Why did Google hire you?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Jovanni Nolan



Why did Google hire you?

After an extensive 2.5 month interview process and 6 Google Hangout talks (interviews), 30 minutes each, and an on-site interview, I finally got an offer as a full-time business management partner. She had no experience in the business world and only helped families for whom she worked with experience in cosmetics sales. My friend sent my application internally to a hiring manager; otherwise, most likely I would have missed out on over 1,000 requests. I don't have any formal qualifications other than a UX design certificate in which I took a 3 month intensive course at the General Assembly. With that said, my inte

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After an extensive 2.5 month interview process and 6 Google Hangout talks (interviews), 30 minutes each, and an on-site interview, I finally got an offer as a full-time business management partner. She had no experience in the business world and only helped families for whom she worked with experience in cosmetics sales. My friend sent my application internally to a hiring manager; otherwise, most likely I would have missed out on over 1,000 requests. I don't have any formal qualifications other than a UX design certificate in which I took a 3 month intensive course at the General Assembly. That said, all of my interviews had problem-solving questions that were quite complicated. Some were worded with such difficulty that I had to guess what they really meant. There was no way to study these questions beforehand, because they are not found online and the questions chosen are entirely up to the interviewer. They hired me based on a number of different factors, but they didn't call my references, so that didn't matter, my lack of a college degree didn't matter, and the fact that I had never worked in tech was not at all important. They saw potential in me as a problem solver, a leader, a rapidly adaptable human being, and someone who was full of leadership and entrepreneurial skills. They want every employee who works at Google to take it on as their own company. Share your ideas to improve the world, customers and business and basically feel part of something massive. They want you to be cheerful and sociable. They want it to be easy to be alone with you, but strong to stand up for your goals and aspirations. A Google Entrepreneur is what they aspire to achieve in every customer! I am a Noogler and I feel very lucky to be able to call myself an employee, but one piece of advice: be yourself, be Google and only work here if you really aspire to grow within a company and treat it like your own.

I couldn't see my hiring package, but I suspect these are the main reasons Google hired me:

  • Academic pedigree. I have computer science degrees from MIT and CMU. I've seen recent claims that Google is downplaying the academic pedigree, but that certainly wasn't true in 2009. And I'm skeptical as to how true it is now.
  • Relevant experience. I spent 10 years working on a leading enterprise search platform, where I was a chief scientist and part of the founding team. While Google's hiring process favors generalist engineers, my experience was so relevant that they couldn't ignore it.
  • Pu
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I couldn't see my hiring package, but I suspect these are the main reasons Google hired me:

  • Academic pedigree. I have computer science degrees from MIT and CMU. I've seen recent claims that Google is downplaying the academic pedigree, but that certainly wasn't true in 2009. And I'm skeptical as to how true it is now.
  • Relevant experience. I spent 10 years working on a leading enterprise search platform, where I was a chief scientist and part of the founding team. While Google's hiring process favors generalist engineers, my experience was so relevant that they couldn't ignore it.
  • Public visibility. I gained a fair amount of visibility by blogging and giving public presentations at research and industry conferences. I wouldn't say that I am famous or even famous on the internet, but I was well above average for a software engineer.
  • Friends inside. I met a lot of people on Google. That helped me throughout the entire process, particularly as it provided channels for me to communicate with Google outside of the formal hiring process.
  • I interview well. I'm not a particularly strong software engineer, which was clear once I was hired. But I did very well in the Google interview process, from coding the whiteboard to solving problems on my feet.

Also, my name rhymes with Googlang.

I notice that no one mentioned luck. Luck is a big part of this, don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

In fact, I interviewed myself twice on Google. The first time I went through the hiring committee, and moved to a bid committee, when the position I was assigned to froze. In that situation, I kept my status for 6 months and met additional hiring managers, but my experience was very specific (public cloud) and the freeze was in the public cloud, so nothing else was a good fit.

One year (almost to date) after the first time on the site, I received a call to interview me again. Since it was 6 months after the 6 month

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I notice that no one mentioned luck. Luck is a big part of this, don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

In fact, I interviewed myself twice on Google. The first time I went through the hiring committee, and moved to a bid committee, when the position I was assigned to froze. In that situation, I kept my status for 6 months and met additional hiring managers, but my experience was very specific (public cloud) and the freeze was in the public cloud, so nothing else was a good fit.

One year (almost to date) after the first time on the site, I received a call to interview me again. Since 6 months of the 6-month state shelf life had passed, I had to go back to square one. This time, obviously, I ended up being a Noogler about a month after that call.

Besides luck, I would say that experience in the industry was a big factor. I have no academic pedigree, but I have been fortunate to have been around quite a bit (Amazon, Microsoft, VMware, etc.). Also, performance during websites is critical.

Both times I had been going as a Program Manager, but the second set of interviews was much more focused. In my first experience, I had received many random, and in some cases only tangentially relevant, scenario-type questions (how would you approach thermal management in a given data center… multiple scenarios). Also, since the first pass was for TPM, I got a coding interview (CS-type standard academic questions. I chose pseudocode as the interviewer and I had no common languages ​​other than English :-))

The second experience was a highly focused discussion on program management that focused on realistic hypothetical scenarios (upgrading the entire fleet of Google devices to Chromebooks), as well as real-world personal experience (more complex project, etc.)

One thing worth noting is that these interviews have as much to do with assessing how you approach problem solving and cultural fit as anything else. This can work against introverts I think so it can be quite a challenge. Being open, attractive, curious, and passionate is important. If that doesn't come naturally, it is worth expending energy to be "active" that day.

There is no single factor and part of it is also just luck. You need to be in the right place at the right time, but it takes your effort to put yourself in the right place.
I applied regularly (without the help of references and the like) for over a year before getting a phone interview. I managed to get that phone interview by posting messages on LinkedIn until a recruiter found me interesting. Once I got the phone interview, I think I got it right; the hiring manager was interested in my unique perspective and background. He could also tell that he really loved him and that he would be a good team.

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There is no single factor and part of it is also just luck. You need to be in the right place at the right time, but it takes your effort to put yourself in the right place.
I applied regularly (without the help of references and the like) for over a year before getting a phone interview. I managed to get that phone interview by posting messages on LinkedIn until a recruiter found me interesting. Once I got the phone interview, I think I got it right; the hiring manager was interested in my unique perspective and background. He also realized that he really loved him and that he would make a good teammate.

I have a bachelor's degree from a well-known top-tier school, but not a master's, which probably didn't help. I had a lot of leadership and process improvement experience from my previous job, which I think made a difference.

When I got out of the Army, I never got any momentum, but when I left Amazon, I started to get something, which leads me to believe that having experience at another such venture is helpful.

-be smart

-be a good teammate

-be true to yourself and others

-do not give up

Google hired me because it was convinced that I could fulfill the purpose for which the position was designed.

The following reasons helped Google make their decision and helped me land my job at their Strategy and Operations organization:

  1. Academic Credentials: Although I had no computer science background, I received a highly respected degree in an analytical field from a good institution.
  2. Relevance of work experience: I worked as a management consultant for a few years, first in a company and then in the internal advisory arm of a conglomerate, and had experience in strategy development, business planning, executive communication.
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Google hired me because it was convinced that I could fulfill the purpose for which the position was designed.

The following reasons helped Google make their decision and helped me land my job at their Strategy and Operations organization:

  1. Academic Credentials: Although I had no computer science background, I received a highly respected degree in an analytical field from a good institution.
  2. Relevance of work experience: I worked as a management consultant for a few years, first in a firm and then in the internal advisory arm of a conglomerate, and had experience in strategy development, business planning, executive communication, etc.
  3. Interview performance: I had four rounds of interviews (all via video calls); I invested time to build a cohesive and unique story, and I practiced a lot to communicate concisely and confidently.

The last thing to call it would be Luck; this probably outweighs all of the above reasons. I applied to Google several times before and they never called me. I was lucky enough to apply for a position, for which my profile - not just background, but also location, salary expectation, and time - matched almost perfectly with what the hiring manager had in mind. I had interviewers who graduated from my alma mater. It also happened that I accurately predicted their questions and performed quite well during those interviews.

Interesting answers!
My brother is a computer linguist (or something like that, I have no idea of ​​programming) and he worked as an intern at Google for half a year, working on Google Translate.
I visited him there during his stay (it was in Zurich) and I loved it.
"Hey!" he said. "They also offer marketing interns!" (My field)

I got really excited. My brother helped me work on my resume and cover letter, he also recommended (something that people who work at Google could do). I looked forward to the acceptance letter with confidence. And I hope. And I hope. Then I got an email that

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Interesting answers!
My brother is a computer linguist (or something like that, I have no idea of ​​programming) and he worked as an intern at Google for half a year, working on Google Translate.
I visited him there during his stay (it was in Zurich) and I loved it.
"Hey!" he said. "They also offer marketing interns!" (My field)

I got really excited. My brother helped me work on my resume and cover letter, he also recommended (something that people who work at Google could do). I looked forward to the acceptance letter with confidence. And I hope. And I hope. Then I got an email that they didn't want to interview me.

Truth be told, my brother was in his early twenties at the time, was part of the research team of computer scientists at Uni (again, sorry if my terminology is bad) and had already traveled to various conferences etc.
I was 20 years old. or 21 and my experience was pretty poor, if I look at it now. On the other hand, for example, I also had some volunteering on my resume, which my brother said is very popular with Google employees.

But yeah, luck is definitely a big part, you never know who you're competing with. And I would say that you have participated in some interesting projects.

Planning to try again! :)

My daughter just got hired at Google and she said it wasn't technical knowledge that helped her. He had three college degrees, but they were all in the liberal arts. He also studied astrophysics, played in the Marching Band, and earned an MBA. She said that she could have gotten the job without the teachers and that Google liked that she was a generalist who could adapt to change and that they felt she had that "goodness" meaning she played well with others.

P.S. I must add that he was only 23 years old, so he had little work experience. Google told him that they don't hire as much for the initial job as for the pot

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My daughter just got hired at Google and she said it wasn't technical knowledge that helped her. He had three college degrees, but they were all in the liberal arts. He also studied astrophysics, played in the Marching Band, and earned an MBA. She said that she could have gotten the job without the teachers and that Google liked that she was a generalist who could adapt to change and that they felt she had that "goodness" meaning she played well with others.

P.S. I must add that he was only 23 years old, so he had little work experience. Google told him that they are not hiring so much for the initial job as for the potential to become future jobs. Being ambitious, who wants to learn new things and can work well in a team is very important to your corporate culture.

PPS. To update. He just got his first promotion and a big raise. I still pay for dinner, because that's what dads do.

My case was easy. My first attempts were useless. But then Josh Bloch archived my resume and it worked. By the way, I had the best interview on Google. Ok, second best; I had good at Takt and Salesforce. Anyway, pretty good, kind, good questions and the ability to understand and accept an answer that is not from a textbook.

Of course, there is a "hiring committee", which makes its decisions based on strange suggestions and assumptions; so it's kind of a lottery. They won't hire you as soon as they suspect you weren't sincere enough. For example, two interviewers give you the same problem. And you don't

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My case was easy. My first attempts were useless. But then Josh Bloch archived my resume and it worked. By the way, I had the best interview on Google. Ok, second best; I had good at Takt and Salesforce. Anyway, pretty good, kind, good questions and the ability to understand and accept an answer that is not from a textbook.

Of course, there is a "hiring committee", which makes its decisions based on strange suggestions and assumptions; so it's kind of a lottery. They won't hire you as soon as they suspect you weren't sincere enough. For example, two interviewers give you the same problem. And you don't tell the second that you've solved it. You failed.

They hired me for my looks.

Because they were hiring.

I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain position.

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I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain role. They are really smart. It's not just about your knowledge and skills, it's also about how well you perform in that position.

2 - Is the Google interview process very difficult?

Yes and No. It depends. It will depend on the interviewer, recruiter and how long the position has been open, how quickly they need someone for the position, and the skills of other candidates. Some interviewers want to hire a copy of themselves and in this case, no matter how good you are, if you don't share the same style and personality as the hiring manager, you won't get the job.

3 - Most of the time they have someone in mind for the role.

I can explain that in more detail later, but at Google they need to interview multiple people for a position. Sometimes they loved the first candidate and when you showed up for the interview they already fell in love with someone else. However, they are still obliged to interview the other candidates and sometimes they will do it very badly because they see it as a waste of time. In cases like that, you will probably walk out of the interview feeling like you won't get the job.

4 - Are you always looking to hire the best candidate?

Not always. There are a lot of insider recommendations for roles, and unless the person someone referred you is really bad and you're incredibly good at what you do, chances are you won't get the role.

Google is the company where I saw the highest number of Googlers friends, husbands, wives, boyfriends, girlfriends, brothers and sisters hired. In my team, at least 25% of the people have a family member or someone very close who works at Google.

5 - Heart rate can be very lazy

You have to think in terms of supply and demand to understand the recruitment process at Google. They have hundreds, sometimes thousands of people applying for a position on Google. They don't need to scout for talent (although most of the time they do), they already have millions of people wanting to work for them.

For that reason, recruiters are sometimes really disorganized and don't care much about you and can't send you enough information that you will need to perform well in the interview.

But that is not the rule. I believe that most of the time they do a decent job and in their defense they receive thousands of applications a month, 95% of the time from people who are not suitable for the position.

6 - You need to be lucky

I have a friend at Google who said that his technical interview questions were very similar to the questions he had been practicing in a book on technical interview questions. He was fortunate to be prepared to answer all the questions correctly and faster. I know another guy who is really normal, but who worked with a Googler at an agency and when a position became available they recommended him for the position.

You have to keep in mind that the hiring process in Google is not perfect. I think there is a lot of decision-making power in the hiring manager's hand.

7 - There are many average people

One thing you hear a lot during your first few months at Google is about imposter syndrome. Google has amazing people working for them and some of the brightest people I had the pleasure of working with I met at Google. However, there are also many average people. What you don't see is anyone below average. Everyone has at least enough skills to do a reasonable job. I think Google is good at providing a fertile environment for personal growth. It also challenges you to keep improving, but still, there are some folks who are happy enough to be on Google and not worried about improvement.

8 - Non-technical roles

Non-technical roles are the most difficult because it is difficult to establish the correct success metrics for a candidate. Technical roles are easier because 70% of the process is to show that you have great skills and your methods to solve a problem.

When it comes to non-technical roles it is very easy to get a false positive. It's not hard to cheat the process if you're really good at interviewing or the hiring manager isn't very skilled either. I worked for a large, well-known company where the team leader was not really trained and unprepared for his role, but his manager (the department director) was also untrained and unprepared. So if you're applying for a position where hiring managers are bad at what they do, chances are they will hire someone just as bad as they are. In my case, I was hired because someone else with great influence in the company decided that I was the right candidate.

9 - Googleness

You hear a lot about Googleness, but I think that as long as you don't do something really awkward or unprofessional during the interview, Googleness isn't that important. Googleness is a "metric" that shows how apt you are to work in the Google environment.

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