Why do some people work minimum wage jobs?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Alexander Lee



Why do some people work minimum wage jobs?

Very few have the problem of being unskilled or unable to do jobs that pay more.

Some have a minimum wage job, because it is close to home and has flexible hours, and does not require much of them.

Others have a minimum wage job, such as a gap job while looking for the high-quality job they want.

I was reading about a guy who worked at one of the big Wall St banks during the 2008 crash. His bank went bankrupt and he ended up working at McDonald's instead of receiving unemployment compensation. Because he was such a good worker, the store manager noticed that he didn't fit in and asked him what his story was.

Keep reading

Very few have the problem of being unskilled or unable to do jobs that pay more.

Some have a minimum wage job, because it is close to home and has flexible hours, and does not require much of them.

Others have a minimum wage job, such as a gap job while looking for the high-quality job they want.

I was reading about a guy who worked at one of the big Wall St banks during the 2008 crash. His bank went bankrupt and he ended up working at McDonald's instead of receiving unemployment compensation. Because he was such a good worker, the store manager noticed that he didn't fit in and asked him what his story was. He spoke to Corporate and Corporate gave him a high paying job at headquarters.

Lastly, there are some people who just make really terrible decisions and therefore never go above the minimum wage. I knew a guy who shoplifted at the store, until he got caught, fired, and then he got another minimum wage job and robbed them. You will earn minimum wage until you die.

Similarly, we had a lady at Wendy's who was hired and told everyone that she was only working until she qualified for welfare again. Sure enough, on the date he qualified, he resigned.

She will also earn minimum wage until she dies.

I can think of a few reasons.

  • They are beginning. This is their first job and they have no experience or other qualifications. Everybody starts somewhere.
  • They can't get a better job and they need work. Even if you are overqualified, a minimum wage job may be the best you can get if you need money right now.
  • They are not rated for any better. Many jobs require training and experience that can be difficult or impossible to get without time and money. Or they require something they don't have the money or the skills to do, like driving a car or a certain wardrobe.
  • They do
Keep reading

I can think of a few reasons.

  • They are beginning. This is their first job and they have no experience or other qualifications. Everybody starts somewhere.
  • They can't get a better job and they need work. Even if you are overqualified, a minimum wage job may be the best you can get if you need money right now.
  • They are not rated for any better. Many jobs require training and experience that can be difficult or impossible to get without time and money. Or they require something they don't have the money or the skills to do, like driving a car or a certain wardrobe.
  • They don't want a more demanding job. I know it is the antithesis of the capitalist lifestyle, but some people just want to get enough money to survive. They don't need things to be happy. They just want a stress-free lifestyle that allows them to interact with others and get paid for it.

Hope it helps clarify the matter.

You can also follow me on twitter.

Because that's all they can get. It is minimal or none. Now the reason that is all you can get is many. Low skill, unavailability of the above minimum, time constraints, ambition or reason to work in the first place are all influences as to the type of work we do. Mainly, it is the low-skilled people who lack the most valuable skills who fill those positions. I could go on to talk about why even having a minimum wage is counterproductive, but that's not really the point.

Some are just small, or just left, for some I know that's all you're hiring right now, some are between jobs. Like where I work for now, in December they closed. Some of those who have been laid off were only able to find part-time jobs in fast food. There are a very small number of people who don't want a full-time job, due to all the donations from family, churches, and local charities. They work full time, the brochures stop.

I deliver cars part time. I like work. I can read my phone and take a nap on the chase bus. The crew is great; lots of stories and laughs.

It is true that the salary is minimal, but my SS, my wife's job and her SS, give us a good life. At 80, my drive and ambition have gone the way of the 🦤, so it's not that bad.

-Thomas-

They do not know the value of their effort.

Most people sell short rather than upgrade

They do not know its value.

Most companies keep an eye on expenses and keep them as low as possible

I left school illiterate at 16 and the only job they offered me was at a cotton recycling plant, collecting waste from a conveyor belt. It was dirty, it smelled bad and the factory was infested with rats. He was very poorly paid (there was no minimum wage at that time). All my life I have had similar jobs and I continue to work as a cleaner now that I am of retirement age.

It depends.

How much money do I have when I start and what are my living expenses?

If I have no money when I start and my living expenses are much higher than what I can earn at my minimum wage job, I would take the 100,000 job that I hate.

Hate is a strong word. Why do I hate this job?

If I'm not being physically abused, or something like that, I may be able to change my attitude towards work, while saving money and making plans to do something else.

The minimum wage in Massachusetts today is $ 9 per hour. $ 9 / hour is $ 18K / year.

Maybe I work the $ 100K / year job for a year, quit, take 4 years off, and then repeat the process.

T

Keep reading

It depends.

How much money do I have when I start and what are my living expenses?

If I have no money when I start and my living expenses are much higher than what I can earn at my minimum wage job, I would take the 100,000 job that I hate.

Hate is a strong word. Why do I hate this job?

If I'm not being physically abused, or something like that, I may be able to change my attitude towards work, while saving money and making plans to do something else.

The minimum wage in Massachusetts today is $ 9 per hour. $ 9 / hour is $ 18K / year.

Maybe I work the $ 100K / year job for a year, quit, take 4 years off, and then repeat the process.

The "do what you love" sounds like fun, but it only works for some people in some situations.

I may like what I do at minimum wage work, but I don't love where I have to live because of that wage, or the way that banks, landlords, and others take advantage of my financial situation.

After the 2009 crash, many low-income neighborhood owners were unable (or unwilling) to pay their mortgages. They continued to collect rent from their tenants. The banks foreclosed on the buildings and evicted the tenants, leaving them homeless.

These tenants lived from paycheck to paycheck. They did not have the 3 months rent (first, last, security) that they would need to get another apartment. Many were single mothers with children.

These real people didn't have the option to take the hypothetical 100,000-a-year job that they hate. But in the hypothetical world of the question, I'd take that job, to avoid being at the mercy of those owners.

Growing up, I had a lot of low-income friends. We are still friends. They are simply no longer low-income.

I'm not putting anyone down, nor am I saying that anyone caught in a bad situation should just stand up for themselves. I am simply counting what I saw.

The first thing my friends did was get some kind of education, or some work experience, that allowed them to get out of the bad neighborhoods. It took them years, but they did it.

They didn't think the ghetto was cool or edgy. They hated it, so they left.

Again, doing this will be more or less difficult depending on where the person starts and many other factors.

My point is that doing what you love for very little money:

1) may sound fair, but it makes sense to consider what the rest of your day will be like, after you get home from work.

2) sounds like fun to people who haven't

3) you probably ignore some options

For example, how about a $ 50K job that you like?

More to say on this topic, but we have probably already passed the TLDR. :)

TL: DR

Mixed Opinions and Feelings About Minimum Wages

From my long years of experience working minimum wage jobs early in my career to managing various businesses and / or companies that hired people on minimum wage, I have extremely mixed opinions and feelings about people who work wage jobs. minimum.

Each person is unique with very different life circumstances.

I feel bad for some people who work minimum wage jobs, but I don't feel bad for others because of the life decisions they made, their feelings of entitlement, or being their own worst enemies so they can earn more money.

No

Keep reading

TL: DR

Mixed Opinions and Feelings About Minimum Wages

From my long years of experience working minimum wage jobs early in my career to managing various businesses and / or companies that hired people on minimum wage, I have extremely mixed opinions and feelings about people who work wage jobs. minimum.

Each person is unique with very different life circumstances.

I feel bad for some people who work minimum wage jobs, but I don't feel bad for others because of the life decisions they made, their feelings of entitlement, or being their own worst enemies so they can earn more money.

No two cases are exactly alike in the minimum wage arena

There are always extenuating circumstances.

An example is that of a male relative. When he was in his freshman year of high school, his parents insisted that he take a minimum-wage job as a bag clerk at a local grocery store.

He hated working any job and was quickly fired for not showing up for his scheduled shifts.

Although his family encouraged him to go to college and offered to help him pay his way through a four-year degree program or technical school, allowing him to live rent-free at home, he flatly refused.

His answer was that he was smart enough to make a living without any training.

Ultimately, his goal after high school was, as he explained, "to relax at home, sleep late, watch TV all day, and play video games at night."

A case of tough love

After it became clear that he was refusing to go to school or work, his parents forced him to leave the family home at age 19 as a way to teach him how to sink or swim in life.

He continued to fail and was fired from almost every job he held until he somehow took a break and managed to land an unskilled labor job at a Fortune 50 corporation. Fortunately, he was hired by a boss who took him under his wing and guided him.

Eventually, he was promoted multiple times and began to earn much more than the minimum wage.

Although his boss encouraged him to go back to technical school or college to guarantee him a chance to earn more money at his job, he still refused.

He was also turned belligerent by the encouragement of his mentor and the mentor eventually stopped working with him to help him in his career.

The ego took over and wreaked havoc

After climbing the ladder to a very good salary with benefits, this same family member developed an exaggerated ego about his job skills.

He demanded a large raise that was denied as it was well above what the company was paying for the work he was doing.

When he was turned down for his massive raise demands, he became angry, developed a bad attitude, and began calling in sick on days when he desperately needed to manage his shifts.

After he was fired from the highest paying job he had ever held due to his attitude, lack of trustworthiness and commitment, he vowed that he would get a much better job in the future.

Part-time tandem work jobs

That was 20 years ago.

The best he has been able to do is find two minimum wage jobs and work together to earn enough money to pay the rent for a small apartment. She works part-time at a take-out sandwich shop and part-time at a customer service job.

You can't afford a car and you always have to have some kind of roommate to help you with your living expenses.

At 40 he has no technical or university training.

He also does not have savings, or medical insurance with credit cards to the maximum. His resume is a train accident with countless terminations due to his inability to report to work when necessary.

Due to his own life decisions, he still earns minimum wage and picks up any extra work (car parking at wedding receptions) for cash when he can find them and is willing to put in the effort to get the job done.

Feeling sorry for someone who has made bad decisions in life

I fell pity for him?

In general I feel very sad for him and how he has lived his life, but I do not regret that he is only paid minimum wage.

Your limited skill set, work experience, poor attitude, and levels of reliability justify nothing more.

The first job I had when I was just old enough to hold a rake and be able to work part-time on the lawn for neighbors was well below minimum wage. I was happy that I could earn some money.

I have a hard time being sympathetic to people who feel like they don't have to work for a living. Sometimes it is difficult for me to understand that way of thinking.

My own minimum wage trip

I also worked for minimum wage in a German bakery when I was 15 years old and in a hospital when I turned 16. I paid my own expenses for 4 years of university and 4 years of graduate studies.

During my first marriage when I was not yet 21, my husband and I struggled to pay for food and share an old beater car.

I often worried that our utilities would be cut off or that we would have enough money to pay for gas for our broken down car.

In today's world of 2020, when I hire people I always pay them well. I honestly can't justify paying someone to mow my lawn $ 75 / hour when I can still mow it myself or hire someone for $ 25 / hour. But I always pay well above the current rate because I try to help hard working people.

I don't believe in paying only minimum wage, but there has to be some reasonable link between what you pay someone and the value of the service they provide.

A job, in my humble opinion, should pay according to the requirements of the job and with the person based on their experience and the quality of their work.

The case of homeless women who earn minimum wage in the graphic business

I recently paid a 38 year old woman who worked for me in my real estate business $ 40 / hour to handle simple business assistance tasks. I originally hired her part-time to help supplement her hourly minimum wage as a graphic artist assistant.

She and her dog were virtually homeless and was recommended to me by a trusted friend who was trying to help this woman find additional work to get her off the streets.

After working part-time for me, in addition to her full-time job, for six months, she managed to save enough money to get an apartment with a roommate.

Once she got out of her immediate financial hole, she started calling in sick regularly.

After escaping homelessness, there was a change in attitude about work

Although she enthusiastically volunteered to work nights and weekends to stagger her work schedule with her full-time minimum wage job, she began to decline any work hours.

Regardless of the work hours he offered her, she refused to work in the evenings. From that moment on, she refused to work on Sundays so that she could spend the day with her boyfriend.

Finally, I was only available to work 4 hours a week on Saturday afternoons.

Even with her limited availability just for Saturday afternoons, she still reported sick or didn't even show up for work. Or she could cancel her work schedule in advance because of plans she had with her boyfriend, who took precedence over all her work commitments.

After I completely stopped offering her assignments and hired someone else, she seemed surprised that I didn't have any work projects for her.

Getting fired and homeless again

The last I heard, she was fired from her full-time job due to COVID-19 and was once again evicted from her apartment. Although she contacted me looking for work projects, I decided not to hire her again.

I feel sorry for her? Yes and no.

I feel bad because she has gone back to living on the streets with her dog and no boyfriend, but if she had continued working for me during the time available to her, I would probably be in a different situation.

Truth be told, I would have felt bad for her and gave her more hours or referred her to my friends or even allowed her to stay with me temporarily instead of being out on the streets.

My feelings are based solely on my own opinions and thoughts

Not everyone will agree with me or my feelings about the minimum wage. I think it is an extremely complicated situation from every angle you look at.

There are some people who get trapped in minimum wage positions, not necessarily because of the life decisions they made, but because of the circumstances of their birth, family, environment or other unfortunate situations such as health conditions or inherited debts that happen to them. persons.

In fact, there are many minimum wage workers who work very hard, are honest and loyal to their employers, and do the best they can for themselves and their families.

When I see someone who has been victimized for any reason and is stuck in horrible minimum wage jobs, I feel bad for him, especially if he is working multiple jobs and trying to take care of children or other family members.

The life is a trip

However, each case is unique, each set of circumstances is different, and some people, like the two people I mentioned above, are victims of their own poor life decisions.

I respect everyone's right to have their own opinions and to live their life as they choose to live it, even if it results in financial hardship or hardship.

And yes, sometimes (most of the time) I still feel really bad for people who are struggling or dealing with difficult life challenges. I've had a few of those myself over the years and understand firsthand how life can test us all at times.

My best wishes to all.

I currently work minimum wage at a museum in downtown Boston.
There are no health benefits (no one accepts the offer because it is too high), but I can enter other museums in New England for free or at a very low cost.

The job I had before was in a new liquor store with a horrible owner - he has no retail experience, but was constantly meddling with how to run the store (the manager ran a liquor store for 30 years and I worked in retail) . since he was 14), ignoring most of our ideas (well he officially forgot about that), cutting hours after he voluntarily (I didn't ask) he raised the time

Keep reading

I currently work minimum wage at a museum in downtown Boston.
There are no health benefits (no one accepts the offer because it is too high), but I can enter other museums in New England for free or at a very low cost.

The job I had before was in a new liquor store with a horrible owner - he has no retail experience, but was constantly meddling with how to run the store (the manager ran a liquor store for 30 years and I worked in retail) . since I was 14), ignoring most of our ideas (well, officially forgot about that), cutting hours after I voluntarily (didn't ask for it) increased the hourly wage (after 2 raises, I earned 15% less that when I started)….

Before that (in Belgium) I worked as a transport planner for a transport company. Done well above minimum wage, real health care and insurance included (because, you know: Europe). The main problem was that we had to deal with unrealistic demands from our (by far) largest domestic shipping customer: "How are you going to solve this?" they asked when their people were late to load the trucks. Good colleagues, but my supervisor just got promoted to that position and he didn't get relegation training for that. So many of the things I would ask him would be ignored.
If I didn't move to the United States, I would have quit that job a few months earlier.

And for my first job, I was a co-owner of the startup, so it's not fair to compare that to everyone else.

Being paid minimum wage didn't make me feel like a slave, but the other 2 jobs did.
Why: Disrespect (in the case of the liquor store even after literally telling the owner “if you do this, it makes me feel like they don't respect me”).
You know what's great about (most) minimum wage jobs? ZERO LIABILITY. And if you work for a larger organization (say a statewide grocery chain), you can show your talents in a certain area and you may get promoted.

For me, it's about the balance between what you get paid and what you are expected to do in a job.

Larry Boyer's answer is spot on.

When I was working at McDonald's when I was in high school, my shift boss had a 4-year degree in Architecture. She could have been making nearly $ 90,000 a year, and this was in the late 1990s.

When I heard about this, I looked at her as if she were an alien or a runaway mental patient, and asked her, "Why ... are you ... here?"

Well ... he liked the flexibility and wanted to spend more time with his children.

So she was a runaway psychiatric patient, who spent 4 years, and who knows how much money, or student loans, to get a high-level Bachelor's degree in Architecture, to end up being

Keep reading

Larry Boyer's answer is spot on.

When I was working at McDonald's when I was in high school, my shift boss had a 4-year degree in Architecture. She could have been making nearly $ 90,000 a year, and this was in the late 1990s.

When I heard about this, I looked at her as if she were an alien or a runaway mental patient, and asked her, "Why ... are you ... here?"

Well ... he liked the flexibility and wanted to spend more time with his children.

So she was a runaway psychiatric patient, who spent 4 years, and who knows how much money, or student loans, to get a high-level degree in Architecture, to end up being a shift manager at a fast food joint, to hand out refunds. for burnt fries and completing work shift schedules?

And I've seen it repeatedly. I worked in a place where people were paid to fix the boxes of the products. One of the guys there, sitting on a workbench, screwing suitcases for a low salary, had a 4-year degree as an electrical engineer. Again, I looked at him, as if he had just fallen from a flying saucer. Why are you here?

Well, pay my bills and I'm fine working here. Another runaway mental patient who spent 4 years learning to be an electrical engineer, so he could sit on a dirty bench, screw things up, and go to lunch to the sound of a bell, only to go back to the next bell. and sit screwing boxes like a human robot. Instead of making $ 50,000 to $ 75,000 as an engineer, you earn $ 20,000 as a screwdriver.

Seriously?

See, this is why conservatives like me don't like the idea of ​​a free college and university education. Why should I pay taxes to pay for the free education of idiots like this, who get a degree and end up making burgers and doing menial jobs anyway, which they would qualify for without any education?

Why should I pay for that stupidity?

Now there are people who are just terrible workers, and all they qualify for are shit jobs.

Some people are retirees or spouses of people who have good jobs, and they are doing these jobs just to spend extra money, and / or just to get out of the house and have something slightly productive to do.

And others are people who are there only in passing. High school or college students doing this type of work until they qualify for something better.

But there are a ridiculous number of people, who just feel comfortable where they are, and they are perfectly fine earning a low salary, in a lousy job.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.