Why did Steve Jobs hate Android?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Kael Waters



Why did Steve Jobs hate Android?

I will spend every penny of Apple's $ 40 billion in the bank to correct this mistake. I am going to destroy Android because it is a stolen product. I'm willing to wage a thermonuclear war over this.

Well Steve Jobs was pretty clear about his position on Android phones, right?

Why should I collaborate with Android?
He hated the very idea of ​​Android until his last breath.
Android may come in sugary flavors, but for Steve, Android tasted like a bitter betrayal of trust.


2001 The
founders of Google approached Steve and asked if he would like to be the CEO of Google. Steve politely declined; however, he left

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I will spend every penny of Apple's $ 40 billion in the bank to correct this mistake. I am going to destroy Android because it is a stolen product. I'm willing to wage a thermonuclear war over this.

Well Steve Jobs was pretty clear about his position on Android phones, right?

Why should I collaborate with Android?
He hated the very idea of ​​Android until his last breath.
Android may come in sugary flavors, but for Steve, Android tasted like a bitter betrayal of trust.


2001 The
founders of Google approached Steve and asked if he would like to be the CEO of Google. Steve politely declined; however, he offered to be her mentor.
Steve saw Google as a large company with no overlap with Apple's vision at the time. All the good and friendship between the companies at that time was quite evident.

2004
Apple secretly began development of the initial version of the iPhone. Obviously, no one except a few at Apple knows the iPhone.

2005
Google quietly bought Android. Not many at that time know exactly what they are doing. There were some reports that Android creates software and operating systems for wireless devices.
I'm not sure if Steve was fully aware of Google's intentions at this point due to my next point.

2006
Then-Google CEO Eric Schmidt joined Apple's board. This tells us that there was still a lot of friendship between the companies.
Apple and Google collaborated to install Google Maps on the iPhone that has yet to be released. Apple shared some of the early design details of the iPhone with the Google Maps team to make sure Google Maps works well on the iPhone.

2007
Apple released the first iPhone and the world went crazy. And Google, having little idea of ​​what the iPhone would look like, built its first Android prototype. No wonder it looked like this.

And then there was the presentation of Steve's iPhone. And Google decided to remove the mask and decided to launch fully into mobile phones. Google engineers immediately went to the drawing board and began designing the touch phones.

2008
Up to this point, Steve thought Android would just be a Google hobby. And he didn't see Google as a serious competitor. But then he discovered that Google was serious about building a mobile phone, thus competing directly with the iPhone.

And Steve was pretty clear about what he wanted:

In a particularly heated meeting in 2008 on the Google campus, Jobs angrily told Google executives that if they implemented a multi-touch version, the popular iPhone feature that allows users to control their devices with the movements of their fingers, he would sue.

Of course, Google was not going to back down. The mobile business is too lucrative and losing mobile search could be a fatal blow to Google. Search is THE lifeline of Google then and now. Obviously, Google couldn't pass it up to placate Jobs.

2009–2010
Android-powered devices kept getting better. Steve began to worry about Android devices flooding the market. He began to openly criticize Google for copying the iPhone. Steve, after one of their presentations, said:
“They chose to enter our market. We do not enter the search space. Make no mistake, they want to kill the iPhone. Don't be evil is great nonsense! "

And later that month, days after Jobs scoffed at Google's "Don't be evil" mantra, Google dropped any pretense of reconciliation: it shipped a software update to the Nexus One, adding multi-touch capabilities and thus openly crossing over A line. that Mr. Jobs had drawn in the sand.

And that's how the war started and after Steve's death, I guess Tim Cook took a more measured approach with Google. And it seems that now, both companies have established themselves recognizing each other's space.

Why was Steve Jobs never interested in collaborating with Android?
Probably because I wanted to destroy Android :)


Referee:

Apple's dispute with Google is getting personal

He never collaborated with Android, because he hated it.

Android was something I wanted to shut down, from the day Android was released to the general public.

Why?

Due to the fact that he believed, that Android was a complete scam of iOS, or at that time, iPhone OS.

He even said sometimes that good artists copy, great artists steal.

A little hypocritical, but it seems that philosophy only applies to him.

Android was first released in 2004. In April 2004, Android was only releasing an advanced camera operating system prototype, which changed 5 months later when investors and customers did not respond to the search.

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He never collaborated with Android, because he hated it.

Android was something I wanted to shut down, from the day Android was released to the general public.

Why?

Due to the fact that he believed, that Android was a complete scam of iOS, or at that time, iPhone OS.

He even said sometimes that good artists copy, great artists steal.

A little hypocritical, but it seems that philosophy only applies to him.

Android first came on the market in 2004. In April 2004, Android was only releasing a prototype of an advanced camera operating system, it changed 5 months later when investors and customers did not respond to digital cameras and switched to trying to finance a Blackberry / Symbian type. telephone. There were no actual products, only proposals.

Google bought them in 2005 on the basis of its proposal for an estimated $ 50 million.

The first Android Beta was not available until November 5, 2007.

Google intended to formally introduce Android commercially in 2007 (which was too ambitious a date) but instead pushed the project away from Blackberry / Symbian-style phones after Apple unveiled the iPhone. The Open Handset Alliance that led to Android adoption never merged until October 2007, largely in response to carrier concerns about Apple's success and its close relationship with AT&T.

In 2006, Android made the first phone. It was quite large. Never released to the public, rather a prototype.

As soon as. Really big. When the first generation of the iPhone, commonly dubbed "iPhone 2G", was launched in 2007, Android changed its design and a year later they launched their new phone.

Steve really hated this, because he thought it was a shameless copy. The software, not the phone itself. He never collaborated, because he hated it and thought it was a copy. Although iOS was similar to the previous models. However, Android became the world's most popular mobile operating system, with iOS in second place.

TL; DR: Steve never collaborated with Android because he didn't like Android very much and thought it was a full copy of iOS.

Edit: credit to Patrick Taylor for pointing out errors in my timeline.

Steve Jobs had great faith in himself. App Store is not a Steve Jobs idea. They persuaded him to change the concept of iPhone. At first I hated the idea. He was convinced that Apple knew what customers wanted. He rejected the idea. Kind of strange, when he imagined iTunes.

Now many myths are developing around it. He was kicked out of Apple! Because his ideas did not pay the divinity. He started doing business on his own and was unable to do so.

However, people with vision are a must for any business. They are stubborn and don't take no for an answer. If they can dream it, they will

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Steve Jobs had great faith in himself. App Store is not a Steve Jobs idea. They persuaded him to change the concept of iPhone. At first I hated the idea. He was convinced that Apple knew what customers wanted. He rejected the idea. Kind of strange, when he imagined iTunes.

Now many myths are developing around it. He was kicked out of Apple! Because his ideas did not pay the divinity. He started doing business on his own and was unable to do so.

However, people with vision are a must for any business. They are stubborn and don't take no for an answer. If they can dream it, they will go through hell and shoot for it to happen. But they need financial guidance not to use up all the development money. That is the reason why he was kicked out of Apple. Development costs did not matter much to him.

He and Bill Gates obtained the source code from Xerox. It only took 16 years to become iOS or Windows.

Hence the comments about the Steve Jobs robbery by Bill Gates. They both obtained the source code from Xerox in 1976 as a gift for helping Xerox with their system. 1976 saw the active use of a touch screen. CERN used the screen to control the particle accelerator. Steve Jobs saw it as his invention, because Apple used it on the iPhone, the first there. He firmly believed that everyone else was copycat.

Android is like that too. Some people who worked for Steve Jobs attended the competition. They probably had other ideas, a prominent idea of ​​allowing consumer choices to be a big part of the operating system.

He saw it as a betrayal, Android also contrasted in every way with his own ideas. He just believed that Apple had such great ideas that Android would never catch on. Nokia had a similar point of view. They couldn't believe that someone could be as good as them.

Samsung saw the potential. They made phones that nobody really wanted to buy. I had one of the older models. Trust me, it only survived to this day, because it was built like a tank. A wet dream of engineering. The user interface was terrible.

I think Samsung took it by surprise. They made Android work. Even becoming popular. If you didn't hate Android before, you certainly knew it along with Samsung.

People can love or hate Steve Jobs, he was a forward-thinking man, who ended up saving Apple. Understand what it takes to make money, a lot of money.

Apple was on the brink of bankruptcy, Bill Gates bailed out Apple in exchange for turning Explorer into a browser for the Mac. No one knows why he did it. A gesture or just rubbing it?

Perhaps why Steve Jobs was so passionate about the iPhone. It was his creation.

Imagine being a co-founder and CEO of Apple who, just over a decade earlier, had returned with his baby just at the point where he was almost on the brink of bankruptcy. But it somehow managed to get Apple back to profitability. So Apple somehow overcomes the devastation that was the dot-com crash because, as you said at your developer conference in 2000, Apple innovated to get out.

At the end of 2005, things were going well enough that, just 8 years after Apple almost went bankrupt, it is necessary to take a chance and effectively recreate the mobile phone.

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Imagine being a co-founder and CEO of Apple who, just over a decade earlier, had returned with his baby just at the point where he was almost on the brink of bankruptcy. But it somehow managed to get Apple back to profitability. So Apple somehow overcomes the devastation that was the dot-com crash because, as you said at your developer conference in 2000, Apple innovated to get out.

At the end of 2005, things were going well enough that, just 8 years after Apple almost went bankrupt, it is necessary to take a chance and effectively recreate the mobile phone. In January 2007, he introduced himself to an audience and created possibly the biggest sensation in the tech industry since the personal computer by introducing Apple's obviously innovative new product, the iPhone. For 2009, it's clear that the product that you and Apple's designers, engineers, and programmers created more or less from scratch is going to be huge.

Then you find out that Google, a company with which you have a close enough relationship that its CEO, Eric Schmidt, has been on Apple's board since 2006 and therefore was aware of the development of the iPhone, is copying the Iphone. He discovers that Google, Apple's board member company, quietly went out and bought a mobile operating system created in part by one of its former employees. And Google also came out and got mobile phone makers, who had been building junk before the iPhone, to sign up to use their new mobile operating system. Unlike its talented folks at Apple, who had to figure out the entire user interface and user experience of the iPhone from scratch, Google pretty much just copies its appearance.

This is simply theft. And it happened through an act of betrayal of trust. This is why Steve Jobs was so upset.

DISCLAIMER: I've never worked for Apple, so I wasn't in the middle of any of this. What I know comes from Steve Jobs' biographer and I trust Steve Job's version of events.

Basically, because Google gave him a sample of their own medicine. Have you ever heard this quote from Bill Gates, in a discussion he had with Jobs around 1985:

"Well Steve ... I think it's more like we both have this rich neighbor named Xerox and I broke into his house to steal the TV and found out that you had already stolen it."

The reference, of course, is that Apple stole the Xerox Alto's graphical user interface and mouse concepts, which they had. Then Microsoft tricked Jobs into giving them a very broad cross-licensing agreement to develop software for the Mac.

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Basically, because Google gave him a sample of their own medicine. Have you ever heard this quote from Bill Gates, in a discussion he had with Jobs around 1985:

"Well Steve ... I think it's more like we both have this rich neighbor named Xerox and I broke into his house to steal the TV and found out that you had already stolen it."

The reference, of course, is that Apple stole the Xerox Alto's graphical user interface and mouse concepts, which they had. Microsoft then tricked Jobs into giving them a very broad cross-licensing agreement to develop software for the Mac. Broad enough to allow Microsoft to implement pretty much the same concepts on Windows that Apple had originally stolen from Xerox and got away with yours.

Well, history repeated itself more than two decades later.

Pay no attention to the mini-QWERTY keyboard, but look at the screen of the Nokia E5–00, a phone introduced in the fall of 2010. Phones with this interface (called the Symbian S60) had come out nine years before this one; I chose this model because I had it and used it until about 2013, and it still works in 2018. Anyway, you see that it has the same kind of app menu as current smartphones. It also had a primitive version of home screen widgets (as much as it could for having such a small screen) and it also had push notifications. It could access the Internet through a 3G connection and did very well as long as Symbian browsers were still supported.

Now, take a look at the original iPhone:

This came out in 2008, but like I said before, Symbian's S60 platform came out in 2001! Apple took the basic design out of it, put it on a larger screen, and added an on-screen capacitive keyboard. Kudos to Apple for those ideas, but they basically ripped up the Symbian UI and gave it a fresh coat of paint.

When the iPhone was a success, Google redesigned Android, which it already owned, to have a similar interface. (I don't understand why Nokia didn't go after them both, but they made a lot of mistakes in those days ...)

Apple broke in and stole the TV again, and then Google broke into Apple and stole it:

(Android 2.3, one of the first usable "copycat" versions, although in practice it made Windows 95 look like a model of reliability).

I'm sure Apple fans have their own opinion on all of this, but Steve Jobs always had a problem with others playing by his rules.

Steve Jobs

I feel like the next few days will be busy as the organic Steve Jobs falls apart. Then, according to the AP, who bought a copy on Thursday (where can I get one?), After Android started to look more and more like iOS, Jobs had extremely harsh words for Eric Schmidt and Google.

Isaacson wrote that when HTC released an Android phone that featured many of the iPhone's touch features and other popular features, Jobs was furious in January 2010.

Apple sued, and Jobs told Isaacson in a spiel that Google's actions amounted to a "grand theft." "I will spend my last death

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Steve Jobs

I feel like the next few days will be busy as the organic Steve Jobs falls apart. Then, according to the AP, who bought a copy on Thursday (where can I get one?), After Android started to look more and more like iOS, Jobs had extremely harsh words for Eric Schmidt and Google.

Isaacson wrote that when HTC released an Android phone that featured many of the iPhone's touch features and other popular features, Jobs was furious in January 2010.

Apple sued, and Jobs told Isaacson in a spiel that Google's actions amounted to a "grand theft." "I'm going to spend my last breath if I need to, and I'm going to spend every penny of Apple's $ 40 billion in the bank,

Google and Apple had worked together to bring Google's search and mapping services provided by Google to the iPhone, executives told the audience, with Schmidt joking that the collaboration was very close.

Two men would simply merge their companies and call them "AppleGoo". "Steve, my congratulations," Mr. Schmidt told his corporate partner. "This product will be hot." Jobs, grinning from ear to ear, appreciated the compliment.

That warmth is in short supply today. Jobs, Schmidt and their companies are now engaged in a grim battle royale over the future and the shape of mobile computing and cell phones, with repercussions reverberating across the digital landscape.

In the past six months, Apple and Google have grappled with acquisitions, patents, directors, advisers, and iPhone apps. Jobs and Schmidt have fired at each other's companies in the media and in private exchanges with employees.

Apple sued HTC, the Taiwanese mobile manufacturer that runs Google's Android operating system, alleging that it had violated HTC.

Patents for iPhone. The move was widely seen as the beginning of Apple's own legal assault on Google itself, as well as an attempt to curb Google's plans to extend its dominance to mobile devices.

Apple believes that devices such as smartphones and tablets should have strictly controlled ownership standards and that customers should benefit from the services on those devices with applications downloaded from Apple's own App Store.

On the other hand, Google wants smartphones to have open, non-proprietary platforms so that users can freely browse the web in search of applications that work on many devices. Google has long feared that rivals like Microsoft or

Apple or wireless carriers like Verizon could block access to services on devices like smartphones,

That could soon eclipse computers as the main gateway to the Web. Google's Android promotion is, in essence, an effort to control your destiny in the mobile world.

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Steve Jobs didn't need to collaborate with Android.

Android is a Google decision (it used to be a small business and then Google bought them).

Ever since Steve Jobs (figuratively) invented the iPhone, creating the smartphone as we know it today, it would have been Google's responsibility to reach out to Steve Jobs and ask him for help building its Android / Droid smartphone operating system.

Android does not bring anything to the market that the iPhone needs, keep in mind that the iPhone is years ahead of Android in both hardware and software. Android is full of mounds, these tricks are used to attract buyers

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Steve Jobs didn't need to collaborate with Android.

Android is a Google decision (it used to be a small business and then Google bought them).

Ever since Steve Jobs (figuratively) invented the iPhone, creating the smartphone as we know it today, it would have been Google's responsibility to reach out to Steve Jobs and ask him for help building its Android / Droid smartphone operating system.

Android does not bring anything to the market that the iPhone needs, keep in mind that the iPhone is years ahead of Android in both hardware and software. Android is full of mounds, these tricks are used to attract buyers but do not improve the functionality of your phones. iPhone (iOS) is designed to work best for people who actually use their phones for useful things (not just playing tricks), so Android has nothing to offer Steve Jobs.

Just look at how many years lag in Android Emoji compares to Android. Find an iPhone user who has the latest version of iOS (75% of them already have it, so it should be easy). Then go to all the Android users you know, have the iPhone user send them all the emoji they have, and check if all Android can display all Emoji. What you will see is a failure rate of maybe 90% or even worse, because Android is so far the iPhone. Emoji is an international standard, issued by the Unicode Consortium, it is not an Apple technology, so it is a great way to check who is really up to date (by delivering open standards-based technology in the hands of most users).

An interesting side note is that the CEO of Google used to be on the Board of Directors of Apple Inc.When Steve Jobs announced to the board that he came up with a new idea to create the iPhone and iPad, the CEO of Google was sitting down. right there and I heard the whole plan. Then he went to the Google engineers and told them what Apple was going to do, and ordered them to copy the exact same concept. Finally, the CEO of Google began to excuse himself from the Apple Board of Directors meeting when Steve Jobs wanted to present the latest design and marketing plan for the iPhone, but by then it was too late, Google had already learned everything it needed to know. To turn Android from a Flip-phone OS into an iPhone clone,

Steve Jobs was fully capable of cooperating with other companies, however, if your plans overlap with his, he is a present or future competitor.

The iPod and iPhone were "walled garden" devices by design, because that's Apple's strategy for success after their return.

SJ had a terrible lesson when Microsoft exclaimed that it might not be compatible with Microsoft Office on Mac, and then made a huge investment in Apple in 1997. That lesson was, own your own end-to-end market without relying on others. We saw the end of Macworld Expos as venues for major Apple launches, creating the AP

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Steve Jobs was fully capable of cooperating with other companies, however, if your plans overlap with his, he is a present or future competitor.

The iPod and iPhone were "walled garden" devices by design, because that's Apple's strategy for success after their return.

SJ had a terrible lesson when Microsoft exclaimed that it might not be compatible with Microsoft Office on Mac, and then made a huge investment in Apple in 1997. That lesson was, own your own end-to-end market without relying on others. We saw the end of Macworld Expos as venues for major Apple launches, the creation of the Apple Store (due to channel issues getting to market) and Apple expanding its own apps so that it is not so dependent on others (drastically changing the third market party apps).

It all comes down to owning it from start to finish, locked in component sourcing, design, logistics, distribution, retail. Then with the new devices, the Mac App Store and the same for iOS.

Android is an alien platform. This and its associated devices compete directly with the iPhone, iPad and the like. Earning a few dollars now means powering that platform and becoming an even worse competitor to the iOS platform.

Don't get me wrong, although it seems like Apple can't have friends - in fact, it does. But those are relationships under your control.

Here is my analogy of Apple and its relationships with others:

Shark and Remora

Remora and shark have different food. The remora does a great support service for the shark and also benefits from the shark's long shadow. The shark can be a fantastic friend for the remora.

But the moment the remora begins to view the shark's food as tasty, the shark begins to view the remora as a competitor. And because of the difference in size and power in the ratio, the remora is finished off with one bite and is easily replaced.

I have worked with many companies over the years that have had this relationship with Apple. It may be great, but you have to understand that relationship or, one day, you might get bitten or replaced.

That's because Steve Jobs was instinctively an individual who preferred proprietary standards over open standards, at least when it came to products. Apple id, once, briefly licenses its operating system for use with third-party hardware. but that experiment did not last long. Since then, virtually every aspect of its technology has been kept under strict ownership control. In the sense that they favor open standards, it is only where it serves to support their market. Even third-party applications are kept under strict control. It permeates every part of Apple's business model quite well. It has served Apple a lot

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That's because Steve Jobs was instinctively an individual who preferred proprietary standards over open standards, at least when it came to products. Apple id, once, briefly licenses its operating system for use with third-party hardware. but that experiment did not last long. Since then, virtually every aspect of its technology has been kept under strict ownership control. In the sense that they favor open standards, it is only where it serves to support their market. Even third-party applications are kept under strict control. It permeates every part of Apple's business model quite well. It has served Apple very well.

I should add, Google is not an angel in this regard either, but it is not as proprietary as Apple in this regard. In the case of Android, Google's business model in the widespread use of open source and licensing the operating system to other vendors was likely dictated by the danger that Apple would succeed in hampering Google's business interests in areas related if IOS became really dominant. So it made sense that there were multiple Apple competitors, all locked into a platform over which Google could have some control. If Google hadn't stepped in, probably some other consortium would have, but this way the company has a good degree of control.

Therefore, there was never any chance for Steve Jobs and Apple to collaborate with Google, as their business interests did not coincide. In fact, it would be quite scary if it did. Imagine what the position would be if a combination of Google and Apple had stitched together the entire technical and commercial eco-structure for the smartphone environment.

Apple demoed the iPhone in January 2007. At the time, Google CEO Eric Schmidt was on Apple's board of directors and Jobs had a very good working relationship with him.

When Android launched a year and a half later, Jobs was furious. I knew Google was working on its own mobile operating system, but until the iPhone announcement, all early prototypes looked exactly like the Blackberry (at the time): a small rectangular (non-touch) screen with a physical QWERTY keyboard, some buttons on the side and a scroll joystick. As a member of Apple's board, Schmidt was able to see

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Apple demoed the iPhone in January 2007. At the time, Google CEO Eric Schmidt was on Apple's board of directors and Jobs had a very good working relationship with him.

When Android launched a year and a half later, Jobs was furious. I knew Google was working on its own mobile operating system, but until the iPhone announcement, all early prototypes looked exactly like the Blackberry (at the time): a small rectangular (non-touch) screen with a physical QWERTY keyboard, some buttons on the side and a scroll joystick. As a member of Apple's board of directors, Schmidt was able to see a prototype of the iPhone before it was announced, immediately realized it was going to take the mobile market by storm (which it did), and instructed his Android team to scrap the iPhone. Blackberry clone and build the OS that looks and works like the iPhone.

When Jobs saw the new Android, he considered Schmidt a traitor and decided to focus all his energy on destroying Android. A well-known quote from that time: "I will spend my last breath if necessary, and I will spend every penny of Apple's $ 40 billion in the bank, to correct this mistake," Jobs said. “I am going to destroy Android, because it is a stolen product. I'm willing to go to thermonuclear war for this. "(Sanitized by removing copious expletives). Since then, Apple's cash reserves have grown to $ 280 billion (with a B), but the" thermonuclear war "at Google yielded little. tangible fruits (aside from some patent infringement verdicts against Samsung).

There was never a damn chance that Jobs had considered working with Google on some collaborative Android project. Hatred for the company and the operating system was taken to the grave, as Apple chose to fight Android in the marketplace, taking profit and customer satisfaction.

Until the launch of the iPhone, Google and Apple had a relatively close working relationship. Eric Schmidt was on the Apple dashboard and Google Maps was included on the iPhone.

After the iPhone came out and was successful, Google completely changed its strategy with Android 1 and created something that is essentially a more crappy version of the iPhone. Given that they perhaps had access to early information about the iPhone and perhaps even knew the strategy details of where the project would go in the future, this seems like a betrayal of trust.

Also, there is very, very little about A

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Until the launch of the iPhone, Google and Apple had a relatively close working relationship. Eric Schmidt was on the Apple dashboard and Google Maps was included on the iPhone.

After the iPhone came out and was successful, Google completely changed its strategy with Android 1 and created something that is essentially a more crappy version of the iPhone. Given that they perhaps had access to early information about the iPhone and perhaps even knew the strategy details of where the project would go in the future, this seems like a betrayal of trust.

Also, there is very, very little about Android that is groundbreaking compared to the iPhone. It's one thing to take your competitor's idea and run it in a new direction, faster and better than they could. It is completely different just to clone it. That's why Steve was angry.

See also my answer to Was it hypocritical for Steve Jobs to declare war on Android for stealing iOS items, considering his history with Xerox and Mac?

1: http://random.andrewwarner.com/what-googles-android-looked-like-before-and-after-the-launch-of-iphone/

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