Why do job interviews make people so nervous despite how smart and capable they are?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Gracie Powell



Why do job interviews make people so nervous despite how smart and capable they are?

They do not do it. If you are nervous, it is up to you as the interviewee. Personally, I have never been nervous in an interview of more than 40 years of work, which included many interviews ... change of signatures, promotion panels, etc.

Never say never ... there are probably some exceptions ... but in general, interviews are intended to make an informed hiring decision, not to make you or anyone else "nervous."

As noted in other answers, the interview is a skill worth practicing. From time to time I would attend job interviews with no intention of accepting the job, just to keep my skills sharp. Be competent and capable

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They do not do it. If you are nervous, it is up to you as the interviewee. Personally, I have never been nervous in an interview of more than 40 years of work, which included many interviews ... change of signatures, promotion panels, etc.

Never say never ... there are probably some exceptions ... but in general, interviews are intended to make an informed hiring decision, not to make you or anyone else "nervous."

As noted in other answers, the interview is a skill worth practicing. From time to time I would attend job interviews with no intention of accepting the job, just to keep my skills sharp. Being competent and capable of interviewing goes a long way toward confidence.

Lastly, don't bring "your life" to the interview. It's a time to be in the moment, not "what if" about getting / not getting the job. If you're nervous, it's probably because you're eager to win a paycheck (understandable), but that is of no benefit at the moment.

2 reasons ...

Interviewing for a job is a skill

Like everything, interviewing is a skill. You have to practice it to be good at it.

Most likely some of the nerves come from trying this skill that they don't get a chance to practice very often.

Also, I recognize that you may be able to "practice the interview", but let's face it here ... the real thing is always very different from your practices ...

We are often not judged concretely

One thing that weighs heavily on every human being is whether they are valuable or not.

When we see things externally that validate or invalidate how valuable we think

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2 reasons ...

Interviewing for a job is a skill

Like everything, interviewing is a skill. You have to practice it to be good at it.

Most likely some of the nerves come from trying this skill that they don't get a chance to practice very often.

Also, I recognize that you may be able to "practice the interview", but let's face it here ... the real thing is always very different from your practices ...

We are often not judged concretely

One thing that weighs heavily on every human being is whether they are valuable or not.

When we see things externally that validate or invalidate how valuable we think we are, it can really affect us.

A job interview is an extremely concrete way of evaluating our worth because the result is binary.

Either we get the job or we don't.

And if we don't get the job, then we are forced to deal with our flaws, because we fundamentally understand that if we didn't get the job, then there must be something wrong with us.

Now ... sometimes that's true and sometimes it's not, but ...

If you live your life in such a way that you always act like you

You can always grow, because you can recognize your flaws.

I get nervous when some dumb idiots from HR start asking stupid questions that have nothing to do with the job, or allow / ask you to explain how you could do the job, or how your prior skills and knowledge could / They could help you in the position you are applying for.

I hate irrelevant questions because I can't think fast enough to give a reasonable answer as I don't understand what they're after, even if I ask them to rephrase or explain it better. Ask a direct / direct question, I will give a direct / direct answer. But I can't read between the lines or understand the concepts (or the reasoning

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I get nervous when some dumb idiots from HR start asking stupid questions that have nothing to do with the job, or allow / ask you to explain how you could do the job, or how your prior skills and knowledge could / They could help you in the position you are applying for.

I hate irrelevant questions because I can't think fast enough to give a reasonable answer as I don't understand what they're after, even if I ask them to rephrase or explain it better. Ask a direct / direct question, I will give a direct / direct answer. But I can't read between the lines or understand the concepts (or reasoning) of some hypothetical trashy mystical question.

Mind you, in Australia these days, many recruitment companies are also great at using group sessions and psychometric tests to make their decisions. I can easily pass psychometric tests with flying colors (because they are logical), but group hypothetical and / or nonsensical scenarios are the wells and an absolute BS way of choosing candidates for a job (because they are illogical). All group pantomime sessions do is give HR nuts the tools to weed out the unwanted by using some silly excuse as to why you weren't right.

For Australian recruiters, it's about time they got back to interview basics and ditched all the psycho group hugging nonsense and nonsense they are currently in love with.

Are you serious? A 45-minute interview, or up to half a dozen 45-minute interviews, determines whether or not someone will pay you enough to buy a couple of new cars each year. Being unemployed means food insecurity, housing insecurity, health insecurity. Being employed means wealth and material goods. For most people, it is the most important 45 minutes of their life.

I suppose it is because you, the interviewee, never know how you will be perceived. Interviewers may not see you the way you want them to see you. One or more of your traits that you didn't even think about: the tone or cadence of your voice, your posture (too confident? Too hesitant?) ... any number of things can go against you. It could be completely irrational factors like their appearance or place of origin that remind them of a previous employer that did not perform well. You refuse to order any XYZ food category at lunch or dinner, for example, you reveal that you are vegan in a place where I

Keep reading

I suppose it is because you, the interviewee, never know how you will be perceived. Interviewers may not see you the way you want them to see you. One or more of your traits that you didn't even think about: the tone or cadence of your voice, your posture (too confident? Too hesitant?) ... any number of things can go against you. It could be completely irrational factors like their appearance or place of origin that remind them of a previous employer that did not perform well. If you refuse to order some XYZ food category at lunch or dinner, for example, if you reveal that you are vegan in a place where meat is a big problem, it could indicate that you will not fit into the general “culture” of the place.

No matter how smart or capable you are, there is probably someone out there who is even smarter or more capable than you. And the company doesn't just hire capable people, it only hires the best. If there is only one vacancy and the company interviews 5 trained people, only one of them will get the position.

Interviews also make people nervous because interviews are important. Your future career and your ability to earn a living depend on the outcome of that interview. Without work, you cannot earn a salary and without salary, you cannot live.

Because being good at interviews is not the same as being good at your job. (Unless part of your job is doing interviews, but it's a very small group.)

This is extremely common in my world. Technicians tend to be introverts. There are developers who are good at interviewing, but many (most?) Suck. And they know it. So they are correctly nervous for an interview.

The key is to get them to speak technically. They are now in their element and you learn a lot about their capabilities. All that little talk designed to get people to relax? It does the opposite with many technicians.

Because the stakes are high. A yes or no result. A result that you really want to be yes.

Also, because you know that the decision is not in your hands. You may know very little about your interviewer and what seemingly inconsequential things could hurt your chances. That kind of uncertainty makes a lot of people nervous.

Nervousness is a manifestation of wanting something without being sure of getting it.

Job interviews are stressful because you rarely get a second chance to correct poor performance. Also, performance under pressure is not necessarily correlated with intelligence or skills.

So if a smart person who doesn't do well under pressure knows they only have one chance, they will naturally get nervous.

Because having to do 'a job' despite being smart and capable is depressing. Your subconscious knows this ... we just fool ourselves year after year.

Like Dunning Kruger, most real intellects do not believe they are intellects, so they have not mastered the control of their mind's emotions, no matter how false they are.

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