100,000k per year. And with the advent of artificial intelligence and the threat of many jobs becoming automated, you don't have to freak out at all, because it will be you who will help automate tasks as a computer programmer! Also, there are still many systems for the nex

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Programming!

As someone with no technical knowledge, the word "Programming" itself would be enough to send shivers down your spine. So, you must be thinking 'Why should I try hard to learn Programming?

Well programmers are in high demand around the world and the median salary for a computer programmer is $ 100,000k per year. And with the advent of artificial intelligence and the threat of many jobs becoming automated, you don't have to freak out at all, because it will be you who will help automate tasks as a computer programmer! Also, there are still many systems for the next several decades that still require human intelligence, along with the ability to write code, making this a very safe work option.

Now that we know the importance of scheduling, let's understand what exactly it is!

To answer that, let me ask you a question! How do humans communicate with each other? Humans use a common language to talk to each other, don't we?

Similarly, if we have to talk to a computer, we need to learn a language that the computer can understand! And this is where a programming language comes into play.

So, simply put, we solve real-world problems by speaking to the computer in a language that you really understand.

Let's take the example of a calculator!

When, he enters '1234 * 4321' into the calculator. It immediately shows you, the result is '5,332,114'. How could the calculator do this multiplication?

This was possible because you wrote in a simple program to multiply two numbers that the calculator can understand.

Similarly, when you ask Siri, what is the distance between the sun and the Earth, it will immediately answer: "The distance is 148.63 million km".

Now, how is this possible?

This is possible, because there is a program running in the background that takes the audio input, converts it to a language that 'SIRI' can understand, processes the information and gives an output.

Now, let's take a look at some salary statistics for people who are adept at programming.

According to LinkedIn, the median salary for a computer programmer in the United States is $ 100,000 per year and Rs 8,000,000 per year in India.

Also someone who has programming skills can fit anywhere in any organization.

You can be a UI / UX developer and be responsible for applying visual and interactive design principles to websites and applications. According to Glassdoor, the average salary for a UI / UX developer is $ 75,000 per year in the US and 6 lakhs per year.

Or you can be a back-end developer and ensure that the data or services requested by a user through the frontend system is delivered through programmatic means. The average backend developer salary would be $ 90,000 per year in the US and 8 lakhs per year in India.

If you like both front-end and back-end, why not become a full-stack developer and handle everything from user interface to back-end databases. Average salary for a Full Stack developer would be $ 115,000 in the US and 13 lakhs per year in India

The best part is, you don't have to limit yourself to traditional software development roles. If you like working with data and are analytically minded, you can work as a data scientist or as a machine learning engineer.

And when it comes to paid packages from those in the data science field, they can run up to $ 300,000.

Well, this should be good enough motivation for you to start learning to code!

You should not ...

But coding is something that you're already doing, more or less, in real life. Have you ever put a picture on the wall? The actions to do it sound like code to me ...

  1. Pickup (hammer, right hand) 
  2. Pickup (nail, left hand) 
  3. Put (nail, wall) 
  4. Repeat 
  5. Hammer.Hit (nail) 
  6. Up (Nail, deep enough) 
  7. Release (nail) 
  8. Release (hammer) 
  9. Pick up (paint, both hands) 
  10. Hanging Painting (Nail) 

Sounds like code to me… :-)

Everything you do might look like code, but we don't generally experience it as such. When you are an old software developer like me, you will start to see actions, conditions and repetitions in everything you do. Even in simple th

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You should not ...

But coding is something that you're already doing, more or less, in real life. Have you ever put a picture on the wall? The actions to do it sound like code to me ...

  1. Pickup (hammer, right hand) 
  2. Pickup (nail, left hand) 
  3. Put (nail, wall) 
  4. Repeat 
  5. Hammer.Hit (nail) 
  6. Up (Nail, deep enough) 
  7. Release (nail) 
  8. Release (hammer) 
  9. Pick up (paint, both hands) 
  10. Hanging Painting (Nail) 

Sounds like code to me… :-)

Everything you do might look like code, but we don't generally experience it as such. When you are an old software developer like me, you will start to see actions, conditions and repetitions in everything you do. Even simple things like drinking coffee or wiping your butt.

But most people don't realize that they are following some pre-programmed instructions every day of their lives. They just follow the instructions they have received in some way and generally follow them. And when you explain these instructions to someone else, you are technically "loading" your "code" into their brains. So, somehow, you're already coding ...

The thing is, when you're programming a computer, you have a very limited way of telling the computer what instructions to follow. This means that it is generally slower to program a computer than to "program" another human. But the computer will generally do what you told it to do. Humans tend to do what they think is best and therefore may ignore some instructions ...

So you've basically been "coding" your whole life ... ;-)

Put aside the engineers and scientists for a moment (for whom coding is almost inescapable to one degree or another):

  • Coding teaches discipline: a logical and rational thought process. Everyone needs this ability, many think they have it, most don't. I would teach code to my kids for this reason alone. People who have never developed strong analytical skills usually end up as victims in life.
  • The code is everywhere: we live in the age of machines and technology. If you can code, you are authorized. I write Python programs to help manipulate Excel spreadsheets and do financial planning (including portfolio ma
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Put aside the engineers and scientists for a moment (for whom coding is almost inescapable to one degree or another):

  • Coding teaches discipline: a logical and rational thought process. Everyone needs this ability, many think they have it, most don't. I would teach code to my kids for this reason alone. People who have never developed strong analytical skills usually end up as victims in life.
  • The code is everywhere: we live in the age of machines and technology. If you can code, you are authorized. I write Python programs to help manipulate Excel spreadsheets, and I do financial planning (including portfolio management). I wrote a program to help me tune my car; and creating an IoT solution for my home before IoT existed ... the list is endless.
  • Coding makes you useful. My wife recently created a simple program that automated a manual process at her workplace. Guess who got a huge bonus as a result?

On the other hand, coding is a gateway to new future careers. Do you want to do data science? Do you understand how information is used and how it can directly affect our lives? Learn data science. So what do you need to get started in data science? Yes. You need some basic coding skills (Python, R as examples)

These days, learning the basics of coding is similar to basic literacy. It may be that, over time, computers will become sophisticated enough not to require programmers. In which case, the encoding can become an anachronism; but that hasn't happened yet. Judging from the slow progress we are making on true AI, I'd say there is at least 20 years to go to that day; And until that day comes, coding remains an important life skill.

We have always had ways of teaching the logical thinking process, but unfortunately we increasingly live in an age of instant gratification and adversarial games. A better investment is toys and hobbies that develop rational thinking. In my youth we didn't have computers, but we had electronic Lego, mechano, and DIY kits. These days we have a world of possibilities - encoding is part of that world.

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