Why do doctors recommend not being a doctor?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Joel Wood



Why do doctors recommend not being a doctor?

Why do doctors recommend not being a doctor? I know very few who would, and it certainly wouldn't discourage anyone who has a real interest in a career in medicine. However, they must be realistic about the changing atmosphere of medicine. First of all, we are in an age of increasing specialization. Family practice (the modern equivalent of general practice) is a specialty unto itself, and we are constantly adding new categories, such as emergency medicine and hospitalist. The existing specialties are fu ...

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I have the luxury of speaking outside the scope of the profession. Here it goes, read on if you want the hard truth (this one is for your medical students):

  1. It is a lot of work. When preparing for medical school, you must do well on the MCAT. That takes time and money. So you have to spend a decent amount of $$ to apply to medical school, although you are not guaranteed to get in. Once you're in, you don't just have to study all the material you have to accumulate. and condensed in your brain unlike any academic experience you've experienced before, but you even have to study for board exams, which
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I have the luxury of speaking outside the scope of the profession. Here it goes, read on if you want the hard truth (this one is for your medical students):

  1. It is a lot of work. When preparing for medical school, you must do well on the MCAT. That takes time and money. So you have to spend a decent amount of $$ to apply to medical school, although you are not guaranteed to get in. Once you're in, you don't just have to study all the material you have to accumulate. and condense in your brain unlike any academic experience you've ever experienced before, but you even have to study for board exams, which some schools do a terrible job, so you'll have to spend even more time and money, outside from the crazy schedule you already have in place, to get a competitive score.
  2. It is a misunderstood field. People immediately imagine Grey's Anatomy or House. The media don't do the profession justice.
  3. Linked to n. 2, it is an underappreciated field because it is not understood.
  4. He sacrifices much of his health just to be in medical school, studying non-stop, and much less family time. Unfortunately, some people have to force themselves to miss family events, including funerals for close family members.
  5. You are going to deal with a lot of people who were fed with a silver spoon. That may or may not bother you. On top of that, there will be partners to sabotage your success.
  6. The stress is intense. 1 in 3 medical students experiences depression (usually hides it and hides it from everyone). 1 in 9 has suicidal ideation. That stress begins at the beginning of medical school, increasing over time in the later years of medical school, residency, and medical practice. Why? Because doctors are seen as income generating machines. Doctors are told to pump the medication, not to see patients for more than 15 minutes, all without sleep and depressed. The third leading cause of death in the United States, behind heart disease and cancer, is medical errors. And who is to blame? Not the system itself, but the doctors who sacrificed so much to be where they are, who are sleep deprived, stressed, with PTSD,
    1. Edit 1: For those of you curious, here is a documentary on the crisis the profession is grappling with with someone from medical school who shared with me (highly recommend): Do No Harm
    2. Edit 2: I had originally written that 1 in 3 medical students would commit suicide. That is wrong.
  7. You realize that medical care is not what you thought it would be. By the time you realize that, you are too in debt to step into another career, so you will probably move on.
  8. People assume you know everything. "Oh, didn't you know that? Are you not a doctor? Shut up, nobody knows everything. That is simply disrespectful.
  9. Too many people go to medical school, but not enough residency positions are available. You might get stuck for a while just to get matched up if you're not competitive enough.
  10. Unfortunately, the field of medicine is considered an industry, ridiculous at best, in which basic and simple finance and economics baffle those with a good understanding of those subjects, led by an administration with people who have an MBA behind their backs. names, instead of DO, or MARYLAND. The healthcare industry is one of the sickest, if not the sickest, out there.
    1. Company A has just reduced the price of drug X by 60% to increase its market share. Expecting to see an increase in demand, your demand falls completely ... what ... how ???
      1. It turns out that since the drug fell below a threshold eligible for a government subsidy, the insurance company no longer covers the drug ... because it became more expensive for the insurance company to cover the drug ... despite that the price of the drug dropped ... hmm (scratches his head).

Enough of negativity.

At the end of the day, it all comes down to caring for the patient.

If you love helping people, despite the nuances of a broken healthcare system (COVID-19 is an unfortunate example that doctors and residents will remember for the rest of their lives), despite the enormous burden of debt , the sacrifices and the nonsense, one has to go. As I mentioned earlier, then you're probably left wondering, "What else do I see myself doing?"

If your answer is resounding silence, dig deeper. Really try to understand that becoming and being a doctor IS a sacrifice, one that will go unnoticed. If you are okay with giving up your life to serve humanity, then this is the field for you.

Many reasons!

Your experience will be different in the country where you live. It is even worse in the developing world.

  1. Just getting into medical school is exhausting. If you live in a country that allows you to go from high school to college, then you need excellent perfect A's to get in. The problem is, there are thousands of other kids who get excellent grades. So this puts extra pressure on you to stand out. Essays, interviews, extracurriculars
  2. Some unis allow you to start medical school directly. Others require a bachelor's degree first or a pre-medical. It's 3 extra years of uni at least!
  3. Medical school is
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Many reasons!

Your experience will be different in the country where you live. It is even worse in the developing world.

  1. Just getting into medical school is exhausting. If you live in a country that allows you to go from high school to college, then you need excellent perfect A's to get in. The problem is, there are thousands of other kids who get excellent grades. So this puts extra pressure on you to stand out. Essays, interviews, extracurriculars
  2. Some unis allow you to start medical school directly. Others require a bachelor's degree first or a pre-medical. It's 3 extra years of uni at least!
  3. Medical school is terrible. Some can't make the grades so they go to expensive schools abroad. Tuition is insane. You are lucky if you live in a nation where tuition is free. But others like the US, unless you are super rich, you will end up in debt.
  4. Medical school itself is exhausting. Countless hours of study and depression. While other children are partying and enjoying their youth, the medical students are at home preparing for the next exam. Just to enter a new course and learn new material. You are humiliated and harassed by teachers and professors. You are going to fail at least one exam. Your final exam is extremely difficult and the osce is so scary that it can cause PTSD.
  5. So you are an intern. Which means that you are just a high class slave. All staff harass and mistreat you. You are a punching bag.
  6. So you are a doctor, resident or registrar. Etc. He is harassed, abused by his doctors, other doctors are lazy. The nursing staff is rude and horrible. You work many hours. Your family life is falling apart. You are drowning in debt.
  7. Patients can be amazing. But they can be horrible. They are rude. Ready to sue. Abusive. Refusing to follow instructions. Drug abuse. Think that they are smarter than you. Damn if you do, damn if you don't. If something goes wrong, especially due to your negligence. It's your fault!
  8. Those taller than you are within a beat of your heart and throw you under the bus as soon as things go wrong. You always have to watch your back. Other documents will depress you to make them look better.
  9. Specialization is a long and tedious process. Studying after graduating from college is amazing. Those exams are even more difficult. More money and more sacrifice.
  10. If you are a doctor, the pressure to choose family versus career is always there. Some can cope with good support at home, but others cannot. Surgical fields are heavily dominated by men and female surgeons are the most affected. Which leads to
  11. Extreme sexism in the medical field. It's not that bad now and it depends a lot on the nation you live in. Some believe that a woman cannot be a doctor but only a nurse. Many brilliant female doctors have been called "nurses" by patients and sometimes demand to see a male doctor.
  12. You see the worst in humanity. You realize that people can be extremely cruel, selfish, and stupid. Coping with this and stress at work affects mental health. Many doctors suffer from stress, fatigue, depression, and suicide. They just get heartless because they are so numb from all those years of abuse.
  13. The hospital administration, the government, the doctors union, etc., do not care about you or your well-being. You are just a robot to abuse. Anything positive, they take it quickly. But anything negative, they will never back you up. They will throw you under the bus to save their skin.
  14. You are always paranoid if you did something wrong in handling the treatment. If you calculated the correct dose. Is this patient going to die? What am I going to do if there is no equipment or medication in the hospital? Etc. Insomnia is real!

I am a surgeon who has been in practice for about 25 years.

Most physicians in the United States today are salaried employees of different systems, usually hospital systems that are increasingly vertically and horizontally integrated. This results in a collection of cartels across the country, with each area having a major player, perhaps a couple, and some smaller, less competitive systems. A new doctor is likely to work for one of these companies. It doesn't matter if it's a non-profit organization or not, they all work, from a doctor's point of view, more or less the same.

From the employer's perspective,

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I am a surgeon who has been in practice for about 25 years.

Most physicians in the United States today are salaried employees of different systems, usually hospital systems that are increasingly vertically and horizontally integrated. This results in a collection of cartels across the country, with each area having a major player, perhaps a couple, and some smaller, less competitive systems. A new doctor is likely to work for one of these companies. It doesn't matter if it's a non-profit organization or not, they all work, from a doctor's point of view, more or less the same.

From an employer perspective, it is much more profitable to hire "allied health professionals" (nurses and medical assistants) to do more and more work and hire fewer and fewer doctors. There are several arguments used to justify this approach, but it is primarily a financial decision. The main health system in my community, for example, has 50,000 employees, and has publicly stated that this is its goal.

So regardless of the miserable electronic registration and crushing bureaucratic requirements issued by the government, there will be fewer and fewer jobs. Look at the pharmacies: Walgreens and CVS have an on-site pharmacist and 3 or 4 technicians. And that's because the pharmacy board makes them. If they could have a pharmacist available at a kiosk in various stores, I'm sure they would.

A nursing degree will allow someone to work in health care faster and with much less debt. If it is complemented with training as a nurse practitioner, the individual will have more employment opportunities, will be in greater demand because it is more desirable from a hospital perspective, and will have much less debt.

The only way to change this is to make patients aware and demand to see a doctor. In my community, this situation has evolved to the point that the first person to see a new cancer patient is usually a NP, and the supervising oncologist pokes his head out the door at the end of the visit, and no one complains.

There are many reasons this has evolved, and we could argue about its relative importance for days. Unlike the lawyers, who retained their autonomy, the doctors have given up and yielded. Many are unhappy and do not see that the situation improves. But if asked, they will be honest. Therefore, you may be told not to do medicine.

Reasons not to be a doctor: future doctor

The 2012 Medscape survey result shows that 54% of physicians would choose to enter medicine again as their committed career path. This percentage is surprisingly low considering the number of practicing doctors in our country. So why are so many doctors unhappy with their careers? Why shouldn't you try becoming a doctor in the first place? Here are some reasons not to be a doctor.

1. Extensive school and training

To become a full-fledged practicing physician, you must complete four years of college, four years of medical school, residency,

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Reasons not to be a doctor: future doctor

The 2012 Medscape survey result shows that 54% of physicians would choose to enter medicine again as their committed career path. This percentage is surprisingly low considering the number of practicing doctors in our country. So why are so many doctors unhappy with their careers? Why shouldn't you try becoming a doctor in the first place? Here are some reasons not to be a doctor.

1. Extensive school and training

To become a full-fledged practicing physician, you must complete four years of university, four years of medical school, residency (duration depends on specialty, but usually at least 3 years), and sometimes scholarship (The duration also depends on the specialty). Until all of this is over, you won't earn a doctor's salary. Some people believe that all that time is not worth it.

2. Huge debt from medical school

Average debt for medical students in 2012 was $ 166,750. Because residents and fellows don't earn a substantial starting salary, it can take an incredibly long time to pay off all that debt. You will most likely pay at least double what you borrowed and it will take you more than 10 years to pay it all off.

3. Decreased autonomy

Increasingly, the way doctors treat their patients is determined by the willingness of the insurance company to pay for the treatments or procedures. This conditional treatment frustrates doctors because they are unable to offer their patients the proper medical care they might need.

4. Work is not worth the money

On paper, it seems that becoming a doctor is a surefire way to earn a lot of money. However, the Medscape survey reveals that only 11 percent of doctors consider themselves wealthy. Many doctors feel that they are not making enough money because they are still paying off debt and spending a lot on malpractice insurance, not to mention a variety of other expenses. Doctors also think that they are poorly paid for the amount of work they do, especially since the typical doctor works more than the standard 40 workweek.

5. Administrative overwork

Most people become doctors to treat patients, not to run paperwork. However, a third of doctors spend more than 10 hours a week fulfilling these duties.

6. Costs and Negligence Claims

According to the AMA, in malpractice lawsuits, the defendant (the doctor) wins 91% of the time. However, these cases can go on for an average of four years and doctors must pay for their defense throughout that time. Negligence insurance premiums are high, and more and more patients are finding reasons to sue their doctors.

7. Stressful and demanding job

Much is expected of doctors. Many doctors are constantly available. Most doctors work more than 40 hours a week. Their work is stressful because they deal with sick and often frustrated people. They carry a great burden on their shoulders because people's lives are in their hands. Many physicians feel overworked and stressed due to these pressures.

8. The difficulty of reconciling work and life

Long working hours mean fewer hours at home with family and friends. Doctors can find it difficult to balance work and life outside. This struggle influences the high divorce rate among doctors (29%).

Article Source: Reasons Not to Be a Doctor: Possible Doctor

My wife is currently a resident physician in her second year. She often works more than 90 hours a week (we live an hour from her job, so she adds 2 more hours away from home).

He is currently doing something called "night float" where he works at night and comes home during the day. She usually leaves around 6:45 pm and comes back around 10:00 am She wakes up around 6:00 pm from sleeping and I try to catch her for a few minutes before she leaves again. This has been going on for a month now and thankfully it is almost over.

Before that, I had to do a 24 hour shift once a day.

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My wife is currently a resident physician in her second year. She often works more than 90 hours a week (we live an hour from her job, so she adds 2 more hours away from home).

He is currently doing something called "night float" where he works at night and comes home during the day. She usually leaves around 6:45 pm and comes back around 10:00 am She wakes up around 6:00 pm from sleeping and I try to catch her for a few minutes before she leaves again. This has been going on for a month now and thankfully it is almost over.

Before that, I had to do a 24 hour shift once a week and all kinds of crazy schedules. She is constantly sleep deprived, she doesn't have enough time with friends, and of course we don't have enough time together as partners.

It is emotionally draining work. Despite being perpetually exhausted, you should always be at your best game. People's lives depend on it. Even the smallest mistake and there is immense stress involved, not just from the patients and their families, but from the program and attendees as well.

You accumulate a mountain of debt (around $ 250,000 in our case) and despite pursuing it quite aggressively, at an interest rate of ~ 6%, it is bearish to even pay interest every year (luckily, we roll this up to 4%, which is helping).

We have to miss meetings with friends, celebrations with the family, trips and all kinds of social commitments because it does not fit his schedule.


In a word, doctors advise other people not to become doctors because they know how incredibly draining, emotionally draining, and painful it can be.

But I also want to say that some people, like my wife, were made to be doctors.

She is compassionate and empathetic even when worn to the bone.

She is deeply intellectual, with a mind that excels at solving complex and challenging problems.

She has courage and stamina like I've never seen before.

He loves to heal and help people.

I couldn't be more proud of the amazing woman that she is and I am so honored to be her partner on this crazy journey of life. Is not easy. Actually, it is sometimes very difficult. But in life, finding purpose is one of the most powerful things you can do. I think 99% of people die without finding it. I think I'm still looking. My wife has found hers, and that is something magical.

When I see doctors advising against it, it is usually for one or more of the following reasons:
1. If people are ASKING, they may not be called.
2. The workload is insane, from the safe residence.
3. Debt is outrageous and student loan debt is NOT written off even in bankruptcy. MANY doctors are still paying off their loans in their 40s.
4. It takes a LONG time to become a doctor. In the United States, after a bachelor's degree in something is 4 years of graduate study in medicine and at least 3 years of residency; in some cases 7 years (depends on your field) and then some doctors do a scholarship on top of that.

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When I see doctors advising against it, it is usually for one or more of the following reasons:
1. If people are ASKING, they may not be called.
2. The workload is insane, from the safe residence.
3. Debt is outrageous and student loan debt is NOT written off even in bankruptcy. MANY doctors are still paying off their loans in their 40s.
4. It takes a LONG time to become a doctor. In the United States, after a bachelor's degree in something is 4 years of graduate study in medicine and at least 3 years of residency; in some cases 7 years (depends on your field) and then some doctors do a scholarship on top of that.
5. The sport of "doc bashing" is apparently becoming the world's favorite pastime.
6. Insurance interferes with patient care AND is very time consuming, staff time at least, but also some time for doctors, with things like their “pre-authorization” demands.
7. Government regulations abound and are often a bummer.
8. Big Pharma is a problem. Only we and New Zealand allow direct patient advertising. Then there are also problems with "one pill for each disease". Many doctors do not like that approach and would appreciate it if patients can make lifestyle changes that would solve a LOT of problems for which the pills are distributed.
9. There is a shortage, so there is too much work; very little time to do everything; patients are becoming more complex (more of a significant medical problem like diabetes and heart disease). and
10. For someone like a PCP, a workweek of 80 is NORMAL. Yes, twice what most people work.

He didn't even touch things like negligence; Dr. Google; or the joys of kidnapping (most doctors accept Medicare…).

Again, NOT a doctor; I don't even have one in the family, so don't say the doctors complain about what I said. All of the above is checked. That said, if you have the calling AND the ability, chances are there is a doctor in your future.

I agree with David Chan regarding all the truths he is talking about. I think you should be allowed to tell the truth about the real struggles that being a doctor entails ... everyone else complains freely about their own jobs ... I don't think I've ever encouraged anyone not to go into medicine, but I think people need to be aware of the good and the bad and what they are getting into and what it takes to be able to graduate and not give up in the middle of training and start doing something else that commonly happens. There are long hours of study for a lifetime. . Now if you don't mind that much, Da

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I agree with David Chan regarding all the truths he is talking about. I think you should be allowed to tell the truth about the real struggles that being a doctor involves ... everyone else complains freely about their own jobs ... I don't think I've ever encouraged anyone not to study medicine, but I think people should be aware of the good and the bad and what they are getting into and what it takes to be able to graduate and not give up in the middle of training and start doing something else that commonly happens. There are long hours of study for a lifetime. . Now if you don't care much about what David said, and you think it would be okay if you made the sacrifices you mentioned in order to become a doctor, you would actually encourage people to take up medicine. I still love the countryside and have some passion for it, although not naive about what it entails. Personally, I like to study and I also discovered that medicine is more of a lifestyle than a profession (my opinion). You must agree to study hard and work long hours. However, that does not matter too much to me and I try to enjoy the teaching part, helping people and I like the intellectual challenge. It is not a lie that at times I have felt exhausted and demoralized by the prostitution that accompanies many of the things we do and also the financial stress of the formative years plus the first few years of attendance. I believe that everything must be weighed to make the big decision to enter medicine. It should not be taken lightly, especially since we will deal with human life and there are a lot of responsibilities and liabilities. All of these are realities and truths of being a doctor at least in the US.

I don't advise anyone to go into medicine unless they are passionate about caring for patients. Education and training are too expensive and time consuming if you are in medicine for prestige or income, which are declining compared to previous generations.

From a profit standpoint, the return on investment is terrible. The average medical graduate is leaving medical school with nearly $ 300,000 in student debt and must still have postgraduate training lasting an additional 3-8 years before beginning their profession.

Given the reality of buying malpractice insurance, workers

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I don't advise anyone to go into medicine unless they are passionate about caring for patients. Education and training are too expensive and time consuming if you are in medicine for prestige or income, which are declining compared to previous generations.

From a profit standpoint, the return on investment is terrible. The average medical graduate is leaving medical school with nearly $ 300,000 in student debt and must still have postgraduate training lasting an additional 3-8 years before beginning their profession.

Given the realities of buying malpractice insurance, workers' compensation, and employee health benefits, and the incredible regulatory burden placed on medical practice by the ACA, very few residents and graduate fellows enter private practice at the present. They are taking salaried positions in health systems that reduce incomes.

Given the routine 1-2 year gap between college and medical school, the average age of a new doctor is 30 to 30 years.

There are many other options for smart, hardworking young adults. A software engineer at Facebook or Google is earning more in salary, stock options, and benefits in their mid-20s than a primary care physician who starts in their 30s and goes to work.

Many doctors complain that the electronic medical record documentation and ordering process reduces the time spent interacting with patients and family members, while adding an average of an additional 90 minutes to each work day.

Well, I can't talk about medicine in other countries, but there are several factors. The profession looks glamorous on TV, but it's not really reality. That may seem obvious to most, but you will be surprised.

Then there is the medical school itself, which may be a shock to the system for some, but I daresay there are a lot of difficult degrees as well. The actual work, although once qualified, presents several problems. The hours are horrible, you will miss birthdays, funerals, reunions and other similar events. You must work hard to maintain relationships (both platonic and romantic) if they break down

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Well, I can't talk about medicine in other countries, but there are several factors. The profession looks glamorous on TV, but it's not really reality. That may seem obvious to most, but you will be surprised.

Then there is the medical school itself, which may be a shock to the system for some, but I daresay there are a lot of difficult degrees as well. The actual work, although once qualified, presents several problems. The hours are horrible, you will miss birthdays, funerals, reunions and other similar events. You must work hard to maintain relationships (both platonic and romantic) as they fall apart easily. For women it can present specific problems when it comes to relating. It takes so many years of training that your peak years of earnings and skills come at the cost of time and much later than your peers of age.

Then there are those who work in resource-limited settings, which comes with their own frustrations. You have many patients with various illnesses and limited treatment options that negatively affect job satisfaction. But the innovation and creativity that the environment brings is worth the effort!

Finally, remember that work is often done at the expense of the doctor's own health. The first years of trying to find a balance between work, school and life are difficult. Most of us neglect our own health in addition to the fact that we are exposed to infections and the like all the time.

It is a lovely profession, once you are in it and find your love, it is very rewarding, but we tend to do the opposite of how it is perceived on TV and throw depressing tails of what it is like. Most of us also know some sad stories of people who joined the profession and did not do well. So in some cases, we feel compelled to warn those we care about. Personally, I don't see myself doing anything else and wouldn't want to do anything else right now, but it comes at a cost.

1. Ten to thirteen year study period during which you are paid less than most of your peers; this continues well into our twenties and thirties.

2. The course can end there, the study is for life; you are always a student as medicine is constantly changing.

3.Lots of competitive exams that are stressful and take a heavy toll on your life, health, and sometimes relationships.

4. Weird work hours, true for most of us, including so-called "coolest" branches like radiology or pathology. Where do you think I, as a medical doctor, get my reports at 3 in the morning?

5 weekends and holidays

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1. Ten to thirteen year study period during which you are paid less than most of your peers; this continues well into our twenties and thirties.

2. The course can end there, the study is for life; you are always a student as medicine is constantly changing.

3.Lots of competitive exams that are stressful and take a heavy toll on your life, health, and sometimes relationships.

4. Weird work hours, true for most of us, including so-called "coolest" branches like radiology or pathology. Where do you think I, as a medical doctor, get my reports at 3 in the morning?

5. Weekends and holidays are never guaranteed free time. However, you never forget your first hospital party.

Complicated Life Schedule: Long family vacations and that first cousin wedding that everyone is going to is not something you can count on. Your own wedding and the possibility of having biological children may or may not be delayed until biology does not allow you to continue doing so. Not to say that there are no happily married people in the medical field, but there are enough women like me, who call off marriage for one more competition. (It's addictive, really).

7. Stunted personal growth in some areas. We feel like college students into our late twenties and behave similarly, which boggles the mind of that 25-year-old who expertly manages the kitchen, a job, and her two adorable babies.

8. We see death, suffering, and pain on a daily basis. It is humiliating, exhausting, and absorbing. It forces you to grow in some way that your peers won't understand until much later in life. It can leave you frustrated and depressed at times, grateful for what life gives you at other times.

9. The blame game. Watch today's news and you will realize how risky it is to be a doctor today. Broken noses, ruptured tympanic membranes, arrests and incarcerations, broken limbs, shot to death, stripped of clothes, all this and more has happened to the doctors who "could not save the patient." Let me tell you, we want nothing more than to save your loved ones, but sometimes it's beyond our best abilities, sometimes it's resource limitation, and sometimes it's just what it is.

We feel very bad and your hitting us will not bring them back.

These are some of the reasons that come to mind when faced with such a question.

Of course, there is the other side to this story as with all stories, but that deserves to be an answer to a completely different question.

Even with the above, do I regret becoming a doctor?

Not a bit.

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