Why are companies requesting unreasonable work experience for entry-level positions?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Alaysia Wheeler



Why are companies requesting unreasonable work experience for entry-level positions?

This provides the company with presentations containing the best and brightest resumes. Why do you ask?

Simple.

College students who do more than attend college, study, etc., volunteer for various committees, clubs, or charities. It is these same students who obtain an internship at a prestigious company in their chosen field.

The internship is truly a honeymoon between the student and the company. Introduces the student to the business and sets expectations.

I worked for Deloitte. Our interns turned out to be some of the best new hires I've ever come across.

Employee selection

Keep reading

This provides the company with presentations containing the best and brightest resumes. Why do you ask?

Simple.

College students who do more than attend college, study, etc., volunteer for various committees, clubs, or charities. It is these same students who obtain an internship at a prestigious company in their chosen field.

The internship is truly a honeymoon between the student and the company. Introduces the student to the business and sets expectations.

I worked for Deloitte. Our interns turned out to be some of the best new hires I've ever come across.

Employee selection is a long process for some companies that have a long-term vision.

"Unreasonable" work experience only affects those who do not take the initiative to go further.

Of course, there is another perspective to take.

Let's say you're in a dead-end job and decide you want to become a computer programmer (or fill in the blank with the job you want).

There are numerous boot camps, community college programs, and online training or certifications available.

You attend boot camp, work on real projects, build a portfolio of work on github with your name on it.

You have no "experience", but you have proof of knowledge.

This is what companies are looking for. Someone who will go the extra mile.

And, of course, there are some companies that are unreasonable in their demands.

What I have seen are job applications containing "must do" and then "nice" experience points. For example, if I am trying to fill a position on my team for an evaluator of a specific system, the candidate should have experience with the system and perhaps an automated testing tool. It is good to have a Security + certificate (required by the client) or some other certification.

Good luck!

Thanks for the A2A. In general, the more experience you have, the more you have to offer a company, regardless of the position you hold. This is why companies like to have highly experienced employees. It's right. Some people learn more from their experiences than others, so if a company asks for what you consider to be an unreasonable amount of work experience, see if you may have learned specific things from your experience that you can contribute to the company you are looking for. a job. Do some research on the company before applying; that will give you an idea

Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A. In general, the more experience you have, the more you have to offer a company, regardless of the position you hold. This is why companies like to have highly experienced employees. It's right. Some people learn more from their experiences than others, so if a company asks for what you consider to be an unreasonable amount of work experience, see if you may have learned specific things from your experience that you can contribute to the company you are looking for. a job. Do some research on the company before applying; This will give you some ideas of areas of the company where you can use what you have learned from your previous experience (even if that experience is a life experience rather than a work experience).

This is because there are no human resources policies in that company. With the right policy, the HR department would have the correct job description and specification for the candidate, thus eliminating these unreasonable demands from the employer.

One of the points that was not covered is the change in the way the work is done.

Twenty years ago, people who went to business school were trying to become accountants, a good steady job where they could earn a decent income and work through retirement with no problems. Or at least they would like to work in administration, have an office job. The rest would end up as a cashier in supermarkets.

But now there are no jobs available for accountants or in offices. Young graduates with business administration degrees that are a large chunk of every age class don't get any of those jobs.

Automation.

When I started my own company in 2012, we all had

Keep reading

One of the points that was not covered is the change in the way the work is done.

Twenty years ago, people who went to business school were trying to become accountants, a good steady job where they could earn a decent income and work through retirement with no problems. Or at least they would like to work in administration, have an office job. The rest would end up as a cashier in supermarkets.

But now there are no jobs available for accountants or in offices. Young graduates with business administration degrees that are a large chunk of every age class don't get any of those jobs.

Automation.

When I started my own company in 2012 we had all the accounting and salaries handled by a computer system. Our annual financing and administration costs were € 2,000! If you had started a business in 2002, those costs could have been € 10-20,000.

What does that mean? All that expense is the salary someone is earning. For someone who runs a business, it's great that it is no longer necessary to hire one or more accountants. In the past, even small businesses tended to have an accountant and possibly a secretary or two helping the accountant, fixing folders and papers, etc.

But now you can run a business, all papers are permanently stored and secured and available wherever you are in less than 30 seconds. You don't need a secretary to go down to the basement, dust off some old folders and try to find the right paper.

You don't need someone to review accounts and balances.

Everything is automated.

So all those people who did that? They are no longer needed.

And those were just jobs! No skill is needed to put maps in alphabetical order.

And it's not just about business administration and accounting. Many more fields are being automated and we will soon have automated stores (I hope!) Where we don't really need cashiers. The three or four security guards who are employed at all times in a supermarket will now be next to the cash registers trying to look scary so that people do not steal. No new staff will be hired, but tellers are in real danger of disappearing.

There is still telemarketing, but for how long? People who simply read a 45 second article? Within a decade we will have automated smart systems that will be indistinguishable from a typical telemarketer that does its job for minimal cost and with maximum coverage.

People like me were told what we should study in school since we were 14 years old.

But unless you were told to study to become a lawyer, doctor, or psychologist, the advice is likely out of date!

Entire factories are run solely by robots. There are entire warehouses where humans are not allowed to enter because the robots working there cause a danger to humans. All kinds of tasks are automated.

The other day I wrote a code that automated 2 weeks of my work in 30 minutes. In a project I discovered how to do several months of manual work in a couple of days through scripts and macros.

Fewer and fewer people are needed to finish the same jobs.

However, the wages of these fewer and fewer people do not increase and, therefore, the demand for goods and services does not increase at the same rate as productivity increases.

Increases in worker productivity are not manifesting as an increase in workers' wages, but are being invested by corporations outside of Europe.

This means that people whose skills are now obsolete and who do not have any useful skills in the modern economy will not be hired by the service industry to serve the increasingly productive workers in Europe. Instead, they will simply end up unemployed and no one will see the gains from increased productivity.

I, for one, earn perhaps a fifth of the salary of a typical American junior programmer. Which is insane. When the few people who still get to work earn less and less, it can only lead to a contracting economy.

If the workers who still have their jobs earn more, they could employ the unemployed youth through the service industry.

But instead, for example, in Finland we are cutting service industries:

  • fewer teachers per student
  • fewer caregivers per child in daycare
  • fewer nurses per elderly in nursing homes
  • fewer nurses and doctors in hospitals
  • fewer professors in universities

etc.

So we will just have even more unemployment and the situation will only get worse.

Because the private sector is cutting its demand for labor, the public sector is cutting its demand for labor, there is no growth and there is no need for labor and the need for labor will simply continue to shrink as more and more automation is introduced to address declining demand and will lead to further decline in demand and further reduction in the amount of labor to remain competitive and profitable.

It is a race to the bottom in Europe.

If you came to know about the work because it is 'posted' somewhere, then the work is not yours. I don't care if you have an MBA from Wharton, you won't get that job. The hiring manager knows who they want on board on their team BEFORE the ad runs on LinkedIn. The new hire already met with the manager at a dinner somewhere, exchanged contacts, and found out how they can be helpful to each other. The new hire has probably even given their notice to their current employer. Why the ad then? To comply with any intracorporate regulation of equity, equal opportunities, etc.

Keep reading

If you came to know about the work because it is 'posted' somewhere, then the work is not yours. I don't care if you have an MBA from Wharton, you won't get that job. The hiring manager knows who they want on board on their team BEFORE the ad runs on LinkedIn. The new hire already met with the manager at a dinner somewhere, exchanged contacts, and found out how they can be helpful to each other. The new hire has probably even given their notice to their current employer. Why the ad then? To comply with any intracorporate regulation of equity, equal opportunities, etc. Whatever you do, your resume does not go out of the machine, that is, the software filter.

Nobody hires a CV or an online profile anymore. People hire who they know, who they trust, or who have heard great things from someone else they know and trust. Unless you know the guy making the decision, it's actually a "click" on the ad. Thanks for your interest in our company. We wish him the best in his future.

And why such ridiculous requirements in the job advertisement? This is because these are the types of requirements that make the already decided candidate the most suitable. You could probably get the job done without meeting all the specific requirements, or with your experience in a different but relevant business division / platform, etc. However, it does not meet the requirement. The requirement is tailored to you.

My boss hired me through some connections that I don't want to reveal. And after I joined, I found out that there was an advertisement for that position on the employer's website.

Welcome to Graduate Catch-22! You have just spent 3-5 years in college working right now, but you don't have the experience you need for a job. You need a job to get the experience.

  • Intern: Yes, you can actually do an internship after graduating from some companies. Just keep in mind that you won't be paying the bills, but it will help you gain valuable experience.
  • Volunteer - Volunteer your skills at the local charity of your choice. You may not be doing anything but cold calling, but it can definitely help build your customer relationship experience. If you are lucky, you may really be able to develop your skills. I was ab
Keep reading

Welcome to Graduate Catch-22! You have just spent 3-5 years in college working right now, but you don't have the experience you need for a job. You need a job to get the experience.

  • Intern: Yes, you can actually do an internship after graduating from some companies. Just keep in mind that you won't be paying the bills, but it will help you gain valuable experience.
  • Volunteer - Volunteer your skills at the local charity of your choice. You may not be doing anything but cold calling, but it can definitely help build your customer relationship experience. If you are lucky, you may really be able to develop your skills. I was able to create a brochure for a charity and it was an experience that I was able to take advantage of before I was hired.
  • Get an unlikely experience: Did you design a newsletter in college? Did you teach other children? Did you act in a play? All of that can be used as experience in everything from creating a newsletter to public speaking. It won't count like four years of experience, but again, it's something.
  • Update Your Resume - Take a few hours to really update your resume. I have seen many new graduates submit resumes that were just awful. Nothing shows more inexperience than a bad resume. That means there is no goal, no hobby section, and no wasted space. Look online for some inspiration and go for it! Use those power verbs to your advantage.
  • Apply for Entry-Level Jobs - These are jobs you probably think you're too good at. It's okay. Most new graduates think that way too. Once an intern thought he could apply for a directorial position with only 6 months of experience in the field and a college degree. This is really the area to start in when looking for work. You may have already been looking in this area, but you will be surprised at the number of new graduates who are not looking for entry-level positions.
  • Participate in professional groups: If you are in marketing, find a marketing group to participate in. If you're in accounting, find an accounting group to participate in. Start building your relationship with other people in your field and get the networking started.
  • If you are a writer, offer to be a guest blogger; They won't pay you, but you are trying to build your portfolio and gain experience. The more you write, the more you will learn and get your name out there.
  • Develop Your LinkedIn Page - Don't Forget To Use LinkedIn To Your Advantage!
  • Get a retail job - It's best to gain experience in your field, but working a retail job won't necessarily hinder your growth. It can be helpful if you are interning or volunteering to work in retail for extra money. Also, you can usually put a twist on your retail experience, especially if you've been appointed as a manager, to help develop your expertise to a level that catches the attention of the hiring manager.

Whatever you do, don't come back just to get a masters degree. If you think you are struggling to gain experience now, you will really struggle when you have your MBA but no experience. Basically you will need too high a salary for entry level positions (which you need) but too inexperienced for other positions. Also, typically, your future employer will have a college tuition program that will pay for part of that MBA.

In my situation, I was lucky. I had a really great internship that gave me great experience, and I had spent a lot of time in college already working in areas related to the field. However, to get my first job, I needed to improve my skills and show that I had what it took.

True entry-level jobs are just that: entry-level. If you see jobs that require 1-2 years of experience, you are clearly looking in the wrong places.

There are entry-level jobs available from a large number of employers where they only require academic experience. Yes, some will require some level of internship experience, but that is usually 3 months or 6 months total. If you are looking for jobs that require 1-2 years of experience, they are by definition not entry-level.

Part of the difficulty most job seekers face is searching general job boards (you mentioned LinkedIn and Indeed) t

Keep reading

True entry-level jobs are just that: entry-level. If you see jobs that require 1-2 years of experience, you are clearly looking in the wrong places.

There are entry-level jobs available from a large number of employers where they only require academic experience. Yes, some will require some level of internship experience, but that is usually 3 months or 6 months total. If you are looking for jobs that require 1-2 years of experience, they are by definition not entry-level.

Part of the difficulty most job seekers face is searching for general job boards (you mentioned LinkedIn and Indeed) that are geared towards the seasoned job seeker, not the entry level job seeker.

At CollegeGrad.com we specifically target entry-level job seekers. One of the most useful things we offer is a search filter that shows you only entry-level jobs. Or just internships. Yes, you can also search for experienced positions, but we make it easy for you to find entry-level jobs.

Come take a look - Searching for entry-level jobs and internships on our site makes it easy to find entry-level jobs in your area.

You can also review the top entry-level employers on CollegeGrad, exclusive to our site, with a list of the best entry-level employers and the jobs they are hiring.

Good luck with your job search!

My first thought was: No. I would just be wasting the Company's time and yours. ..However, there are exceptions.
Often times, the job description is the "ideal" applicant. It is a short, pre-written narrative, unique to all, that informs the parameters of the work. The human resources department may (or may not) have the authority to substitute ratings.

For example: if the job posting says, "Criminal justice degree required"
and you do not have a college, but twelve years of experience as a deputy sheriff, the college requirement may not apply in light of your experience.
It would be a waste of t

Keep reading

My first thought was: No. I would just be wasting the Company's time and yours. ..However, there are exceptions.
Often times, the job description is the "ideal" applicant. It is a short, pre-written narrative, unique to all, that informs the parameters of the work. The human resources department may (or may not) have the authority to substitute ratings.

For example: if the job posting says, "Criminal justice degree required"
and you do not have a college, but twelve years of experience as a deputy sheriff, the college requirement may not apply in light of your experience.
It would be a waste of time to ask them to waive the education requirement if you are uneducated and inexperienced and simply "want" the job. You would not be qualified, unprepared, not properly licensed, or have the job knowledge to do the job.

Depending on the job offer, there may be other answers. (I'll tell you a little story that he hired me for a job he wanted :)
I had decided that I wanted to be a carpenter and build houses when I retired from the Navy, a job that was very different from anything I had done before. One day I went to the construction site and asked to speak to the "owner" of the company. I told him, "I want to learn to be a carpenter. I will be there every day on time, bring my own tools, do whatever they tell me, work hard, clean at the end of the day and you never have to worry about where I am, or if I am robbing you. I'll work for you for FREE. All I ask in return is that you teach me to be a damn carpenter. " (He stood there with his mouth open) I added: "I have insurance, so I don't need yours, and I'm ready to work right now."

Finally he said, "Take some of that junk over there and build an easel" and walked away. (I later learned that this was my first lesson. He told me 3 months later that this is the first thing every "new employee" has to do ... because, "if you can't build an easel, you sure can't! Build one! home! "LOL)
He came back, looked at my work, reviewed it, apparently approved it, and started my work. I worked 3 days without pay and he guided me all the time. At the end of the third day he said, "AL, I can't do this anymore. You are an excellent carpenter, I have to pay you." (this was Florida 1988) said, "I want to give you ten bucks an hour, what do you think of that?" I said "No." (I could see the disappointment in his eyes) He asked me: "How much do you have to earn for me to stay?" so I said forcefully, "My price is FIVE dollars an hour or you can forget it!" (We laugh) I kept working for him while I lived in Florida, I kept learning from him and we are friends to this day. I moved to another state and studied, took and passed the exam,

The point is: where there is Will, there is a way.

Let's say you are applying for a job at the microcenter.

The job is to scan barcodes. What happens when the scanner doesn't work?

Do you call a manager? Does it tell you that there is some kind of override to use? What if the credit card doesn't work? What if there are refunds involved? What happens if they pay with a $ 50.00 bill and the purchase is $ 10.00? How do you know that the bill is not fake?

If you had already worked for Lowe's for 10 years; stop having a child until you are in school, now you are ready to go back to work.

Let's say you are applying for a job. Another person who is 18 years old is also the application.

Keep reading

Let's say you are applying for a job at the microcenter.

The job is to scan barcodes. What happens when the scanner doesn't work?

Do you call a manager? Does it tell you that there is some kind of override to use? What if the credit card doesn't work? What if there are refunds involved? What happens if they pay with a $ 50.00 bill and the purchase is $ 10.00? How do you know that the bill is not fake?

If you had already worked for Lowe's for 10 years; stop having a child until you are in school, now you are ready to go back to work.

Let's say you are applying for a job. Another person who is 18 is also applying, he has never had a cash register. Hiring an 18-year-old will take several days of training. Do you need to pay that person minimum wage and benefits? The training cost you $ 10.00 / hour for the potential employee and maybe $ 20.00 for the person who trained you. Does that mean $ 30.00 / hour for training? Also more for the follow-up time for additional questions?

Hiring an experienced person saves you all those expenses. I have asked HR at General Motors why this is so important (experience $ performance). They say they only want someone who has a history of showing up for work every day. Lots of expenses and headaches trying to cover up for someone who doesn't show up. At General Motors, with a thousand people per shift, replacing specific skills is a headache. Replacements are better trained people who can do everything.

Previous experience and proven reliability are important.

Skills and competence.

The skills necessary to acquire a job are not the skills necessary to perform that job. You do not believe me? Look at Congress (or Parliament). It is full of people who can get a job and cannot.

You must demonstrate not only the will, but also the enthusiasm to use the talents and skills you already have on your specific problems. You should be eager to improve them and acquire all the skills and talents they need that you don't have yet, and you don't even know what they are yet. You have to really care about that company and its future, or at least that department.

Keep reading

Skills and competence.

The skills necessary to acquire a job are not the skills necessary to perform that job. You do not believe me? Look at Congress (or Parliament). It is full of people who can get a job and cannot.

You must demonstrate not only the will, but also the enthusiasm to use the talents and skills you already have on your specific problems. You should be eager to improve them and acquire all the skills and talents they need that you don't have yet, and you don't even know what they are yet. You have to really care about that company and its future, or at least that department and its mission.

Finally, you must show that you are better "fit" for that job than the other two hundred who want to do it too. That means communicating naturally and easily with decision makers, being the kind of person they expect (and no, they won't tell you what that is, as they probably won't know either).

To do?

Have something to show: a portfolio, software, a letter from someone who has hired you before, a recommendation from a teacher, anything. What works best will depend on the job, of course.

Don't expect to change them or the world. Don't be too good. It is entry level. They all have low expectations. Exceeding those expectations causes internal friction for them and they will throw away your resume.

Finally, maybe you find a startup or even start your own company. The hours are long, the pay is miserable, and you'll likely be broke, but the potential payoff is staggering.

Try a bachelor's degree and two years of prior experience required to run the cash register at a McDonald's:


Four years of college just so you can ask, "Do you want fries with that?"

EDIT: Try and imagine what only the exorbitant demands of this corporation (in terms of job qualifications) have done to degrade the overall value of an otherwise expensive college degree.

Now, multiply that by the fact that student loan debt exceeds all American credit card debt. Existing student loan debt also exceeds all US auto loan debt combined.

The bird

Keep reading

Try a bachelor's degree and two years of prior experience required to run the cash register at a McDonald's:


Four years of college just so you can ask, "Do you want fries with that?"

EDIT: Try and imagine what only the exorbitant demands of this corporation (in terms of job qualifications) have done to degrade the overall value of an otherwise expensive college degree.

Now, multiply that by the fact that student loan debt exceeds all American credit card debt. Existing student loan debt also exceeds all US auto loan debt combined.

The average American college graduate leaves school with student loan debt of more than $ 30,000. Much of that debt carries over long after age thirty. Remember, even bankruptcy doesn't pay off student loan debt.

Imagine how that discourages these people from critical milestones (and economic stimuli) like buying new cars, getting married, buying a home, or having children. Consider the severely dampening effect these restrictions have on the overall US economy.

This is just a small glimpse of how the ridiculous demands of globalist corporations are slowly strangling the wealth of America's middle class and society at large with their absurd demands for job qualifications.

Why should anyone consume the crappy fast food McDonald's throws up even when that same company devalues ​​and reduces opportunities for young Americans who traditionally served as the backbone of this now abusive and predatory corporate entity?

I just answered a similar question here.

To add to that answer, I will answer your question as an employer who has hired several "entry-level" employees (software developers) in the last few months. In all cases, the candidate we selected had some work experience on their resume. The job may not have been in software development, but it showed they had work experience. In one case, the candidate had around five years of experience as a private tutor (mainly while in college). In another case, the candidate had internship experience, had done freelance work, and helped with the development of the curriculum.

Keep reading

I just answered a similar question here.

To add to that answer, I will answer your question as an employer who has hired several "entry-level" employees (software developers) in the last few months. In all cases, the candidate we selected had some work experience on their resume. The job may not have been in software development, but it showed they had work experience. In one case, the candidate had around five years of experience as a private tutor (mainly while in college). In another case, the candidate had internship experience, had done freelance work, and helped with the development of her university's curriculum.

A resume I received this week is from someone who will soon be graduating with a master's degree. She has never had a full time job. But here is a list of his work experience:

  • Graduate Intern in Design Strategist (3 months)
  • Graduate Design Fellow (4 months)
  • Teaching Fellow (4 months)
  • Interaction Designer (2 years)
  • Creative Technical Intern: Emerging Technologies (3 months)

All of these were part-time jobs while they were in college. This is the kind of resume that catches the eye of employers.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.