Why are so many people who, being fired, ignore all the reasons why they are fired?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Iker Benjamin



Why are so many people who, being fired, ignore all the reasons why they are fired?

Some employers are not aware of what their state requires regarding this and therefore do not follow laws and regulations which, among other things, require an employer to advise the employee and write them down so that there is any trace of Verifiable role if the employee is subsequently fired. That can make a difference in whether they are eligible for unemployment. With some companies, the HR department takes care of this and will sometimes choose not to because in some way you can legally disagree with them and maybe be sued later in some way depending on the situation and by what the person is firm.

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Some employers are not aware of what their state requires regarding this and therefore do not follow laws and regulations which, among other things, require an employer to advise the employee and write them down so that there is any trace of Verifiable role if the employee is subsequently fired. That can make a difference in whether they are eligible for unemployment. With some companies, the HR department takes care of this and will sometimes choose not to because it can somehow put them at odds legally and be sued maybe later in some way depending on the situation and why the person is fired or is going to be fired. In fact, I worked for a company that didn't care and laid off people all the time until I started working running their business. It was a bar and grill owned by a famous tennis player with three other partners and they hired and laid off more than 100 employees in one year. They couldn't understand why their unemployment tax was 9% instead of the 2-3% it should have been until they hired me and I explained to them that the higher tax was based on turnover and people collecting the unemployment that they fired without driving or documenting. get things right and fire employees for the wrong reasons. That higher tax rate was costing them nearly two thousand dollars a month instead of the five hundred or so it should have cost them. They couldn't understand why their unemployment tax was 9% instead of the 2-3% it should have been until they hired me and I explained to them that the higher tax was based on turnover and people collecting the unemployment that they fired without driving or documenting. get things right and fire employees for the wrong reasons. That higher tax rate was costing them nearly two thousand dollars a month instead of the five hundred or so it should have cost them. They couldn't understand why their unemployment tax was 9% instead of the 2-3% it should have been until they hired me and I explained to them that the higher tax was based on turnover and people collecting the unemployment that they fired without driving or documenting. get things right and fire employees for the wrong reasons. That higher tax rate was costing them nearly two thousand dollars a month instead of the five hundred or so it should have cost them.

There are also bad supervisors and bad bosses who don't communicate with their employees, among other things. Sometimes there are also those who try but are not good communicators and then there are also employees who do not always listen and follow what is said or what is said to them. So sometimes there is a communication problem regarding this. In fact, I was fired from a job and I even told the owner that it was not me who was doing certain things, but this other manager and he did not believe me. Two weeks later the owner called me and apologized after realizing it was the other manager and not me, and hired me again with a raise after firing the other manager.

One of the reasons I was successful in my own business, in addition to having a successful career in the military, was that I was always a good communicator with those who worked with and for me. I found that this was key to helping others work and managing, as well as developing a relationship with them where they wanted to work and do their best. Not all bosses and supervisors get to that point as they should, is what I see these days.

People tend to suffer from basal integrity syndrome, which means they think

Late + Good excuse = punctual

late is late. Lies are lies. Mistakes are mistakes. But instead of being self-aware and applying simple honesty, they compare the magnitude of their misbehavior to that of others and rationalize: "I was 20 minutes late but Susie missed a deadline so I should be free." . Or even worse, "My boss is late, why shouldn't I?"

Even when people get more than 3 warnings for insubordination / upward delegation, they rationalize: "I was busy." Or "I didn't think they would care." "She seemed calm about it."

Yes

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People tend to suffer from basal integrity syndrome, which means they think

Late + Good excuse = punctual

late is late. Lies are lies. Mistakes are mistakes. But instead of being self-aware and applying simple honesty, they compare the magnitude of their misbehavior to that of others and rationalize: "I was 20 minutes late but Susie missed a deadline so I should be free." . Or even worse, "My boss is late, why shouldn't I?"

Even when people get more than 3 warnings for insubordination / upward delegation, they rationalize: "I was busy." Or "I didn't think they would care." "She seemed calm about it."

If you are my waiter in a haute cuisine restaurant and I ask you for food and drink or prices and you tell me: “The water is there. I don't know how much a BLT costs, look in the side menu and do the math. I couldn't bring her order before I left early because it was busy. "

Would you expect to be fired? Would the fact that a customer was willing to go get their own drinks or seemed "cool" about not getting their food convince you that your boss's warning wasn't a big deal?

Not likely, but in office environments people rationalize unacceptable performance in this exact way. I even said to one person, "You are risking your job by badmouthing your boss in text messages and he is the person monitoring the messages." When the person was fired after more than 20 warnings for various things, such as disappearing for hours during a shift and lying with a daring expression several times in front of groups, they were completely shocked.

Denial of reality is often the reason why employer and employee separate. The employee who is laid off generally wants to believe that the layoff was done prematurely, personally, or was simply not justified. Those who make more obvious mistakes like constant tardiness, no production, or personal problems generally accept their fate, but some don't.

I do not think they are strangers. More than likely they will realize that choosing the right environment to be sure that you can thrive better is even more important than simply choosing a paycheck. Employers are also unaware of employee preferences and possible fit with their current culture. It comes down to the environment that must adapt to the individual.

If you continue to do something wrong, you either ignore it or don't have the self-control to correct it. In other words, if the shooting is their fault, not realizing the problem would be one of the reasons they allowed it to continue.

Well, in right-to-work states, you may never be told the reason for your dismissal. In fact, a reason is optional.

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