Why do recruiters assume that the job they have is an "opportunity" for a software developer, forgetting about the cost of moving, leaving their current job, and starting from scratch?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Julio Mathis



Why do recruiters assume that the job they have is an "opportunity" for a software developer, forgetting about the cost of moving, leaving their current job, and starting from scratch?

They do not do it.

It's a BS expression to make it sound better. Like saying high quality instead of expensive or interesting challenges and opportunity to grow instead of difficult problems and little tools to face them. I can assure you (with a 99.75% probability) that if a position is a real opportunity, no one needs to pay a stupid recruiter to search for candidates.

Look in the store. If a television is really advantageously priced, it will sell. Quickly. No ads, no commercials, no rush. Everything that requires publicity, convincing and persuasion has never been, is not and will not be for your advant.

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They do not do it.

It's a BS expression to make it sound better. Like saying high quality instead of expensive or interesting challenges and opportunity to grow instead of difficult problems and little tools to face them. I can assure you (with a 99.75% probability) that if a position is a real opportunity, no one needs to pay a stupid recruiter to search for candidates.

Look in the store. If a television is really advantageously priced, it will sell. Quickly. No ads, no commercials, no rush. Anything that requires publicity, convincing and persuasion has never been, is not and will not be to your advantage.

Or, to be more moderate, it's an opportunity, okay. An opportunity for the recruiter to earn money with their back. It is true that I am predisposed to be on the other end of humanity. However, the only difference between those individuals and telemarketing is that a mistake in finding the "opportunity" will cost you a lot more than buying a cheap, functional, new and improved piece of whatever junk they are trying to push.

spiel completed

It appears you had a negative experience with a recruiter who forgot or neglected to inform you of what it would take to get a job, given that you may not reside where the job is located.

The instant answer to your "opportunity" question is "yes!" As for the other concerns:

First, while the vast majority of recruiters will always tell you what steps need to be taken (including important items like relocation and prospects for relocation reimbursement), yours would seem to be one of the occasional omissions of information. Experienced recruiters are not the k

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It appears you had a negative experience with a recruiter who forgot or neglected to inform you of what it would take to get a job, given that you may not reside where the job is located.

The instant answer to your "opportunity" question is "yes!" As for the other concerns:

First, while the vast majority of recruiters will always tell you what steps need to be taken (including important items like relocation and prospects for relocation reimbursement), yours would seem to be one of the occasional omissions of information. Seasoned recruiters are not the type to make such blatant omissions. They would know if relocation costs are covered or not. And indeed, the presence or absence of any cost of moving to a different location for employment purposes would be a major factor in attracting or deterring potential applicants. In any case, my advice is to make sure you always "do your research"

Regarding your second concern ... alas, from a practical point of view, there is very little any recruiter can do for you if the recruiter (or any employer) does not assume (and if you do not accept the fact) that you will have You have to leave your current job in order to accept a new job.

There should be no surprises for an applicant when it comes to knowing whether the job they are applying for is an entry-level, regular-level, or higher-level position. Whether or not a recruiter tells you, it is the applicant's (SU) responsibility to determine whether the job you are applying for is a “fresh start” situation or not. And it's not unreasonable to ask a recruiter whether or not they are. After all, why would you take a job before you FULLY discover what the job entails and requires of you?

While it certainly appears that this is a case where the recruiter has made a mistake of omission in telling you whether or not the prospective employer pays for relocation costs, it is equally apparent that he also appears to have omitted asking questions before agreeing to take an exam. . job. Ultimately, the job seeker is fully responsible for ensuring that all questions they may have about a job are answered to their satisfaction.

The beauty of recruiters is that they find jobs, "opportunities" for you to listen to. You don't owe them anything, nor do you have to take the job. Never let them tell you otherwise.

I have worked with many recruiters and consider some of them friends. Throughout my career, they have helped me find some opportunities that really worked well. Some not so great, but it's something you need to find out. You still need to do your due diligence on the potential company and team.

And you never have to accept an offer if you don't feel good about it. The more you share with a recruiter in

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The beauty of recruiters is that they find jobs, "opportunities" for you to listen to. You don't owe them anything, nor do you have to take the job. Never let them tell you otherwise.

I have worked with many recruiters and consider some of them friends. Throughout my career, they have helped me find some opportunities that really worked well. Some not so great, but it's something you need to find out. You still need to do your due diligence on the potential company and team.

And you never have to accept an offer if you don't feel good about it. The more you share with a recruiter about what you are looking for, the more likely they will not direct you to opportunities that you will reject.

This is also for its reputation. Companies pay them to find people, but if a recruiter always comes up with bad candidates, they may stop working with them. So while it might happen occasionally, they would rather find someone who fits the role of vice simply by throwing anything at a customer.

The only thing that bothers me is when they want to meet you before showing you the job description. I understand that they want to see who they are putting in front of their candidates, but it may be something out of the ordinary for you. In general, I ask them for the JD first and if I like the opportunity, I am happy to meet them before they send my resume. Fortunately, that's a one-time thing.

Good luck and I would suggest considering them as your helper, but you need to know how to work with them.

opportunity - noun

  1. an opportunity to do something, or a situation where it is easy for you to do something
  2. a job that is available

Recruiters don't "assume" that an available job is an opportunity. It is, by definition, an opportunity.

And even if it weren't in the dictionary as a definition, keep in mind that recruiters are in the business of selling jobs. They don't get paid if someone doesn't take the job. They want it to sound as attractive as possible. Calling a job "an opportunity" connotes the possibility of a positive and exciting new beginning.

Recruiters aside, opp

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opportunity - noun

  1. an opportunity to do something, or a situation where it is easy for you to do something
  2. a job that is available

Recruiters don't "assume" that an available job is an opportunity. It is, by definition, an opportunity.

And even if it weren't in the dictionary as a definition, keep in mind that recruiters are in the business of selling jobs. They don't get paid if someone doesn't take the job. They want it to sound as attractive as possible. Calling a job "an opportunity" connotes the possibility of a positive and exciting new beginning.

Recruiters aside, opportunities are rarely risk-free. To take advantage of any opportunity, you will probably have to pay something (for example, moving costs) or give up something (for example, your current job) or both. This does not prevent it from being an opportunity. It simply means that the opportunity has a downside. And if the downside exceeds the upside potential, then it may be an opportunity that you might decide not to take advantage of.

Q: "Why do recruiters assume that the job they have is an 'opportunity' for a software developer, forgetting about the cost of moving, leaving their current job, and starting from scratch?"

Recruiters don't take on much. Every "opportunity" for them is an "opportunity" for you (the candidate or contact).

Recruiters are not paid to look at the financial consequences or secondary considerations like whether or not you have friends or connections where they ask you to move, the cost of the move. They are just happy to see someone who is open to relocation. Notice: If it doesn't say it's open for relocation, the

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Q: "Why do recruiters assume that the job they have is an 'opportunity' for a software developer, forgetting about the cost of moving, leaving their current job, and starting from scratch?"

Recruiters don't take on much. Every "opportunity" for them is an "opportunity" for you (the candidate or contact).

Recruiters are not paid to look at the financial consequences or secondary considerations like whether or not you have friends or connections where they ask you to move, the cost of the move. They are just happy to see someone who is open to relocation. Note: If you don't say you are open for relocation, the only time you are contacted is whether relocation expenses are covered in whole or in part. (And the latter is rare).

I often compare "recruiters" to car salesmen, simply because they really are that dumb. They only care about making a sale. They will gladly make nice statements and spin things (often unknown) to make them sound good. They don't really care about your experience when taking a job (or after buying a car, after drinking whatever soda they're selling today).

And here's an interesting observation to prove my point: No long-term "professional" recruiter has come along and tried to beat around the bush or question my observations about not being better than the (humble) car salesmen.

You could make a number of other observations (for example, how recruiters completely fail to follow up and follow up, despite asking for and looking for quality candidates who are trustworthy). But making other observations only makes the point clear, puts a nail in the coffin that the business of "recruiting" is not about finding the right people, but about finding the right pieces of salable meat. (How recruiters treat most candidates: like pieces of meat, to be slaughtered, then minced, etc. Until the candidates become wise and stop interacting with the butchers).

Well, you are looking for a new position for a reason and the one you find will most likely offer you a greater opportunity to increase your knowledge in the specific field and a better chance of earning much more in the future. So, your intentions were to leave your current position, so leaving is not something you should consider in this change. You already have some knowledge of the specific vocation, so you are not starting from scratch, but now you have the opportunity to increase this knowledge while increasing your value to society. So, you are not starting from scratch! About

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Well, you are looking for a new position for a reason and the one you find will most likely offer you a greater opportunity to increase your knowledge in the specific field and a better chance of earning much more in the future. So, your intentions were to leave your current position, so leaving is not something you should consider in this change. You already have some knowledge of the specific vocation, so you are not starting from scratch, but now you have the opportunity to increase this knowledge while increasing your value to society. So, you are not starting from scratch! Regarding the cost of the move, you will have this in any decision that you decide to make a change in your current location. The good thing about this situation is that you have found a place that offers you a raise in salary with the possibility of getting maybe even more in the future, so you are indirectly helping to pay for your moving expenses. Sounds like a great win-win situation!

Often times, companies pay for that move, and starting from scratch can be a new way of looking at and doing things, which is an opportunity in itself.

Look, I get it. I get over a hundred emails from recruiters a month.

But they are not malicious, not just for money, they don't blow smoke, not all of them anyway. If I am a recruiter, and I really love my company, and I really believe that the engineering team is ultra talented compared to what I have seen, then yes, why not think of it as an opportunity?

Also, for anyone to give me an answer, the fact that they are open to leaving their c

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Often times, companies pay for that move, and starting from scratch can be a new way of looking at and doing things, which is an opportunity in itself.

Look, I get it. I get over a hundred emails from recruiters a month.

But they are not malicious, not just for money, they don't blow smoke, not all of them anyway. If I am a recruiter, and I really love my company, and I really believe that the engineering team is ultra talented compared to what I have seen, then yes, why not think of it as an opportunity?

Also, for anyone who would receive a response, the fact that they are open to leaving their current position would imply a certain level of discontent, or at the very least, a willingness to leave for something better. If you think that could be the recruiter's opportunity, then that's exactly what it is.

A2A

Recruiters have a job to do, like everyone else. Your job is to put cigarette butts on the seats. Often, like car salesmen, they are paid by the butt on the seat. Therefore, they are highly motivated to use flowery language to "seduce" potential applicants.

Recruiters are simply middleware; they facilitate the connection of companies with employees. For many people, a new job is a new opportunity.

Simply based on the Quora questions I receive, there are a lot of people who don't know how to get or change jobs, or are unhappy with their current position but don't know what to do.

In these cases, recruiters

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A2A

Recruiters have a job to do, like everyone else. Your job is to put cigarette butts on the seats. Often, like car salesmen, they are paid by the butt on the seat. Therefore, they are highly motivated to use flowery language to "seduce" potential applicants.

Recruiters are simply middleware; they facilitate the connection of companies with employees. For many people, a new job is a new opportunity.

Simply based on the Quora questions I receive, there are a lot of people who don't know how to get or change jobs, or are unhappy with their current position but don't know what to do.

In these cases, recruiters can be a life saver as they provide a service for free: informing a potential candidate about an actual job opening instead of the candidate having to mine job boards to see what they can find.

My first job outside of the Navy came from LinkedIn job openings. The next job came from a personal contact. My current job came from someone who contacted me on LinkedIn.

Other than the last six months in the military, I have not had to go to the job boards to find work. I know I could easily go to LinkedIn and have a half dozen opportunities in one day, more if I was willing to move to the DC area.

In short, recruiters have gaps to fill and are looking for people who are willing to do the job. Some people can / will move, others cannot.

You must remember that a recruiter is just a middle man. Your actual customer (who pays the recruiter) is the company that needs a new hire. You, the developer, are just the product that the recruiter sells.

Plus, only a certain recruiter will almost certainly place you once, but your client company will commonly come back with additional jobs they need to fill. Recruiters depend on the recurring business of their real clients to stay in business.

So of course (most) recruiters will only mention the perks of the new job they want you to take. They do not understand

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You must remember that a recruiter is just a middle man. Your actual customer (who pays the recruiter) is the company that needs a new hire. You, the developer, are just the product that the recruiter sells.

Plus, only a certain recruiter will almost certainly place you once, but your client company will commonly come back with additional jobs they need to fill. Recruiters depend on the recurring business of their real clients to stay in business.

So of course (most) recruiters will only mention the perks of the new job they want you to take. They don't get paid unless you accept the new job.

The economic realities of hiring are that simple.

A2A: "Why do recruiters assume that the job they have is an 'opportunity' for a software developer, forgetting about the cost of moving, leaving their current job, and starting from scratch?"

Well then maybe it's not an opportunity for you. Maybe it IS an opportunity for someone else. Someone who wouldn't have to move, maybe? Someone who is not currently employed? And maybe the job doesn't require candidates to "start from scratch." Perhaps it would actually be a step forward in the career of other candidates. Ultimately, it may not be an opportunity for you, but there are other people in the world who might consider it as one. Everything is subjective.

This is one of those questions with an answer so obvious that it is hard to believe that it is sincere.

The job of a recruiter is to place people in companies. They go out of their way to present the person in a good light so that the company hires them, and they do their best to present the opportunity in a good light so that they accept the offer.

If the company doesn't hire the person, they don't pay him.

If the person does not accept the job, they are not paid.

They are sellers. Specialized vendors yes, but vendors nonetheless. And sellers sell. It is what they do.

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