Why do all jobs need experience? Where will I find it if no one wants to hire me without experience?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Reuben Palmer



Why do all jobs need experience? Where will I find it if no one wants to hire me without experience?

Oh yeah, the classic chicken and egg dilemma. These jobs need experience, but how do you get experience without a job?

Author of the photo; aitoff via Pixabay

First, we must look at things from the perspective of the company. You need to fill a position and go to the "market".

There are a variety of qualified applicants. Who do you hire? Someone with experience or someone you have to train?

So how do you break this chain?

Some companies offer internships, paid and unpaid. The understanding is that they are investing in their training. In return, the company will offer you a job and you will accept it.

Some schools

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Oh yeah, the classic chicken and egg dilemma. These jobs need experience, but how do you get experience without a job?

Author of the photo; aitoff via Pixabay

First, we must look at things from the perspective of the company. You need to fill a position and go to the "market".

There are a variety of qualified applicants. Who do you hire? Someone with experience or someone you have to train?

So how do you break this chain?

Some companies offer internships, paid and unpaid. The understanding is that they are investing in their training. In return, the company will offer you a job and you will accept it.

Some schools offer programs and courses where you can actually work on real business projects, rather than hypothetical in the classroom. If not, you can always talk to your advisor about creating one. (This works. I did this during my MBA program, while still serving in the Navy.)

Reinvest your time

Finally, I'm sure you feel that your plate is already quite full of studies. But you need to see anything you do as an investment: writing and blogging, participating on social media, posting content, etc.

Do things relevant to the roles you would like to get. If you want to be a software coder / engineer, write the code and submit it to Github. Be active in the software community and where you are.

If you want to get hired as a social media manager, be active on your own accounts, but see if you can help a local community or non-profit organization. Volunteering is one of the easiest ways to get "experience" for your resume.

But here's the catch: if you do things with an agenda, it will work. I hope you have entered your field because it fascinates you and you enjoy it on some level. Have a destination in mind, but as cliche as it may sound, enjoy the ride!

This is a great question and I'm sure many others are in the same boat as you. My first question for you would be to ask what age group are you in? Are you a recent college graduate? Because if so, there are MANY opportunities for new college graduates to land their first full-time job without much experience.

Companies targeting the new graduate market expect employees to enter with minimal work experience and require more investment in up-front training. To learn about companies that have new graduate jobs, I would recommend doing the following:

  • Attend recruitment fairs at your university or
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This is a great question and I'm sure many others are in the same boat as you. My first question for you would be to ask what age group are you in? Are you a recent college graduate? Because if so, there are MANY opportunities for new college graduates to land their first full-time job without much experience.

Companies targeting the new graduate market expect employees to enter with minimal work experience and require more investment in up-front training. To learn about companies that have new graduate jobs, I would recommend doing the following:

  • Attend recruitment fairs at your college or local colleges in the area where you would like to work. You don't have to go to that college to go to their hiring fairs, this is called a rush!
  • Look for larger companies. Larger companies often have college recruiting initiatives. Browse jobs on your college recruiting pages and once you find a few that interest you, try reaching out to the recruiter or hiring manager via LinkedIn / email to express your interest.
  • When searching online job portals for job openings, use search terms such as "recent graduate" or "entry level." Companies are investing a LOT in hiring new graduates right now.

If you are not included in the "new graduates" group of the workforce, then you must take the experience you have and sell it. In general, look for jobs that only require 0-2 years of experience. These employers will be more forgiving of candidates who may not be all that they are looking for.

You do not have to meet 100% of the requirements to apply for a job. Remember, skills can be learned, but character cannot be taught. Apply for jobs where you are confident that you will excel and shine. In your application, highlight the relevant experiences you have and your passion for the position. If you don't have any transferable experience, focus on why you would be a great fit for the position. An experienced employer will know that a passionate and motivated employee for success will easily outperform someone who has the skills but a terrible attitude.

Also, remember that the “experience” does not necessarily have to come from paid work experiences. As John Carpenter already said, you gain experience simply by experiencing life. Experience can be gained through volunteer work, education, side projects, world exploration, etc.

Hello Job Seeker:

There is nothing called "inexperienced". Who taught the newborn to cry when hungry (without this sign neither the mother will not feed). This shows that her experience started from the first day she was born!

According to statistics from major job boards such as Monster, Indeed, Careerbuilder, etc., there are more vacancies and jobs for Freshers than there are incumbents, experienced and experienced people.

So where did you learn that there are no jobs for interns? Companies are eager to bring new talent and new ideas into their organizations.

If you are 25 years old and you start

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Hello Job Seeker:

There is nothing called "inexperienced". Who taught the newborn to cry when hungry (without this sign neither the mother will not feed). This shows that her experience started from the first day she was born!

According to statistics from major job boards such as Monster, Indeed, Careerbuilder, etc., there are more vacancies and jobs for Freshers than there are incumbents, experienced and experienced people.

So where did you learn that there are no jobs for interns? Companies are eager to bring new talent and new ideas into their organizations.

If you are 25 years old and starting your career, that means you are bringing 25 years of experience with you. Don't you know that just by living in this world we gain experience every day?

Some jobs require education, some want a certification or an apprenticeship.

But there are entry-level jobs that require no experience.

I couldn't get a job in my field after college, so I sold cameras. It didn't pay well, but I learned about sales and customer service.

I finally got a job in computer science because of my college statistics course using mainframes.

When you start working for money and money alone, you will find yourself without opportunities. Don't work just for the money, especially in the beginning, and try to gain valuable experience. If you know your job well enough, people will come to you for jobs.

Start with an internship or volunteer work and work on things you can be proud of. Something that you can display and it becomes your recognition.

Thanks for A2A I hope it helps answer your question.

I totally agree with @john carpenter. To add to that. Someone once asked, where do I start? Another one answered, starts from where you are. The point here is to start developing, develop a skill in relevant areas and, in it, get down to work. With this you increase your relevance and employment possibilities.

Something is not right here. "" Entry-level positions, "by definition, are aimed at people with the right qualifications (mainly the corresponding education) and almost all companies with more than a few people have them. Is it possible that you are not applying for qualifications? entry level or Don't have the proper education?

It's quite difficult, but it also depends on being in the right place at the right time, especially for me.

I suggest trying to get a retail or fast food job, those jobs tend to hire just about anyone with no experience. I also know that MACY's will give you a chance if you are inexperienced. I went to an interview with them before I got my first job. (I didn't get the job, but I was also very shy and had never been in an interview before and didn't know how to answer his questions. Hahaha)

I consider myself to have obtained three “first jobs” without experience, due to my situation.

My first "job" I g

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It's quite difficult, but it also depends on being in the right place at the right time, especially for me.

I suggest trying to get a retail or fast food job, those jobs tend to hire just about anyone with no experience. I also know that MACY's will give you a chance if you are inexperienced. I went to an interview with them before I got my first job. (I didn't get the job, but I was also very shy and had never been in an interview before and didn't know how to answer his questions. Hahaha)

I consider myself to have obtained three “first jobs” without experience, due to my situation.

I got my first “job” in May 2011 in a mailroom, I got it through the government through their public assistance program. I worked two different jobs through the government and always considered them volunteer jobs when speaking in interviews as it sounds better as it is embarrassing to have to tell people that you used to be in Public Assistance and the government gave you a job to support yourself .

My first "paid" job, which I got in 2012, was in retail. I went to a career fair that told me about my second volunteer job. There was a very popular discount store that was opening a new store and when I spoke to them they just gave me a flyer and told me to go to orientation and they hired me on the spot!

Which was funny because I was one of the few people who didn't have to take their 40 minute test on the computer, like at the time, they just hired someone. (Probably also why a lot of people got laid off after the Christmas season ... I was the only survivor from my orientation group of 8. They all quit or got fired for stealing / swearing in front of clients.)
I became friends with one of the girls who started in 2016, and he is now a manager. Sometimes he does the professional fairs and he told me that they don't hire like that anymore. They tell them to go online and answer the questionnaire, and if they pass it, they could hire them after an interview. Oh how times have changed. LOL

Due to these two situations, they basically handed me my first job without much effort. The same goes for retail.

My last first job was in Data Entry, which I acquired in 2018. The main reason I got that job was because I could type fast, especially with the number keys to the right of a keyboard. Working in retail for 5 years allowed me to acquire the ability to type numbers quickly because I am a cashier.

I didn't have the experience for any of these jobs, while two of them hired me right away, the retail job held me back because I was able to get the job done.
The last job liked my typing ability, so if someone is good at writing, I could see if they could get a typing job as their first job.

At the end of the day, you just have to keep trying and see what happens! Try entry-level, data entry, or retail jobs.

I also recommend looking at the interview questions and answers to prepare. I found that the more interviews I do, the more comfortable I feel with them. I have been in 60 interviews since 2011 and I am no longer afraid of them and because I have been in so many of them the answers are ingrained in my head right now. lmao

Desperation is not helping you get a job.

I don't doubt your emotional pressure. I can share that the situation is very problematic, if you can work, if you want to work but somehow, you don't have the opportunity to fight.

I'm not clear about your age, gender, or qualification, the first two shouldn't matter, but let's face it, they're all valid factors for why you are hired and why not, plus you are not giving any reason why you are being rejected. .

So let me take you to the shack and bring up some things that I would say to my own children.

  • you get nothing if you don't know how to do it.
  • it's better b
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Desperation is not helping you get a job.

I don't doubt your emotional pressure. I can share that the situation is very problematic, if you can work, if you want to work but somehow, you don't have the opportunity to fight.

I'm not clear about your age, gender, or qualification, the first two shouldn't matter, but let's face it, they're all valid factors for why you are hired and why not, plus you are not giving any reason why you are being rejected. .

So let me take you to the shack and bring up some things that I would say to my own children.

  • you get nothing if you don't know how to do it.
  • it's better to be good than look good
  • education does matter, if you don't believe me, try ignorance.
  • try the same and expect a different result, it's close to insanity
  • try nothing, it's beyond words
  • where have you been failing lately, are you learning something? (My kids know this as The Valley of Tears; learning sometimes hurts; today is such a day, it's cold and it's raining colder, my daughter is in the pool doing a live guard training, 32 hours. Proud of my girl, because she is a tough cookie and I am a "bad" father who tells her what she does not want to hear.
  • doing and serving is better then winning - where have you volunteered in the last two years? All his time and energy was wasted waiting for a job, falling into his lap. Did you try to meet with cleaning services? Did you try McDonald's? How many agencies have you contacted to find work?
  • What have you read lately

If you don't see anything that the newsletter actually matches by falling into that category, or you can't tell that your actions in the past year disprove that point, then your despair stems from wishful thinking.

My first question is why aren't you enrolled in any job training programs, schools, internships, or online classes?

What is your rating?

What do you want to do?

How is your CV?

Actually, a month is not that long to be looking at, although I'm sure it seems like an eternity. If you get a lot of interviews, that means your resume and other information attract employers.

Here are some things you can do to speed things up and increase your chance of getting a job soon. (I know you may have already done some of these things.)

1. Ask yourself if you are receiving interviews for jobs that you really want and are highly qualified for. If the answer to any of those pieces is No, adjust the jobs you are applying for and adjust your resume, etc.

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Actually, a month is not that long to be looking at, although I'm sure it seems like an eternity. If you get a lot of interviews, that means your resume and other information attract employers.

Here are some things you can do to speed things up and increase your chance of getting a job soon. (I know you may have already done some of these things.)

1. Ask yourself if you are receiving interviews for jobs that you really want and are highly qualified for. If the answer to any of those pieces is No, then adjust the jobs you are applying for and adjust your resume, etc. to find jobs that are a better fit.

2. Follow up with the people / companies you have interviewed with. Send a thank you note (email is fine). Then after a week or ten days, you can follow up with another short email to emphasize your interest in the position, mentioning one specific thing about your qualifications and asking if there is more information you can provide.

3. If you know someone who works for the organizations you've applied to, see if you can reach them and find out how long their hiring process usually takes. It is useful to know.

4. If you get the first few interviews, but no callbacks or job offers, and if you know or are fairly certain that other candidates are already being called or hired, here are some ways to prepare even better for future interviews: Do your research. a little about the company and the position. Read the job description carefully and think specifically about which parts of your experience are most closely related to what they need. Read the company's website to find out what's important to them and be successful there. Read about the company elsewhere - Glassdoor, Indeed, newspapers, trade organizations, even Yelp - to find out what other people are saying who are important there.

5. Prepare for each interview by identifying 3 things you want to make sure they know about you at the end of the interview. It will base them on something I mention in n. ° 4. Also identify 3 things you want to learn in the interview. You won't necessarily be asked a question about exactly the 3 things you want them to know, but you will have prepared to mention the 3 things in the course of answering the questions. Of course, you will tell them a lot of other things in an interview, but thinking ahead about your 3 things will help you to be clear and articulate. The same goes for the 3 things you want to learn about them: you will ask better questions and be more observant, which will help them see that you are really interested.

6. Keep it up. Looking for work is difficult, it can take time and perseverance, but if you are focused and well prepared, you will learn with each interview and you will get a job.

7. Find a friend or job search group. (Your state or local government or a nonprofit organization may offer job search support groups.) It's easier to keep looking when you have someone to compare notes with, and you can practice answering interview questions with a friend.

8. Take good care of yourself. Job hunting is stressful. Make sure you get enough sleep, eat well, and make time to enjoy friends or nature or just a cup of tea. There are many inexpensive ways to take good care of yourself, all of which will help you appear better in interviews and better manage stress.

I cannot tell from your question what experience you have or if you are getting a second interview. I also can't tell if they tell you that you are no longer being considered or just don't get a response. In any case, my advice is good for anyone looking for a job.

Wishing you all the best,

First, job candidates can gain experience for many positions before seeking employment. Volunteer and internship experience counts, so it's best to plan ahead. In addition, internships often lead to job offers.

If an individual does not have the time to gain experience for the job of interest, a job follow-up application can be initiated with another employer. Observed details can be used to substantiate interest in a position through a cover letter. Although job shadowing is often recommended for high school students determining a career field of study, there are certainly no rules.

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First, job candidates can gain experience for many positions before seeking employment. Volunteer and internship experience counts, so it's best to plan ahead. In addition, internships often lead to job offers.

If an individual does not have the time to gain experience for the job of interest, a job follow-up application can be initiated with another employer. Observed details can be used to substantiate interest in a position through a cover letter. Although job tracking is generally recommended for high school students determining a career field of study, there are certainly no rules prohibiting its use later on.

A university, or even a high school student, may request a writing assignment from a professor or teacher that is based on interviewing a person employed in a desired field of interest. Most people are willing to help students and are often flattered when asked for an interview. Questions should be asked about educational readiness, training, skills, and particular job duties. Similar to the job shadowing exercise, the role assignment in the interview can be used to substantiate an interest in a position.

If a candidate has just completed the educational requirements for a position, some employers are more than willing to hire someone with no real work experience. Often this means that a lower salary will be offered. Larger employers may offer mentors to guide and train new hires.

Lastly, positions that do not require a degree generally require on-the-job training after hire. For example, an experienced waitress might be preferred, but would likely be considered a candidate with a friendly personality, good memory, and ability to multitask. The highest paying skilled trades often require only minimal education before or after hiring. Employers hire and sponsor on-the-job apprentices to learn the skilled trades while doing work for pay for the months or years necessary to master a specific trade.

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