Why are human resources departments so useless?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Archie Cunningham



Why are human resources departments so useless?

Thanks for the response request James Carlson!

I don't blame you for thinking this way. From an outsider's perspective, it only makes sense. The logic is as follows:

YES Human Resources is not hiring people

THEN Human Resources must be useless

The problem is in the premise. In other words, HR is in charge of hiring people. This is an incorrect assumption. If the assumption that HR hires people were true, then the hiring manager would have no say in the hiring process, they would simply be given a team that they would be forced to deal with. The fact is that managers have the responsibility

Keep reading

Thanks for the response request James Carlson!

I don't blame you for thinking this way. From an outsider's perspective, it only makes sense. The logic is as follows:

YES Human Resources is not hiring people

THEN Human Resources must be useless

The problem is in the premise. In other words, HR is in charge of hiring people. This is an incorrect assumption. If the assumption that HR hires people were true, then the hiring manager would have no say in the hiring process, they would simply be given a team that they would be forced to deal with. The fact is, managers have a responsibility to manage well. It wouldn't make much sense for a company to invest hundreds of thousands of dollars in someone with specialized skill (people managing, assigning budgets, negotiating) and then ask them to perform a task they are unfamiliar with (search for candidates or understand the laws federal). In fact, it would be counterintuitive to the overall purpose of the business to make a profit.


So if HR doesn't hire people, what do they do?

I won't tell you everything I learned in my master's degree, but if you want a short HR synopsis, look here. In regards to recruiting specifically, I can go into a little more detail.

  1. Does the company follow government guidelines and not discriminate against specific minority groups through the Affirmative Action Plan?
  2. It is a specific hiring manager who demonstrates a bias that prevents the most qualified candidate from being hired for the position. Diversity creates more new ideas and announcements for productivity.
  3. Are the interview processes the ones that introduce the most qualified candidates, and not just the hiring manager's friends?
  4. Candidate tracking system management
  5. Train hiring managers on how to conduct interviews.
  6. Determine the job posting boards that offer the best return on investment relative to the most qualified candidates for cost.

Based on the things I just taught you, here is a thought experiment for you to consider:

What if the HR department ceased to exist and all candidates chose to use the same process as you?

From the candidates' perspective, that would be great! They wouldn't need to spend hours and hours filling out tedious cover letters, resumes, and then again entering the same information back into the applicant tracking system. You could meet your boss and your coworkers even before you start working. You may not even need an interview with the company. Perfect, right?

Now think about the business perspective. Hiring managers would receive hundreds of phone calls and emails from people every day, each of them wanting to sit down for coffee just to meet the manager. Instead of doing the job the employee was hired for, the manager would schedule countless appointments with the people he liked the most. Unknown from the illegal questions. they would hire someone who was more like them. Qualified but angry minorities would sue the company for unfair hiring practices. The company now has a manager who is not doing his job and millions of potential dollars to pay in resolving legal disputes.

Keep in mind that everything discussed thus far doesn't even consider the reasons the government instituted the laws it has in the first place, or what the nation would be like without these laws.

When you look at things from a holistic perspective, you will see that Human Resources does not add value to a company by generating income up front, but through the application of research and compliance with government standards.


In a nutshell

Companies are not spending money on a department that is not adding value.

AND

The experience of a candidate's application is not as high a priority for the company as it is for the applicant.

If you are interested, you can join my Facebook group to learn more about resumes, interviews and to find the job you deserve.

I have met some very nice people who, sadly, are HR professionals. I say that sadly, as in my experience in the last 20 years of work, HR is pretty useless. At the end of the day, staff want to be paid correctly, on time, and company profits to be managed correctly. That doesn't require an entire human resources department, just one or two people.

In many cases, HR is there to support the company, not the employees. I don't care what the various HR professionals think in this thread, but their role adds nothing. Suggest that you are on par with other departments that are pa

Keep reading

I have met some very nice people who, sadly, are HR professionals. I say that sadly, as in my experience in the last 20 years of work, HR is pretty useless. At the end of the day, staff want to be paid correctly, on time, and company profits to be managed correctly. That doesn't require an entire human resources department, just one or two people.

In many cases, HR is there to support the company, not the employees. I don't care what the various HR professionals think in this thread, but their role adds nothing. Suggesting that you are on par with other departments that are part of strategic planning is a joke. Most HR tasks can be easily outsourced, telling you how much real value they bring.

Here are some examples of how HR has been completely useless and shady every time I've dealt with them:

(1) While working for a larger retailer, in the Finance Department, our department was doing a remodel of furniture, carpets, etc. HR decided to hold some focus group meetings, to ask for our opinions, with the promise that what was shared during these meetings would not have any impact on our future with the company and any possible job promotion. So, naively, I believed them and told them that my team's desks were pretty old, chipped, and uneven. Outcome? I couldn't even make a sideways move because HR refused to enforce the promise that we wouldn't be penalized for sharing our thoughts. I left, as there was no future for me.

(2) working for another company, I joined them after they did their annual Employee Satisfaction Survey. Finance tends to score low on these, but we divide into focus groups nonetheless. I learned my lesson from the first example, so I kept quiet. A colleague shared her thoughts on why Finance scored low: utter disregard for work-life balance, inability to take vacations, etc. She had been employed for more than 10 years. Two weeks later she was fired for incompetence.

(3) I was working for a housing association, my manager was bullying me. He told me that I smelled, that I was fat, that my mother thought that I was so fat, he accused me of lying, demanded that I go to the office Christmas party, demanded that I attend a former colleague who was going to lunch. She was well known in the office for her arrogance, lack of skill, and her ways of bullying. I filed a formal complaint. HR's response after your investigation? There is no evidence of harassment in the office. His investigation consisted of questioning my manager ... that was it. He had provided documentation, names of who else had suffered ... not a single person was interviewed. I leave. And karma bit their butt, as that manager was fired and the human resources person in charge of my complaint was fired as well.

Never trust HR. As long as you get paid on time, working conditions are decent (and the Health and Safety, Facilities and Legal departments can guarantee it) and you get your vacation, that's all you need.

Bradley and Paul gave excellent answers. You can see that some HR folks are upset with this, but they are getting the clear story from them. And you can see that some internal non-HR companies (including, unfortunately, often training people, who often belong to HR but resent your intrusion) agree with you. HR gets a bad rap from many and there are definitely poor HR people and poor HR departments.

However, judging HR by hiring is bad judgment. It is the process with which they have the greatest challenge and the least authority. In HR you must select hundreds of candidates to select the two or three

Keep reading

Bradley and Paul gave excellent answers. You can see that some HR folks are upset with this, but they are getting the clear story from them. And you can see that some internal non-HR companies (including, unfortunately, often training people, who often belong to HR but resent your intrusion) agree with you. HR gets a bad rap from many and there are definitely poor HR people and poor HR departments.

However, judging HR by hiring is bad judgment. It is the process with which they have the greatest challenge and the least authority. In HR, you have to select hundreds of candidates to select the two or three "best" of all the resumes you get and send those resumes to the manager who will actually do the hiring, who will make the decision. That buries HR on paper, which takes time to sort through, at which point the hiring manager has been looking on their own, talking to peers in industry associations, getting recommendations from here, there, and everywhere. and interviewing on their own even though the The 'theoretical' route is that they interview the three people whose resumes come from the HR process.

Meanwhile, every book on how to do a job search cites the very clear fact that 80% of jobs are found on networks (talking to everyone you know until you meet someone who knows of a person who is hiring and pass your name on). Only 20% of jobs are obtained by applying in writing, online, by submitting resumes, etc. You fall in the 80%, no wonder. You spoke to someone face-to-face, which is what we tell every job seeker trying to do and / or someone you met face-to-face recommended someone else to you (probably face-to-face).

When we posted jobs, we often got 1000 or more resumes. No one could meet all those people face to face. Our team quickly scanned based on typical job requirements given to us by the hiring manager. Often times when we presented what seemed to be the 'top three resumes' to that manager, he or she would say one of two things: 1. Oh, but I just met the perfect candidate, referred by my brother-in-Law, my Former coworker who is now on Competitor X or, I'm not kidding, the guy who was sitting next to me on my last business plane trip and we got talking (which usually applies to vice presidential candidates) .. Or 2. well, I looked at those resumes, but they didn't have X, Y or Z,

I used to describe HR hiring as the worst part of HR to do, the most prone to doing the wrong thing, never having enough information to do it completely right, having a success rate of about 50-50. I'm definitely among those who always tell job seekers not to apply in writing, online, or by submitting resumes first if they can find any way to get online (which is bypassing HR). It's not the people, but the way the system is set up. HR does a million things, many of them very, very well in most cases, but hiring is not something they have the power or the role to do well for. Their job there is to filter thousands of resumes in search of what they have been told to select,

So HR is useless, not usually, rarely at 80% or 90% of what they are supposed to do, but in hiring ... yes, unfortunately often in what it concerns the candidates.

In my years I have discovered that HR leadership positions are filled with people who are capable of, and will not hesitate to be, extremely false and misleading.

On the one hand, naive workers think they are like a friendly aunt you can turn to when you have problems, and on the other hand, they have a responsibility to the corporation to make sure that problem workers are not a problem. In other words, when you entrust your secrets to your hiring manager, you are telling the last person in the world that you need to tell.

Characters who have to keep up with these two faces tend to be destructive.

Keep reading

In my years I have discovered that HR leadership positions are filled with people who are capable of, and will not hesitate to be, extremely false and misleading.

On the one hand, naive workers think they are like a friendly aunt you can turn to when you have problems, and on the other hand, they have a responsibility to the corporation to make sure that problem workers are not a problem. In other words, when you entrust your secrets to your hiring manager, you are telling the last person in the world that you need to tell.

Characters who have to keep up with these two faces tend to be destructive rather than creative, dishonest rather than honest, and will strictly follow policies and procedures to the letter when it suits them, or the spirit of procedure if not. written to your liking. his objectives.

HR managers have to help design the firing of whistleblowers or pregnant women, because they have to make it appear that the company has acted within the law, even when they know it has not. The same character will be in the interviews for replacements and will tell the candidates how wonderful this company is, and how ethical it is, etc.

I can't guess why you had your experience, but consider this: I was once recruiting for a job and it was very difficult to find good candidates. In the end we got one, but he wanted £ 500 a year more than our budget. The HR manager refused to authorize the job offer due to the £ 500, even though the candidate's salary came from my department budget. I indicated to HR that it would cost £ 1500 JUST READVING THE POSITION and they told me I was 'being annoying'. I was not allowed to discuss it further. That hiring manager, and no hiring manager I've ever met, has ever had any concept of a connection between productive work and the money they waste on lawyers and pointless nonsense.

No, not bitter, but tell it like it is.

For the stupidity of the business world. It does NOT make sense for hiring decisions to be made by HR people who have NO idea what the positions actually entail. Almost everyone who has ever gone through an interview process understands it.

The people who should be in charge of hiring are those who would be managing that person. Because they are the ones who know what the company needs for the position, and they would be the ones who would work with the person, NOT with the HR person. It's a no-brainer, no matter how much body babbling is used to cover up this simple and obvious fact.

It is

Keep reading

For the stupidity of the business world. It does NOT make sense for hiring decisions to be made by HR people who have NO idea what the positions actually entail. Almost everyone who has ever gone through an interview process understands it.

The people who should be in charge of hiring are those who would be managing that person. Because they are the ones who know what the company needs for the position, and they would be the ones who would work with the person, NOT with the HR person. It's a no-brainer, no matter how much body babbling is used to cover up this simple and obvious fact.

It's not just the candidates who suffer, the employers, whose hiring deadlines are lengthened, budgets are cut and whose positions are filled by someone who is not the best person for the position, who suffer so much.

HR should be limited to managing benefits, payroll issues, etc., in other words, those things that they are trained and competent at. And the vast majority of hiring managers are perfectly happy doing the rest. When HR managers are involved in the hiring process, the financial loss incurred from inappropriate matches, not to mention colossal bureaucratic overhead, can probably be measured in the tens of billions, if not more. HR has gone from performing useful functions that allow companies to run smoothly and keep their workers happy and healthy, to being a parasitic and counterproductive drain on the global economy.

It's time to end the HR industry's dialogue in the hiring process, and everyone from employees to managers to HR themselves will be much better off.

The Human Resources Department is as useless as you think! That said, let's try to find valid reasons to say so. I will try to name a few to understand better.

  • The HR you see in the cafeteria all day are probably having one-on-one discussions. Sometimes that may be related to a project or an evaluation, but you think HR doesn't have better jobs than spending time in coffee shops. Another reason HRs (women) are foul-mouthed when seen with multiple men.
  • Have you seen HR yelling / arguing similar to your project? No matter how difficult it is, we try to be nice to the employees.
  • When you are angry you hit yourself
Keep reading

The Human Resources Department is as useless as you think! That said, let's try to find valid reasons to say so. I will try to name a few to understand better.

  • The HR you see in the cafeteria all day are probably having one-on-one discussions. Sometimes that may be related to a project or an evaluation, but you think HR doesn't have better jobs than spending time in coffee shops. Another reason HRs (women) are foul-mouthed when seen with multiple men.
  • Have you seen HR yelling / arguing similar to your project? No matter how difficult it is, we try to be nice to the employees.
  • When he's angry, he hits his keyboard as he handles his laptop. Imagine what will happen if my resources (you guys) hit. HR is the only team that talks about people rather than processes.
  • If there are 100, the policy says 30 for the business, 50 for the project, 15 for overhead and contingencies, another 5 will go to HR. Note that we are last in line, although we are the face of the organization.
  • You may think that HR is not paying you enough. Sorry!! We have been advised to pay only for what has been discussed. At the time of negotiation, we will be happy to offer you more walking, but we must be in line with the policies.
  • Whoever says HR has no better job than interviewing people seriously needs HR cross training. Contact me, I will be of great help.
  • If I have to represent in numbers, it has an assigned HR, but there will be between 200 and 400 people assigned to each HR. Talk about equality now, silly.

I don't need to convince anyone that we even WORK because I AM NOT A SALESMAN TO CONVINCE YOU - From an HR employee.

In some companies, the HR department performs a wide variety of tasks, payroll, hiring and interviews, some office management, "pastoral care", and so on. In other companies they may do much less.

I have worked in companies where the HR department can be very good and a powerful force for the benefit of the staff. I have also worked in companies where HR is a total waste, for example, in hiring they are so ineffective that good candidates are left adrift after successful interviews.

If you are applying for a job and the HR department seems useless, walk away, because the HR department may turn around.

Keep reading

In some companies, the HR department performs a wide variety of tasks, payroll, hiring and interviews, some office management, "pastoral care", and so on. In other companies they may do much less.

I have worked in companies where the HR department can be very good and a powerful force for the benefit of the staff. I have also worked in companies where HR is a total waste, for example, in hiring they are so ineffective that good candidates are left adrift after successful interviews.

If you are applying for a job and the HR department seems pointless, walk away, because the HR department can turn a good job into a bad experience!

The strangest experience I had with a human resources department was last November.

I had seen an interesting job at an interesting company on their website, with an email address included for applications. I sent a cover letter asking for more information. They didn't respond, so I found them on LinkedIn, connected with someone in HR and asked if the job was still open and if they had received my application, and the answer was yes and yes. CV. I did so and after a while asked about progress, but they were still waiting for someone from the company to process my application. I don't know why I bothered to continue.

Meanwhile, he sent me a form that required me to enter high school subjects and test results (from 35 years ago!) And other completely irrelevant things. I was puzzled, even feeling a bit insulted by the irrelevance, but I kept going, wondering if they were buying time.

I then asked the HR person if he could state the salary range for the job, and also which of his two locations the job was in. She replied that they would not provide that information until she went to the interview!

It was evident that it was all a complete waste of time, so I replied that I was withdrawing my application and that they please delete my CV (resume) from their records. I did not receive any reply.

Meanwhile, while looking at the company's profile on LinkedIn, I read one of its director's profiles and LI had notified him of my visit. So he must have read my profile and invited me to apply for that job! I told him that I had already submitted an application but nothing had come out, he replied that he would nudge HR. Shortly after, I got the above HR answer with the stupid form. After telling HR that I would be retiring, I told the director that I would be retiring. He replied that he was sorry, but he didn't ask why, and I thought there was no point in telling him.

I checked, and more than six months later the job was still open on their website and on LinkedIn.

To update:

A few years later, in late 2019, I was reminded of the company when I ran into one of its employees at a sandwich shop. Out of curiosity, I looked at the company's LinkedIn connections and found evidence that they had filled the position six months after I first contacted them.

Human resources are not useless, they are very useful. In this article we have mentioned the use of the human resources department. If you want to know how important the HR department is? Find them by Google search as "Zoe Talent Solutions".

The 6 priorities of human resources today

HUMAN RESOURCES

Today we want to focus the attention of our post on the importance of adaptation and recycling that Human Resources departments should have in the face of a changing market in practically all aspects.

New technologies surround us and with them arise innovative tools and needs (Tweet This) not only in company

Keep reading

Human resources are not useless, they are very useful. In this article we have mentioned the use of the human resources department. If you want to know how important the HR department is? Find them by Google search as "Zoe Talent Solutions".

The 6 priorities of human resources today

HUMAN RESOURCES

Today we want to focus the attention of our post on the importance of adaptation and recycling that Human Resources departments should have in the face of a changing market in practically all aspects.

New technologies surround us and with them, innovative tools and needs arise (Tweet This) not only in companies but also in the way of managing and caring for people, which is really the objective of any Human Resources department worth its salt.

Until recently we talked about managing and directing people efficiently to empathize with the objectives of the company, however, and more and more we have to add words, care, pamper, motivate and build loyalty. Why are they so important?

Well, precisely because we are dealing with people and that unquestionably involves emotions. The key is knowing how to properly manage these emotions so that they are in favor of the company and not against it.

Let's take an example:

There are many companies whose sole objective is focused on optimal customer service and expansion of their products or services in various markets. To do this, these companies invest a large amount of resources in marketing and distribution strategies.

At first glance they may seem like a very successful attitude, but who are the ones who are going to achieve full customer satisfaction as well as optimal performance in market diversification? Well, the workers, that is, the people who form work teams in this company.

It will be very difficult to achieve these results if we have unmotivated, apathetic teams with little commitment to the organization.

Therefore, the first step for Human Resources departments will be to focus on people to apply the correct strategies (Tweet This). What should be the priorities of Human Resources departments?

Based on data collected by the Michael Page Barometer, priorities should focus on the following:

1. Creation of a corporate culture

Ideally, candidates should come to the company of their own free will attracted not only by a good external corporate image but also by an interesting place to work.

To achieve this, multiple strategies can be used that join forces towards the loyalty of the workers that the company already has, since they will be the best weapon of viralization and recruitment of new candidates.

2. Compensation and benefits plans

Different realities imply different needs. Today and after various studies it has been shown that one of the things that workers value the most is time (Tweet This). This means that any company that wants to obtain and retain talent must apply reconciliation policies.

Nowadays, more and more companies are striving to obtain the family conciliation certificate that offers a large number of benefits to staff such as compensation for overtime, more respectful hours, inclusion in health policies, family assistance, etc.

3. Performance management

We have also talked on other occasions about the importance of measuring our own results as a Human Resources department at the end of each of our strategies: a selection and hiring process, specific training, a specific plan, etc.

Although it is a topic of increasing relevance, approximately 23% of organizations claim not to have any tool or KPI that offers accurate results of their actions (Tweet This). This is then a weakness that we must continue to work on.

4. Search and talent

Nearly 50% of HR managers say finding qualified candidates is complex (Tweet This). Therefore, to facilitate their search and attraction, we must make use of all kinds of channels and sources of recruitment.

The analysis in order of priority would be as follows:

They lead 91% of online job offers, followed by 84% who prioritize corporate websites. In third place are external selection consultants with 83%. Of course, we must not underestimate the potential of the most massive Social Networks (63%) as well as the references that the employees themselves can contribute (62%).

There is also a lot of talk lately about the Employer Branding Campaigns (52%) as a successful novelty.

5. Employee training and development

Until recently it was believed that the employee had to bring all the training and preparation from abroad, so they would be willing with some guidelines to join their work immediately after their arrival.

However, this is one of the most important factors today due to its strong relationship with commitment. When a person arrives at the company, they do not seek stagnation in their career, but projection, evolution, development, and this is achieved through continuous training and personified plans.

If we do it correctly, it will be the worker who wants to stay in the company, viralize positive comments about it and in this way a business culture is created.

6. Introduction and new tools 2.0

As we commented at the beginning of the text, new technologies have come not only to stay but to continue evolving until we still do not know very well where, although the trend is infinite.

Therefore it is more than obvious that we must incorporate them into the day to day of any department including, of course, Human Resources.

In addition, the correct point of view to see them is as allies and not as enemies since they come to facilitate daily work a lot.

Competitive compensation, along with quality continuing education and respect for the worker's personal life, stand as indisputable keys to success in terms of prioritizing Human Resources departments.

I will give you some examples

Case 1:

Let's say an organization is not doing well financially and is losing business and credibility. The leadership decides to restrict promotions for the financial year. HR is asked to convey this to employees.

Case 2:

A manufacturing unit of an Indian company is taken over by a multinational. Employees of Indian companies have to accept a lower salary than the current salary or else they will have to resign. The HR is responsible for executing this decision.

Case 3:

A young man dies while working near the oven. The human resources department has to pass this on to their parents who are staying

Keep reading

I will give you some examples

Case 1:

Let's say an organization is not doing well financially and is losing business and credibility. The leadership decides to restrict promotions for the financial year. HR is asked to convey this to employees.

Case 2:

A manufacturing unit of an Indian company is taken over by a multinational. Employees of Indian companies have to accept a lower salary than the current salary or else they will have to resign. The HR is responsible for executing this decision.

Case 3:

A young man dies while working near the oven. The human resources department has to convey this to his parents who are staying far from that city.

I have another very simple example. Imagine a guy who cheats on his girlfriend and doesn't realize it. A friend breaks the news to him. At some point you would blame your friend responsible for breaking the news, if he / she hadn't, they would have gotten married.

I'm not saying that we have all the difficult things, but it is human nature to remember the bad things and forget the good things.

HR's job is to Watch, Negotiate. For ex. We need a police force to control the situation, to keep the peace in the city, but it is almost impossible to keep everyone in society happy.

They act as agents of change, policy makers. Changing / improving policies / processes affects employees. It takes time for the change to seep in. (We) humans hate "change." It is almost impossible to keep everyone happy and satisfied in any organization.

HR does not contribute directly to the business (unless you work as a consultant), so a general concept is that they are cost centers of an organization and a support function; However, HR is a corporate and strategic function and just as important as other functions such as project management, marketing, etc. .

I hope I have answered your question.

Interesting comment! Human resources departments often represent the company and the leadership for which they work. If you were actually hired because employees knew you (due to your good networking skills) and didn't have to pass the normal tests and interviews, maybe that's the norm at your company and HR doesn't feel empowered to do. your own work. You could be irritable and useless if you worked a job like that too.

Your company culture could also be to hire people recommended by existing employees if they have the skills. I've seen that approach before and it usually results in good employees. That

Keep reading

Interesting comment! Human resources departments often represent the company and the leadership for which they work. If you were actually hired because employees knew you (due to your good networking skills) and didn't have to pass the normal tests and interviews, maybe that's the norm at your company and HR doesn't feel empowered to do. your own work. You could be irritable and useless if you worked a job like that too.

Your company culture could also be to hire people recommended by existing employees if they have the skills. I've seen that approach before and it generally results in good employees. However, it is very frustrating for people who do not know someone in the company yet.

Bottom line: networking is always a good skill and you should stick with it! Glad you got the job you wanted! Now that you're hired, you may be able to improve on some of the HR practices that weren't helpful and find out why HR wasn't helpful to you. If so, let us know.

When I first moved into general management and had a 150-person department working for me, I discovered that I had an HR manager (we didn't have HR business partners in those days, too sophisticated) and with the benefit of the complete ignorance. he wondered why. I had never been particularly impressed by HR departments, although I knew some great HR people.

It was a steep learning curve, but it was really worth it as I discovered the enormous difficulties HR departments have. They are part of the administration, so the staff resents them. They keep telling management uncomfortable facts, so

Keep reading

When I first moved into general management and had a 150-person department working for me, I discovered that I had an HR manager (we didn't have HR business partners in those days, too sophisticated) and with the benefit of the complete ignorance. he wondered why. I had never been particularly impressed by HR departments, although I knew some great HR people.

It was a steep learning curve, but it was really worth it as I discovered the enormous difficulties HR departments have. They are part of the administration, so the staff resents them. They keep telling management about uncomfortable events, which is why management resents them. Not surprisingly, with the conflicts of interest they have to deal with, they are seen as failed.

It didn't stop me from having disagreements with my successive HR managers, and even my HR business partners, but her job was not just to look out for the competing interests of the company and staff, but, as I saw it, stay out of it. from jail. They always did that, and with that understanding, I think I was a much better manager and, I hope, a leader.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.