Why, even after passing the technical round, did HR reject me based on salary negotiation?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Jack Barker



Why, even after passing the technical round, did HR reject me based on salary negotiation?

Very bad experience from one of the so-called companies. I was recommended by one of my friends who is working on one of the government projects and they are looking for an Operations Manager with more than 10 years of experience to manage their clients' data center.

  1. He called me for the interview after 1 month since they posted that there is a vacancy
  2. It took them around 8 hours to take my interview as they were busy with the meeting and asked me to come back in the afternoon at 6.30pm. M.
  3. I passed the technical and management round and clearly mentioned my CTC and expected CTC (it is 20% more than my previous
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Very bad experience from one of the so-called companies. I was recommended by one of my friends who is working on one of the government projects and they are looking for an Operations Manager with more than 10 years of experience to manage their clients' data center.

  1. He called me for the interview after 1 month since they posted that there is a vacancy
  2. It took them around 8 hours to take my interview as they were busy with the meeting and asked me to come back in the afternoon at 6.30pm. M.
  3. I passed the technical and administrative round and clearly mentioned my CTC and expected CTC (it is 20% more than my previous salary)
  4. I was waiting to be contacted by RR. race to provide the bank statement, even though I have emailed them.
  5. After 4 days, I received a call from the HR manager stating that we can only pay you the same salary that you previously earned. I said that the new role would have high expectations of me. And I even got a call from the Head of Operations to negotiate the salary (no one expects HR to handle the salary negotiation.
  6. Finally, I accepted the same CTC, but HR rejected my candidacy stating that I was not friendly in conversation when I was negotiating the CTC. This is what happens when you give 2 months of time to a supposed company and they reject you like that.

You should have clearly defined your desired salary expectations before starting the technical round of interviews.

Each organization has established rules or benchmarks regarding salary based on the roles offered to employees.

If your expectation exceeds the limit, HR has the option to reject the candidate.

Budget is always a concern everywhere. So your last salary is good enough and on top of that you are asking for a 40-60% raise, so it usually goes beyond the industry standard and your budget so in those cases they put the resource on hold. and then they reject it.

As a headhunter since I was 23 years old, I prepare, train and conduct negotiations between candidates and employers on a daily basis.

Here are some tactics you can use to your advantage in salary negotiations:

# 1. Be extremely nice from the beginning and onward.

While this is not a straightforward "how-to" to negotiate your salary indicator, this is a crucial differentiator between someone who is well paid and someone who is not. Knowing that interviewers are unconsciously biased and human, you can harness your emotions to YOUR benefit.

What this means is that you intensify your charm! Ask open-ended questions to help you

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As a headhunter since I was 23 years old, I prepare, train and conduct negotiations between candidates and employers on a daily basis.

Here are some tactics you can use to your advantage in salary negotiations:

# 1. Be extremely nice from the beginning and onward.

While this is not a straightforward "how-to" to negotiate your salary indicator, this is a crucial differentiator between someone who is well paid and someone who is not. Knowing that interviewers are unconsciously biased and human, you can harness your emotions to YOUR benefit.

What this means is that you intensify your charm! Ask open-ended questions to get your interviewer open. Use compliments. Get them to be YOUR advocate and want YOU to beat it. Make sure they like you more than your competition. This could be your best advantage.

Simply by being more outgoing, interesting, conscientious, and empathetic, creating a relationship, and asking your interviewer questions beyond the normal stuff of work, you'll become more desirable.

# 2. Play offense: plan and share your salary wishes from the very first conversation.

I am NOT in favor of holding the cards near the chest. I've seen those attitudes disrupt negotiations and make the candidate look super shady and immature. Any adult should know what money he wants, what he would like to see, and what he would not want.

Those are the 3 numbers you need to know yourself. It's the Goldilocks combo:

a. Highest / ideal target salary that will guarantee acceptance and rejection of the accountant.

B. Median / Average Salary You Know You Can Earn.

Y C. The no-go number, also known as don't waste my time or can't live on less than X.

Be proactive and express your needs and opinions when it comes to money. Keep the door open but provide a solid range.

# 3. Minimize money needs until later in the process.

I've seen candidates get out of the game early on by going after a cake-in-the-sky number, being obnoxious, and stubbornly / arrogantly professing statements like "if he's not in X, don't even give me those opportunities." This is exactly how you can prevent useful connections from getting close to you.

Instead, firmly state your wishes, but leave the door open. It is better to network and learn about all the exciting happenings in your industry rather than saying NO to yourself. When the going gets tough and the employer falls in love with you, they'll find a way to spend that extra budget to hire you.

Be smart about saying something like “well, ideally, I'd be more motivated at an X pace, but your proposition sounds interesting. I wouldn't mind discussing / networking, however my financial requirements are the same. There won't be much room to be flexible, however I am willing to be open minded and always happy to network. "

# 4. Use counter offers and competitive offers.

As I said, there are no magic words to push an employer to pay more than someone's necessary value; Businesses are for profit, not charities.

The only 2 things that could make a real difference is the competition in the market:

a. For those who are employed, always take advantage of the risk of counter offers. Your business is most likely trying to retain you because of the astronomical cost retention issues they create for businesses. Let future employers know that you are waiting for a counter, so the offer should be in the X range to be attractive.

B. For those who are unemployed or employed, line up as many offer opportunities as you can so that you can start educating your employers on what other employers are willing to pay for your skill set, thus ensuring you receive an offer similar to the one below. that the market is getting. .

This requires you to effectively promote yourself and line up multiple interview opportunities. Use LinkedIn by reaching out to hiring managers en masse; It's a numbers game.

# 5. Use all the compensation components to try to rank the offer values ​​to make the optimal decision.

Learn about all the different aspects of your compensation that are common and valuable in your industry. Do you get free lunch, 6% 401k, unlimited vacation days, work from home all you want, and many other perks? If so, understand the true value of what you may be leaving behind.

Your new salary should incorporate and account for all lost benefits from what you have in your current position. This is to minimize "buyer's remorse". Make sure you are not simply surprised by a large number and forgot to factor in the lost benefits, as well as the comfortable work-life balance. Some things are not monetary and focusing on dollars and cents could actually make you feel more miserable in the long run.

Sometimes it is better to stay in a comfortable environment that takes care of you mentally and adapts to your stage of life. Never forget the holistic picture of your setup and then regret your decision.

Finally, the n. 6. Never rely on your income to survive.

As you go through life, your goals should evolve. Instead of relying on income numbers to survive, become an investor. That way, you're protected no matter which way the work winds blow. To depend on a salary is to be tied to the rat race. Whether you are a CEO or a beginner, as long as you depend on your salary to live, you are always at risk from the whims of others.

Understand, decide and move forward to become an investor. Learn how to make your money work for you.

I hope these ideas help you approach your job search and salary negotiation with the right mindset and attitude!

1. Don't start by asking "What would my salary be?"

The first is to never start a conversation with HR by asking "What will my salary be?" Well! This is rude. You should never give a number or file a lawsuit in front of your HR.

In fact, your HR should ask you “what is your expected salary”. So wait until your HR asks about your salary.

Typically, the fresh out of college makes this mistake and gives a bad impression of himself.

Therefore, avoid asking about salary when starting out.

2. Show your worth

You need to impress your HR that you are carrying out your inte

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1. Don't start by asking "What would my salary be?"

The first is to never start a conversation with HR by asking "What will my salary be?" Well! This is rude. You should never give a number or file a lawsuit in front of your HR.

In fact, your HR should ask you “what is your expected salary”. So wait until your HR asks about your salary.

Typically, the fresh out of college makes this mistake and gives a bad impression of himself.

Therefore, avoid asking about salary when starting out.

2. Show your worth

You must impress your HR that you are conducting your interview. During the course of the interview, you must prove yourself that you are the most capable person for a particular job.

The human resources department should get the impression that the candidate you are talking to is perfect for the position.

You must have to develop that type of personality and this is very important for a successful salary negotiation. It's best to find out early in the interview.

3. Listen, understand and respond to the interviewer

For successful salary negotiation, you must listen, understand, and then respond to the hiring manager. You have to listen patiently, word for word, to what your HR is trying to say.

You need to understand what he wants from you. Once you understand your problem, you must respond appropriately.

I mean, your answer must be convincing to him.

4. Show interest in discussing your work.

While the interview is taking place, you should show interest to the hiring manager. You must have done all the necessary research related to your job profile.

To make your conversation more interesting, you need to be able to present some valuable facts and related data.

So good research for your work is very important.

5. Try to persuade or convince that you have enough experience to do your job

During the course of the interview, you need to persuade your HR that you are the perfect candidate for the job the company wants.

A salary negotiation is only successful when the hiring manager is totally convinced of you.

To persuade, in addition to a good academic qualification and skills, you need a developed personality.

Therefore, do your research thoroughly about the job you are applying for.

6. Keep your personal life away while chatting

During the discussion, you should never include your personal life. This is another bad way. If you have problems in your personal life or are having a difficult time, you must be mentally prepared enough to hide your problems.

Throughout the conversation, HR shouldn't get the impression that you're in trouble and want a job right away.

7. Be prepared to adapt to the work culture of the position

Always in a job interview it is very normal that HR expects something from you and you expect something from HR.

So, if your job is a bit challenging, you need to be able to adapt to the work culture. It can be work hours, coworkers, etc.

If you want a good salary, you have to make small commitments in your life.

8. Appreciate what the interviewee wants from you

Finally, a salary negotiation is only successful when you are able to appreciate what the hiring manager wants from you.

A job requires certain skills and other requirements from a candidate and they must be able to meet all of those requirements.

If you appreciate HR, in return, he too will understand what you want.

9. Be realistic about your salary expectations

After all the discussion and speech, you get to the bottom. And the bottom line would be your HR salary expectation.

Your expectation must be realistic. That is, if a job can pay you a salary of Rs 40,000 / - to Rs 50,000 / - per month, then it should not demand Rs 100,000 / - per month.

For a job with a salary of Rs 40,000 / - you could expect HR to rise up to Rs 50,000 / - to Rs 60,000 / - at best, but not Rs 100,000 / -.

So keep in mind that your salary expectation needs to be genuine and HR could meet that demand.

10. Nothing is final, so be flexible

Flexibility is a great attribute that you could have. In a salary negotiation, you must always be willing to concede something if you want to win something.

So be flexible and stick to your job.

If HR is willing to pay you more, you need to adapt to the work culture.

Therefore, nothing is final here and you must be able to adjust to get the best salary.

11. DO NOT beg and be ready to walk away from the interview

If you think the entire salary negotiation is not successful or fruitful, you need to be confident enough to walk away from the interview.

This is not the last chance for you. You will get a lot of jobs like these and even the best sarkari naukri.

You should not beg as if you are desperate for work. If you feel like you are not getting the amount you deserve, politely walk away.

Not all salary negotiations are successful. The responsibility is not only on one side but on both sides.

To carry out a salary negotiation follow the 11 tips mentioned above. These are essential for a successful salary negotiation.

These are the points that I follow

All credits to.

(Safe Jobs, Priyanka Nagrale).

just a few quick notes and a few ramblings.

You can negotiate and offer "anytime" before accepting and starting. As long as you haven't accepted the offer letter, the whole 'bargaining' is still up for grabs.

That being said, if you do try to counter offer, prepare to get rejected, why ??? because that's your right.

The offer they made is considered an "A" offer.

Once you counter that, it is now considered a "new offer" and is now a "B" offer. They can accept or deny your offer for more money. That is contract law.

That said, once you make the Offer-B / Counter Offer; It is considered by default that

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just a few quick notes and a few ramblings.

You can negotiate and offer "anytime" before accepting and starting. As long as you haven't accepted the offer letter, the whole 'bargaining' is still up for grabs.

That being said, if you do try to counter offer, prepare to get rejected, why ??? because that's your right.

The offer they made is considered an "A" offer.

Once you counter that, it is now considered a "new offer" and is now a "B" offer. They can accept or deny your offer for more money. That is contract law.

That said, once you make the Offer-B / Counter Offer; It is considered by default that you "Rejected and Rejected" Offer-A. That means, by default, Offer-A is no longer available. Unless they respond, we only offer you the Terms of Offer-A. (This is how the law contract works)

To accept Offer-A; you must accept it "as is" without any changes.

That said, both offers are still way better than your current salary. And they are very close to each other at just 1K.

Take the one close to home. Do not move. When you move, that leads to costs, rent, food, being further and away from home more often, traveling back and forth. That reduces your 'net' salary.

In the end, don't look at the money.

See which one offers the best promotional opportunities; which will improve your technical and business skills. Take that one. Then be patient, stick around for 2-3 years, then update your resume and jump in. Learn all you can. And practice "Updating your resume every 6 months with the new skills you learned on the job." Don't jump too much at work in a short time. Employers don't like that.

Also look to improve your skill set by seeing if there are "Certifications" in your field and earning them. Get certified.

That being said, I know there is a tech boom in India so the industry is paying well and there are plenty of opportunities. So be patient and you will get there. Just one step at a time.

Good luck!!!

This is an important issue. I'm going to assume you've been there for some time, so let me tell you a story.

In my work team I have two coworkers who do the same job. One has been with the company for more than twelve years and the other five. The clerk who's been there for twelve years is knowledgeable, but grumpy. Why is he grumpy? Part of the reason is that the other employee who has only been with the company for less than half the time earns more than $ 15K more per year. He is also a horrible employee who did not do long. How is it possible that I am doing so much more?

As cost of living and

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This is an important issue. I'm going to assume you've been there for some time, so let me tell you a story.

In my work team I have two coworkers who do the same job. One has been with the company for more than twelve years and the other five. The clerk who's been there for twelve years is knowledgeable, but grumpy. Why is he grumpy? Part of the reason is that the other employee who has only been with the company for less than half the time earns more than $ 15K more per year. He is also a horrible employee who did not do long. How is it possible that I am doing so much more?

As the cost of living and competition increase year after year, so do starting salaries. The newest employee was hired with a higher starting salary. The company has a set percentage of increase per year, which means that without a major promotion, the older employee will never be able to do what the newer employee does.

I was in the same boat as you. I was outdone year after year until I realized that major promotions are limited and climbing the business chain is difficult, if not impossible, in some companies. It's even more difficult when you have employees in leadership positions who stay with the company forever.

I started looking for other opportunities and found that all of them paid more than I made. I left that company after finding a new one that offered me a 20% increase on what I was earning.

My advice is that if your company doesn't see its value, find another that does. You are responsible for the outcome of your own career.

This is very common. There is still room to negotiate. By now you've probably learned a few lessons, but I usually try to dodge this question for as long as possible because you don't want to give a number first. Turn your conversation around the role / setting / culture of the team.

If you give them your number right away, they may think that you are desperate for the job and that the number you gave is probably at its highest end (desired salary).

HR asks a tricky question by phrasing it "what is the minimum wage you would be looking for". If you are naive, you will lower yourself and give a rank with your min and m

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This is very common. There is still room to negotiate. By now you've probably learned a few lessons, but I usually try to dodge this question for as long as possible because you don't want to give a number first. Turn your conversation around the role / setting / culture of the team.

If you give them your number right away, they may think that you are desperate for the job and that the number you gave is probably at its highest end (desired salary).

HR asks a tricky question by phrasing it "what is the minimum wage you would be looking for". If you are naive, you will rush yourself and give them a range with their minimum and maximum numbers that you would agree with, in the hope that they will come back with a higher bid. But HR will use the minimum wage number you provided because you said you agree with that.

So when you get this question, always answer with the highest salary range. If you think your market value is $ 100,000, answer with $ 120,000, not $ 90-100,000 (and then you will have to deal with an offer of $ 85,000).

If you talk about salary, avoid the back and forth and just give them a number that you would be happy with. If the offer is low, tell them that it is below market value. If you have a competitive offer on the table, include it in the conversation now and use it as a lever. Its price and value just went up. At this point, you can also ask them what the salary range is for this position (they probably won't share it) and if there is room to increase it, whatever you are looking for. If they go down again, get your full package back in other ways: vacation days, work from home once a week, relocation or login bonus, or whatever you need.

Let me start by telling you my position. I would never dream of changing jobs without increasing my salary between 25% and 33%. So from the start I would say my salary requirements would be $ 125,000-135,000 if my current salary is $ 100,000.

My response to an offer that does not reach the low range would be: “I was very excited to know that you were interested in my experience because I saw a lot of potential in your company and I thought we were a good couple. However, the salary you offered is not in the acceptable range. Is there room in your budget to take me to my $ 125,000 minimum?

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Let me start by telling you my position. I would never dream of changing jobs without increasing my salary between 25% and 33%. So from the start I would say my salary requirements would be $ 125,000-135,000 if my current salary is $ 100,000.

My response to an offer that does not reach the low range would be: “I was very excited to know that you were interested in my experience because I saw a lot of potential in your company and I thought we were a good couple. However, the salary you offered is not in the acceptable range. Is there room in your budget to take me to my $ 125,000 minimum? "

I was once told that the position I applied for did not meet that rank. So I suggested that we find a title that meets that range with room to grow. Suddenly I went from manager to director and got my bare minimum.

Always expect the bid to be in the low range, the higher simply indicates a higher target. If you get the most, you have nowhere to go without a promotion. Keep in mind that if you arrive as a Director, rather than a manager, your new boss looks good because he has a “Director” who reports to him. I'm just saying it's a win / win.

In fact, I had this conversation with the HR director of a company I worked for. He told me that the biggest mistake a person can make is not negotiating at all and that it happens too often. Says so:

Hi, I'm Mary Smith from ABC Corp. Thank you for interviewing us. We are pleased to offer you the xyz role for $ n per year. "

"Thanks, when do I start?"

Accepting the first thing the company offers, even if it is excellent, is a sign of desperation and a lack of experience and insight and calls into question the company's decision to hire a newbie.

The best answer is sa

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In fact, I had this conversation with the HR director of a company I worked for. He told me that the biggest mistake a person can make is not negotiating at all and that it happens too often. Says so:

Hi, I'm Mary Smith from ABC Corp. Thank you for interviewing us. We are pleased to offer you the xyz role for $ n per year. "

"Thanks, when do I start?"

Accepting the first thing the company offers, even if it is excellent, is a sign of desperation and a lack of experience and insight and calls into question the company's decision to hire a newbie.

The best answer is to say: “I am delighted with the offer. I am really excited about the company and the offering. Can I take a day to think about it? "To which Mary Smith is going to say," Please take as much time as you need. Maybe we can talk about ... again. "

And then hang up the phone, punch, think about the offer, and then consider what MORE you want. Even if they are giving you more than you ever dreamed you would receive, they are withholding something and EXPECTING you to ask for more. If you don't, they lose respect for you.

So at the very least, ask for a little more money, even if it is a symbolic amount. ALWAYS ask for another vacation week. You can ask for a good place to park; an office instead of a cubicle; the right to work from home one day a week; a cell phone or a company car - absolutely ANYTHING is on the table. Ask for it. Make a list. Choose the things that will make you happiest. Then when you call them back, say, “Well Mary Smith, I have thought of your generous offer to work at xyz and am excited to start as soon as possible, however I think the salary should be n + yy due to the additional responsibilities I will need xyz ".

I know what you are thinking: you are embarrassed to ask for more. Get over. They hope you order more. Develop a cold and hard heart and ask. They are not going to say, “You fucking bastard! We change our mind! Get lost! "They will counter with some of what you want or, if they are playing hard, they will reject anything you ask for. Then you must decide whether you want to continue. A successful negotiation is one in which both parties feel good about concluding. If you walk away feeling somehow cheated, cheated, or used, it won't help your motivation and it's not the way to start a new company. If you screw them to the wall so hard that they feel like you're being unreasonable, then you better be ready to walk on water the day you start because you will be expecting miracles from someone who demanded so much.

And don't forget, you don't need to explain WHY you want what you want. That's just a whimper. Never get into the "why". Just go into the "what" of the lawsuits. Why you want it is none of their business.

Once I was offered a job in a company where the pay was so much higher than what I was making at the time that my heart was beating like a hammer. However, I asked for $ 5,000 more a year. My manager said, "We are already at the top of the pay scale and I cannot give you more money, but I am prepared to offer more stock options and an extra week of vacation." I accepted the job. The extra week of vacation was incredible and with the extra 5,000 shares of stock (reduced on the purchase of the company in a reverse 6-to-1 split) they ended up worth more than $ 150,000. Hurrah.

And whatever you negotiate, make sure it's in the offer letter. Don't do anything with a handshake or someone's "word". If it is not written, it never happened. They played you. Happens all the time. Write it down, ask them to sign it, keep it in a safe place.

You better do this.

Send an email thanking them for their time. Highlight 3 points of them that you agree with or that you enjoyed.

Offer that "why don't you both sleep?" And see if we can't rework some math to make sure it's a win for both of us.

Don't give in to being wrong. Rather, congratulate them on what they did well and offer to rethink things together in the very near future.

If you are mentioning packet negotiation then yes.

Once you have cleared all rounds of interviews, HR will share an email with you requesting all of your documents, including offer letters from other organizations that you currently have.

So during the negotiation you may very well raise that issue.

Please note: You must have those offer letters with you or at least be able to share them within a week (grace period may vary for each organization) Post your HR discussion.

I hope this helps.

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