Why do teachers hate their jobs? My daughter is doing some research on a future teaching career and has yet to see anything positive from a teacher.

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Colt Flowers



Why do teachers hate their jobs? My daughter is doing some research on a future teaching career and has yet to see anything positive from a teacher.

Why? Let's see here:

  • Teachers are now expected to be parents, babysitters, and educators rolled into one. If your kids are in trouble ... it can't possibly be your fault. They are the teachers, not doing their job!
  • Discipline in education has worn out to the point that children know that there is little we can do when they misbehave. Put them in detention? You waste 30 to 60 minutes of your time. Not funny, but not judgmental. Call your parents? Not long ago, because parents rarely believe that their child has done something wrong. Children know that teachers have little available to do about
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Why? Let's see here:

  • Teachers are now expected to be parents, babysitters, and educators rolled into one. If your kids are in trouble ... it can't possibly be your fault. They are the teachers, not doing their job!
  • Discipline in education has worn out to the point that children know that there is little we can do when they misbehave. Put them in detention? You waste 30 to 60 minutes of your time. Not funny, but not judgmental. Call your parents? Not long ago, because parents rarely believe that their child has done something wrong. Children know that teachers have little available to do about their behavior.
  • On a related note, it is now extremely difficult to expel a student. In reality, it costs the school a lot of money, so schools are forced to spend more and more time, effort, and money trying to reform students who simply don't want to participate.
  • Job performance (and often pay) is directly related to student performance on exams and meeting target grades. Although this is to be expected, it also means that the poor results fall squarely on your shoulders. Do you know that disturbing, disconnected kid who doesn't want to work? It's your fault.
  • Class size is a balloon - realistically, the ideal classroom would be around 18-20 students. That gives you a good group of kids to work with, the ability to focus more of your time on people, and means that controlling the classroom is easier. Instead ... we have as many as 30 to 35 children crammed into a classroom like sardines. It's close, it's awkward, and children can't be made to feel like we care about them as individuals when we have so many crammed into a room.
  • Your working hours are not the same as your working hours. You may be paid 30 to 35 hours a week (with 20 to 25 hours of "contact time"), but realistically, you are more likely to put 40 to 60 hours working. Lesson planning, proofreading, 'book review', assessment preparation, participation in professional development, staff meetings, parent-teacher conferences, staff detentions… You know about those great long vacations you have? You really don't understand them. A two week break at Easter is more of a long weekend. The rest of the time, you will likely spend hours updating your grade and preparing for everything that accumulates when the term resumes.
  • Oh, on that note, you don't get paid for that vacation. People believe that (curiously), but what actually happens is that your salary during the periods you work is spread out over 12 months. You are always paid at the beginning of the month, but never during those vacation periods. And by the way, it's a forced vacation. You can't choose when you get them, and you can't choose not to have them; you're out when the kids are. It does not mean that it is not working, of course, it will be. They just don't pay you for it.
  • Pressure from mid-level and top-level leaders tends to be staggeringly high. Classroom observations tend to be frequent, disruptive, and, of course, demanding. The same is true of inspections: although you accept them as part of the job, they are major sources of stress in a job that is often already very stressful.
  • Socialization. I'll be honest with you: I hadn't thought about this until I started working at a school, but I socialize more on any given day than you do in a whole week. My school has 1700 children and more than 200 employees. The classes are around 25-30 kids, and you have five of them in one day, plus the break and lunchtime chores (the staff don't have a 40-60 minute lunch break, by the way, It's about 15 minutes, if you're lucky!). Do the math on that: at a minimum, you're going to interact with 125 kids a day. More unstructured time, more colleagues, more parents. That's exhausting in ways you wouldn't believe.
  • Responsibility. Beyond your educational well-being, you are responsible for the safety and well-being of each child in your care. Anything that happens to them physically or emotionally while they are in their classroom is in their heads.
  • Wearing a mask: You must realize that the person you see teaching you is not your real teacher. That is not the same person: it is his professional face. The caring, calm, understanding and knowledgeable person, who smiles and always looks unflappable. That is what children need from us: to be the stable adult. It does not matter that you barely slept this week, you have problems in your relationships, financial problems, you are stressed and pressured by work, you have not had time to mark those papers, you have an observation tomorrow. You may have your own kids and your partner to deal with ... You can't show any of that. That puts a lot of stress on a person and it can be a struggle to deal with.
  • The curriculum and school policies used in schools are often made by people who have never worked in education before. Your Secretary of Education? A politician who went to a private school and would not set foot in a public school unless he made an "appearance", and he better believe that that will not give him a realistic view of what is really going on. This is the craziest of things.
  • Even the best effort you put into teaching will always be "working as expected."

I'll be frank: you have to be a real idiot to want to work in teaching.

I? I'm an idiot.

There are many benefits at work. You have to understand that part, but you have to be aware of the downsides. If you are a good, dedicated and committed teacher, you will enjoy a stable career that will last as long as you. If you have passion and energy, you will find that it is reflected in the children you work with, and they will respond and succeed because of your inspiration. You will meet children in their most formative years and you can help them overcome obstacles and face problems that they could struggle with without you. You will always leave a lasting impression.

Don't fool yourself into thinking it's easy and never imagine it's an 8 to 4 job. It's not really a career or a job - it's a lifetime commitment. My advice? Don't do it until you've gotten a taste of it - be an observer, volunteer, or technical assistant for a while. Then take the step. If you jump in inexperienced, you will drown.

I have many teacher friends and many of them hate their jobs.

The number one reason or complaint I hear is a non-supportive administration that creates unnecessary stress and often harms children. It can be extremely emotionally painful for new teachers, who have little job security, to be working through a situation and seeing things an administration does that hurt students, and not feeling like they can do anything about it because if they “rock” the boat ”, will be the first person to be fired.

Most new teachers have little job security. Most public school workplaces are unionized with a

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I have many teacher friends and many of them hate their jobs.

The number one reason or complaint I hear is a non-supportive administration that creates unnecessary stress and often harms children. It can be extremely emotionally painful for new teachers, who have little job security, to be working through a situation and seeing things an administration does that hurt students, and not feeling like they can do anything about it because if they “rock” the boat ”, will be the first person to be fired.

Most new teachers have little job security. Most public school workplaces are unionized on a seniority system, which means it can be virtually impossible to fire older teachers unless they do something extremely bad, but the district can always fire as many more teachers. Youth however you want at the end of the year by simply cutting funds and eliminating positions, which means all the newer teachers are expelled. Most unionized teacher workplaces are “take your time and work your way” environments that do not reward hard work, but simply reward spending time staying on the job.

People reference salary as one of the reasons why more people don't become teachers, and this can be a factor in some cities with a very high cost of living, but in my experience, none of my teacher friends are low salary complaint. The salary of teachers in public schools is higher than in private schools and the benefit packages are usually very good. In the states where I live, the average teacher salary is about $ 57,000 and the starting salary is about $ 40,000, and that's more than enough to live comfortably.

Lastly, dysfunction can be a factor in why people don't want to teach. I have met some teachers who worked in really dysfunctional schools. One of my friends teaches at a school with a gang violence problem. One of my friends teaches at a middle school where two teachers have been fired for having sex with students. That's disgusting to me, and when multiple problems like that occur in the same school, it points to a systemic problem. In the South, a common concern is that teachers will be forced to revise their curriculum or censor their own teaching on race and sex ed issues, as right-wing legislatures pass hair-raising and authoritarian laws restricting what can be done. can teach. Many larger districts have dysfunctionality caused by high-level administrations. In some cities, there are entire buildings the size of a school where no teaching is provided, buildings that are only occupied by administrators. I have spoken with numerous professors who felt stifled by the regulations.

All of this affects newer teachers more, due to the union system and seniority.

Frankly, it disgusts me. I am the type of person who would love to be a teacher. I love teaching, I am a hard worker and people tell me that I am a very good teacher, when I have taught in the past. But I am not willing to put myself in a position where I am on the lowest rung of the latter and could be expelled due to a funding cut, especially when I clearly see older teachers getting away with incompetence (or worse. still, crazy and harmful behavior) just because they are older.

No, instead, I choose to work in the business world where, even if there are still injustices, at least I get rewarded more for my hard work.

I would gladly take a teaching job if I didn't have the same regressive social status system where it puts all the hardships on the younger and newer teachers and privileges the older ones.

Like many people, your daughter has combined two issues. Most teachers love to teach. We all hate today's teaching environment.

We love interactions with students. We love taking kids into action in class and in life. Sharing our love for our subject and learning is a joy. Teaching is an incredible opportunity. Most teachers appreciate that.

What teachers hate is that we have been demonized beyond rational belief by non-educators posing as congressmen with the public good in mind. These folks, whose pockets are full of money from for-profit school-owning corporations

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Like many people, your daughter has combined two issues. Most teachers love to teach. We all hate today's teaching environment.

We love interactions with students. We love taking kids into action in class and in life. Sharing our love for our subject and learning is a joy. Teaching is an incredible opportunity. Most teachers appreciate that.

What teachers hate is that we have been demonized beyond rational belief by non-educators posing as congressmen with the public good in mind. These folks, whose pockets are full of money from corporations that own for-profit schools as well as companies that profit from high-stakes testing, have the destruction of free public education as their undeclared goal. Our budgets are drastically reduced, our supplies are running out, good managers are getting fewer and fewer.

Are Public Schools Having Problems? Absolutely. Some of them have absolute shit for physical plants. In poverty-stricken neighborhoods, the safety of teachers and students is constantly at risk. Those schools also suffer in staffing. Nobody wants to teach in such an environment, staff turnover is constant and education suffers.

The problem is extremely complex. We know that what we tried to do in the past did not work. We also know that the flood of for-profit schools is not working either. I don't have an answer to the problems.

As for your daughter, if you are sincerely interested in a teaching career, I advise you to do so carefully. If he lands in a good situation, he will have an incredible race. Otherwise, you will be looking for a new career in 3 years. As for what makes a good situation, I will paraphrase Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart's words on pornography when he said, "I may not be able to define pornography, but I know it when I see it."

Your daughter may not be able to define a good teaching situation, but when she visits a school and interviews them, she will know if she is in one.

I have been sworn in more times than I can remember, beaten, pushed, abused and accused of favoritism, sexism and racism.

In my first lesson, a student pushed a desk and told me that I don't like students with dicks (because I wouldn't let him go to the bathroom five minutes before the bell).

I have seen chairs thrown, broken windows, painted walls, things on fire, students attacked, parents attacked, teachers attacked, and police officers attacked.

I have seen students who are depressed, confused, anxious, drugged, violent, emotionally, physically, sexually, and verbally abused.

I can honestly say

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I have been sworn in more times than I can remember, beaten, pushed, abused and accused of favoritism, sexism and racism.

In my first lesson, a student pushed a desk and told me that I don't like students with dicks (because I wouldn't let him go to the bathroom five minutes before the bell).

I have seen chairs thrown, broken windows, painted walls, things on fire, students attacked, parents attacked, teachers attacked, and police officers attacked.

I have seen students who are depressed, confused, anxious, drugged, violent, emotionally, physically, sexually, and verbally abused.

I can honestly say that if the only reason you're teaching is for money, no matter how much you get paid, it's not worth it.

The teachers I know love their work, difficult as it is, because they have the opportunity to make a difference.

They want to transform lives as much as they can.

They want to be the light, sometimes the only light, that shines in the dark for injured children.

They want to break the cycle of illiteracy, poverty and abuse; to give your students a chance to break free.

I don't hate my job. Not at all. But some days it wears me out.


I imagine that for some teachers it can be difficult to hold onto idealism after so much brokenness.

Maybe that's why they hate their jobs.

For some teachers, they may be living from paycheck to paycheck and resentment builds at the way society is underestimating their contribution.

Maybe that's why they hate their jobs.

I've seen teachers who don't really like children; they did not get the note that teaching is about children.

Maybe that's why they hate their jobs.

I have seen teachers so overwhelmed by the administration and mandates of the Department of Education that they cannot actually teach students.

Maybe that's why they hate their jobs.

There are a lot of great answers here. I'd say the top two reasons I quit teaching were: 1) Horrible student behavior / disrespect / no consequences and 2) too low pay for so much work. The first year I quit teaching, I made $ 8,000 MORE. And, not only that, I was able to have the energy to do some part-time tutoring, adding another $ 1,500 to my salary. So I made practically $ 10k more in ONE year. She was rarely ill. My quality of life was better. I had time to go on a date. My job didn't leave me crying all the time. When my boss called me it was to talk to me, not to complain

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There are a lot of great answers here. I'd say the top two reasons I quit teaching were: 1) Horrible student behavior / disrespect / no consequences and 2) too low pay for so much work. The first year I quit teaching, I made $ 8,000 MORE. And, not only that, I was able to have the energy to do some part-time tutoring, adding another $ 1,500 to my salary. So I made practically $ 10k more in ONE year. She was rarely ill. My quality of life was better. I had time to go on a date. My job didn't leave me crying all the time. When my boss called me it was to talk to me, not to complain about something I supposedly did. My nights and weekends were mine and I felt that even without summers off, I had more time to myself. On the one hand, I could take an hour for lunch every day. I never had time to take a break while teaching. Usually I graded jobs on my 25 minute lunch. There are 25 DAYS of free time right there. Oh, and on Sundays, no more spending half of my Sunday and part of Friday night qualifying. In addition to the time on the clock in school, I estimate that I spend at least ten hours a week grading and preparing. There are 45 DAYS of work right there. On Christmas holidays, I usually spent a few days catching up on work. Then there were the classes that you continually have to pay for and make time to take as a teacher. In an office job? They PAY you to train during the workday! So let's add 2 more DAYS minimum right there. That's 72 DAYS of extra work. Summers off aren't a full three months, by the way. It's like 10 weeks. That is 50 days. Spring break, 5 days. 55 days off that office workers are supposedly not getting, but guess what, I was putting in 72 DAYS of overtime. I realized this because I couldn't for the life of me figure out how the hell I had so much more time as a clerk doing 9–5 with just two weeks off. It's because teachers work unpaid overtime that amounts to more than their "summer vacation." So it really pisses me off when people try to tell me, "But you take off your summer!" yeah, well, "you have the weekends and nights off!" It's like 10 weeks. That is 50 days. Spring break, 5 days. 55 days off that office workers are supposedly not getting, but guess what, I was putting in 72 DAYS of overtime. I realized this because I couldn't for the life of me figure out how the hell I had so much more time as a clerk doing 9–5 with just two weeks off. It's because teachers work unpaid overtime that amounts to more than their "summer vacation." So it really pisses me off when people try to tell me, "But you take off your summer!" yeah, well, "you have the weekends and nights off!" It's like 10 weeks. That is 50 days. Spring break, 5 days. 55 days off that office workers are supposedly not getting, but guess what, I was putting in 72 DAYS of overtime. I realized this because I couldn't for the life of me figure out how the hell I had so much more time as a clerk doing 9–5 with just two weeks off. It's because teachers work unpaid overtime that amounts to more than their "summer vacation." So it really pisses me off when people try to tell me, "But you take off your summer!" yeah, well, "you have the weekends and nights off!" I was putting in 72 DAYS of overtime. I realized this because I couldn't for the life of me figure out how the hell I had so much more time as a clerk doing 9–5 with just two weeks off. It's because teachers work unpaid overtime that amounts to more than their "summer vacation." So it really pisses me off when people try to tell me, "But you take off your summer!" yeah, well, "you have the weekends and nights off!" I was putting in 72 DAYS of overtime. I realized this because I couldn't for the life of me figure out how the hell I had so much more time as a clerk doing 9–5 with just two weeks off. It's because teachers work unpaid overtime that amounts to more than their "summer vacation." So it really pisses me off when people try to tell me, "But you take off your summer!" yeah, well, "you have the weekends and nights off!" So it really pisses me off when people try to tell me, "But you take off your summer!" yeah, well, "you have the weekends and nights off!" So it really pisses me off when people try to tell me, "But you take off your summer!" yeah, well, "you have the weekends and nights off!"

I assume you are speaking in the US, because in other advanced countries, this is not a big problem; elsewhere, teachers are well paid, respected, valued, have smaller classrooms, longer teaching periods, and better ... well behaved students. It is not like that in the United States. Teachers are overworked, underpaid, have oversized classes in which at least 10-25% of students are disruptive and don't care about school, parents who don't care or They are also overworked and underpaid, and they ruin it for everyone else. I witnessed this myself in high school, and felt sorry for my teachers, and

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I assume you are speaking in the US, because in other advanced countries, this is not a big problem; elsewhere, teachers are well paid, respected, valued, have smaller classrooms, longer teaching periods, and better ... well behaved students. It is not like that in the United States. Teachers are overworked, underpaid, have oversized classes in which at least 10-25% of students are disruptive and don't care about school, parents who don't care or They are also overworked and underpaid, and they ruin the situation for everyone else. I witnessed this myself in high school, felt sorry for my teachers, and was annoyed by students who made learning impossible for the rest of us. We have a problem of values ​​in this country that comes mainly from our government: education is not valued, funds are not directed towards it, but are put in defense and in the army, and not in investing in our youth and our future . Again, look at other countries, Germany, France, Switzerland, even a country with such a corrupt policy as Italy, they all know better and prioritize education and invest in the education of young people. The state of education in the US is sadly very, very bleak. Teachers become teachers because they want to educate young people, but they are constantly torn apart by funding cuts, bureaucratic administration, etc. Most teachers pay money out of their own pockets to provide essential items for their classrooms that the district should provide. There is also a huge disparity between WHICH districts get funding, so East Grand Rapids, MI, a wealthy community, may have what they need, while Detroit Public Schools have nothing. As I said,

It's a little better in Canada, but only up to a point. I failed my internship in '96, but I despised teaching high school so much that I was relieved to fail. He used to give a few extra circles around the parking lot, joking in the hope that he might have an accident so he doesn't have to go inside.

The mistake I made is that I loved English, not teenage students. And I couldn't teach him much! —Because all day I was fighting with people to be quiet and pay attention when they didn't want to be there; and then complete the paperwork; and then be reprimanded by my supervising teacher for

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It's a little better in Canada, but only up to a point. I failed my internship in '96, but I despised teaching high school so much that I was relieved to fail. He used to give a few extra circles around the parking lot, joking in the hope that he might have an accident so he doesn't have to go inside.

The mistake I made is that I loved English, not teenage students. And I couldn't teach him much! —Because all day I was fighting with people to be quiet and pay attention when they didn't want to be there; and then complete the paperwork; and then be reprimanded by my supervising teacher for not meeting the x and y target and the assessment metric; and then more paperwork. I saw older teachers with this frazzled and exhausted expression after fighting for years against the public, the administration, and the students. (I found out years later that conditions were often worse in the US - at least we didn't have to worry about being physically attacked by students.) I ran far and fast, and every day I am glad I am not a teacher. When every last damn thing is a fight, it wears you out.

I'm not going to tell you that your daughter shouldn't be a teacher. But I learned this clearly, again: if you like children, be a teacher. If you like the subject, become a teacher. It is very difficult to get a teaching position, but what I do now is much more fun.

As a third option, your daughter might consider teaching ESL abroad like I did. That was easier and more fun, less bureaucracy, and in Mexico and Asia the students want to be there and they are easier to handle, and the parents support and respect the teachers. My only caveat is that ESL is not a good long-term career; maybe it's for someone who wants to teach as an experience for a few years and then do something related or different at home.

Why do teachers hate their jobs? My daughter is doing some research on a future teaching career and has yet to see anything positive from a teacher. "

Blame the tax riot as the root cause of the specific complaints listed in other answers.

Teacher salaries are by far the most important part of the public education bill. And school taxes are the majority of local taxes. (Where I live, the tax bills are separate. The school tax bill is about three times the city and county property tax bill.) This remains true, even when the school administration is bloated and inefficient. There are many more teachers than

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Why do teachers hate their jobs? My daughter is doing some research on a future teaching career and has yet to see anything positive from a teacher. "

Blame the tax riot as the root cause of the specific complaints listed in other answers.

Teacher salaries are by far the most important part of the public education bill. And school taxes are the majority of local taxes. (Where I live, the tax bills are separate. The school tax bill is about three times the city and county property tax bill.) This remains true, even when the school administration is bloated and inefficient. There are many more teachers than administrators.

The tax revolt considers that all taxes are bad and all tax money is spent on a barely tolerable evil. Local taxes do not cover all costs for local schools. State and federal contributions are subject to delays and changes, mostly decreases. And when schools have less money, they lay off teachers, increase class sizes, lay off specialists, and require all teachers to take on all specialist tasks.

Number two on the list of causes would be racism and forcible removal from schools. Support for public schools waned as the courts and the federal government suffered desegregation "stuck" in local schools.

Despite all this, there are good schools in some places. They enjoy local support. They are mostly found in affluent areas where school taxes allow for a good salary without creating resentment in taxpayers. They are mostly in 'homogeneous' areas with minimal conflict over what schools should or should not do. They have many more successful students than schools with less support. Many teachers in these schools love their work. They are managing to do exactly what they wanted to do when they decided to become a teacher.

Pretty late for the game, so I don't know if OP's daughter went on to pursue a teaching career, but in case this helps, here are my two cents as a currently active high school teacher.

To start my answer, I want to point out that I have been a teacher for 6 years, mainly of History, and that the reason I am becoming anonymous is because, unfortunately, dissent is treated quite harshly in these parts.

With that said, here is my answer.

I love teaching.

I make. I love my students, I love the interactions, the fun we have, the learning activities we do, chat about hobbies, encourage them to play.

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Pretty late for the game, so I don't know if OP's daughter went on to pursue a teaching career, but in case this helps, here are my two cents as a currently active high school teacher.

To start my answer, I want to point out that I have been a teacher for 6 years, mainly of History, and that the reason I am becoming anonymous is because, unfortunately, dissent is treated quite harshly in these parts.

With that said, here is my answer.

I love teaching.

I make. I love my students, I love the interactions, the fun we have, the learning activities we do, chatting about hobbies, encouraging them to pursue dreams, and even offering help determining which colleges to apply to to pursue those dreams, all of that.

But I have come, in the last 6 years, to hate parents and school administrators.

I absolutely hate them.

Let's start with the parents:

Arguably, many parents are fine: they are neither too present nor too absent, they listen, and many will actually try to help their children improve in school.

But like many, in my experience, they should have been spayed at puberty. Obviously, I am participating in hyperbole, but the dislike is real.

These are the parents who accuse us of not doing our job when little Johnny or Allie refused to do their homework for three weeks in a row, even when we called attention to it multiple times.

These are the ones who insist that their child is a perfect angel at home when caught at school flaunting the rules, being a bully, or when caught committing a legal infraction.

These are the ones who call your boss instead of setting up a meeting with you personally, because they think they can use personal connections or talk bad about you behind your back to get you to change a note / practice.

In the case of my field, these are the parents who demand to know why I am teaching children a version of history or political science that they do not know or with which they do not agree, indirectly accusing me of brainwashing them with ideological / political ends. .

And now administrators. Good gods, I hate administrators.

To be fair, I've had a couple of good guys in the past - these were the ones whose work made it easy for teachers to do their jobs. If we needed something, they found a way to make it possible, making our work easier. The forms and paperwork were there primarily to cover our asses and were made quick and easy to complete, and the planning was generally seen as something that should be comprehensive, not super specific, due to the inevitable surprises we faced during. the course of our work.

But that has not been the norm in my experience. They are the exception: wonderful little gems in the middle of a sea of ​​conceited fossilized excrement.

Here's the thing: if my working hours are 8 hours a day, and I spend most of that time doing some kind of administrative BS, like filling out a form in triplicate or some nonsense, instead of spending time teaching the students, so I'm less of a teacher and more of a bureaucrat with lecture privileges.

As an example: my current administrators insist that all the classes that I will teach during the next two weeks are basically planned for the second. I have to hand over these stupid, makeshift forms that someone basically stumbled upon creating in MS Word every other week, which not only says exactly what I will say in class, but also what questions I will ask students in class, when will I ask those questions. , how long it will take me to review a particular topic, and then how I will finish my class.

In case that doesn't sound too bad, I'll remind you that this is basically like programming a machine. So I am not teaching so much but regurgitating a previously planned script with no room for adaptation or individual attention unless I have already planned it in advance. This despite, I must point out, the fact that the future cannot be predicted. It leaves no room for the possibility that certain classes progress faster than others (because, as any self-respecting teacher knows, individual students and even classes learn at different rates) or certain classes that need more time per subject. When I mentioned that, by the way, they essentially told me to "force all classes to learn at the same rate."

Tall poppy syndrome at its finest, ladies and gentlemen.

Here's the thing: I recognize the need for administrators. Running a school requires a lot of paperwork, and to protect good teachers from the plague of authoritarian parents, we need a certain amount of bureaucracy.

My objection, however, is that administrators are there to help teachers, not to make their work harder. Instead of forcing us to go through 199283764 idiotic meetings that sometimes amount to little more than a cordial round of self-indulgent nonsense, focus on making planning quicker and easier. Rather than harassing us into not immediately entering our students' attendance data (which is often manual and done on an Excel sheet because our administrators have the computing prowess of a Neanderthal), why not find a way to digitize and streamline the process?

Or, in a fairly specific case related to my current school, instead of telling us how tests should be formulated up to 12th grade (requiring that all tests consist of four sections: multiple choice, true or false, fill in the blanks blank and long answer questions (yes, these administrators are that ridiculous), why not focus on more important topics, like reducing the number of classes, ensuring teachers are assigned age groups that they feel more comfortable and reduce the demands of unnecessary school work?

So yeah, those are my main reasons why I sometimes feel drained as a teacher. Parents and administrators. Sorry for the spiel and I hope everyone has a great day!

I came to teaching in my mid-forties, but my siblings, parents, and grandparents were educators, so I've seen how much education has changed and how much it has stayed the same. A retired teacher asked me if I liked the career change. I told him that while I mostly enjoyed my job, I was glad I hadn't done it since I was in my twenties. In my observation based on my limited experience, teaching no longer seems like a career choice. It seems to me that it takes five years to become competent, ten years to be confident, and 15 years to get over it. I have the feeling that after 15 years, the di

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I came to teaching in my mid-forties, but my siblings, parents, and grandparents were educators, so I've seen how much education has changed and how much it has stayed the same. A retired teacher asked me if I liked the career change. I told him that while I mostly enjoyed my job, I was glad I hadn't done it since I was in my twenties. In my observation based on my limited experience, teaching no longer seems like a career choice. It seems to me that it takes five years to become competent, ten years to be confident, and 15 years to get over it. I have a feeling that after 15 years, the lack of respect, the inability to try all the innovative things you learned in school, and the lack of a lot of control gets to you and you burn out. But there are some real rewards. It is satisfying to see students grow, mature, and progress. It's possible to get a job in a district that's not so tied to test scores, where you can really teach the kind of exciting lessons you're encouraged to think about in college. If your attention is still focused on children, you may enjoy it very much, but you may want to think about the kind of career you would like to pursue in fifteen or twenty years. As I told the retired teacher I mentioned earlier "I love children, it's the adults that give me headaches." where you can really teach the kind of exciting lessons you are encouraged to think about in college. If your attention is still focused on children, you may enjoy it very much, but you may want to think about the kind of career you would like to pursue in fifteen or twenty years. As I told the retired teacher I mentioned earlier "I love kids, it's the adults that give me headaches." where you can really teach the kind of exciting lessons you are encouraged to think about in college. If your attention is still focused on children, you may enjoy it very much, but you may want to think about the kind of career you would like to pursue in fifteen or twenty years. As I told the retired teacher I mentioned earlier "I love children, it's the adults that give me headaches."

Maybe you are not talking to the right people?

Sure there are many teachers who need to get out of the profession and there are also very few people who access it. This will lead to a HUGE teacher shortage in the next decade, but we'll talk about that later. *

Teaching is largely what you do with it. If you get easily frustrated ... walk away. If you expect a life of luxury ... stay away. If you don't like long hours with no overtime… stay away.

But I love teaching, and even though I'm retiring this year after 33 years of doing this, it's not because I don't love my job. There's n

Keep reading

Maybe you are not talking to the right people?

Sure there are many teachers who need to get out of the profession and there are also very few people who access it. This will lead to a HUGE teacher shortage in the next decade, but we'll talk about that later. *

Teaching is largely what you do with it. If you get easily frustrated ... walk away. If you expect a life of luxury ... stay away. If you don't like long hours with no overtime… stay away.

But I love teaching, and even though I'm retiring this year after 33 years of doing this, it's not because I don't love my job. There is no more rewarding career. When you see the look in a child's eyes when they finally get something, or when a child who has been failing all year finally passes a test, there is nothing better. Surely there are days that wear you out and knowing too much about the life our students lead can make you cry at home at night. For me, however, it has been a wonderful journey and I would not trade for anything else.

* Until PEOPLE (parents, government, children) start to value education and make salary and compensation commensurate with the educational level of teachers, there will be a teacher shortage. Until parents start looking at their own children first when there is a problem, there will be a teacher shortage. Until teachers don't need to have two jobs to pay for a house in the district they teach, there will be a teacher shortage. And finally, until teachers are blamed for the failures of society, there will be a teacher shortage.

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