Who is the most persuasive person you have ever seen. What makes them so persuasive?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Tia Taylor



Who is the most persuasive person you have ever seen. What makes them so persuasive?

For two years during graduate school at the University of Illinois, I was a teaching assistant for the freshman course on writing, rhetoric, and persuasion. To answer your first question, in my humble opinion, Barak Obama is the most persuasive speaker I have ever seen.

Now, the second part of your question. What makes a person persuasive is a combination of things. Aristotle's description of the ideal politician is a "good man, who speaks well." I think that definition is valid. We are talking about the person, the person behind the words, that the audience needs to perceive as "good", driven by needs other than their own.

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For two years during graduate school at the University of Illinois, I was a teaching assistant for the freshman course on writing, rhetoric, and persuasion. To answer your first question, in my humble opinion, Barak Obama is the most persuasive speaker I have ever seen.

Now, the second part of your question. What makes a person persuasive is a combination of things. Aristotle's description of the ideal politician is a "good man, who speaks well." I think that definition is valid. We are talking about the person, the person behind the words, that the audience needs to perceive as "good", driven by needs other than self-actualization or self-aggrandizement. The other part, "speak well", refers to how the content is presented. Clarity, organization, grammar, introduction and conclusion: all this and more influences the perception that the audience has of the speaker.

Although President Obama was unable to end gun violence, his (sadly) multiple speeches on this topic were deeply well written and presented.

Who was the most compelling person you met and why?

The most compelling person I met when I was 7 years old when I had my photo taken for my First Communion.

He was a disabled war veteran from World War II. Which is unbelievable and my eyes still blur when I "think" of him. He told me that his profession was photography and that he loved it.

He was so determined to get back to doing what he knew best before the war that even with one arm he went back to his photography, which made incredible pictures.

What did that mean that he was not going to let anything "stop" him from making his love for photography and

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Who was the most compelling person you met and why?

The most compelling person I met when I was 7 years old when I had my photo taken for my First Communion.

He was a disabled war veteran from World War II. Which is unbelievable and my eyes still blur when I "think" of him. He told me that his profession was photography and that he loved it.

He was so determined to get back to doing what he knew best before the war that even with one arm he went back to his photography, which made incredible pictures.

What that meant was that he was not going to let anything "stop" him from making his love for photography and I at age 7 learned the value of "determination" to do what is in your heart despite the problem that one have.

Comparing my parents to this man from whom they were physically healthy but did not have the determination to learn from those in difficulty makes me ashamed because my parents refuse to do what they can to have a better life for themselves and their family. Nothing should have stopped them like this person who was willing to go out of his way to do what he loved, which was studio photography.

The most persuasive person I have ever seen is Steinberg. I do not know your name. "Steinberg" all of that was on his name tag when I was pulled over by a broken taillight on the highway the other day.

When those red and blue lights started flashing in my rear view mirror, I immediately stopped. Immediately. That's pretty persuasive because I was late for an important appointment. She further demonstrated her persuasiveness when she walked over to the driver's side window and requested my license, registration, and insurance card. I was ready even before they asked me to.

The second most p

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The most persuasive person I have ever seen is Steinberg. I do not know your name. "Steinberg" all of that was on his name tag when I was pulled over by a broken taillight on the highway the other day.

When those red and blue lights started flashing in my rear view mirror, I immediately stopped. Immediately. That's pretty persuasive because I was late for an important appointment. She further demonstrated her persuasiveness when she walked over to the driver's side window and requested my license, registration, and insurance card. I was ready even before they asked me to.

The second most persuasive person I have ever seen was when I witnessed a robbery at a convenience store.

Third was my mother when she found out I was on the verge of a failing grade in algebra class. I didn't need a badge or a gun to keep him from telling me I'd better raise my grade to "C-" at the very least. But.

I have a pretty high bar for convincing behavior. Sincerity and authenticity are my guides, and there are too many examples of sincere people who could have fallen short anyway. I am often not convinced by others of things; I consider what is presented and make my own decisions, which may change repeatedly as new information is obtained. Welp. After solving this interesting question, I think I am the most convincing person I know, and the "why" is provided above. LOL

Hillary Clinton, of course. She made me vote for Trump! She was an important element in convincing me that the Democratic Party is full of murderers, thieves, cheaters, and crazy people! She convinced me that dressing a pig in a $ 12,500 Armani coat leaves him looking like a pig! What a great persuader! Well done Hillary !!

The man who came into my life as a normal guy from a personal ad. We had a 2 year affair.

Joanne, Mark.

They are both psychic, I am psychic. Very precise, sharp, witty and honest.

They were all clairvoyant.

Love,

Angela

The day my son convinced me to pay $ 2.00 for a soda can token:

My 5 year old son came to my room with a soda can tab in hand. He showed it to me and said:

"This is special. It would be a really good necklace. "

I replied, “You have to throw that away. It's rubbish. We don't keep trash. "He often gets attached to items that really should be thrown away. I don't want him to become a hoarder!

“But it would be a great necklace! You can use it and people will like it, ”he said.

“No, people would see it and recognize it as garbage, because it is something that everyone throws away. It would look

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The day my son convinced me to pay $ 2.00 for a soda can token:

My 5 year old son came to my room with a soda can tab in hand. He showed it to me and said:

"This is special. It would be a really good necklace. "

I replied, “You have to throw that away. It's rubbish. We don't keep trash. "He often gets attached to items that really should be thrown away. I don't want him to become a hoarder!

“But it would be a great necklace! You can use it and people will like it, ”he said.

“No, people would see it and recognize it as garbage, because it is something that everyone throws away. It would seem that he was using garbage, ”I tried to reason with him.

"But it would look beautiful on you, Mom." That got me. I asked him what he could hang it on.

"Rope, or maybe even some of your yarn!"

I took a pendant from an existing necklace of mine and replaced it with the tab from the soda can. I showed it to him. He was smiling. Just as I was about to get on, he calmly said:

"It will be two dollars." Two dollars! That crafty salesman. I laughed, impressed by his five-year sales tactics. He waited until I was convinced of the idea of ​​wearing a collar barb before asking the question. I talk to him about business from time to time, and apparently some of them get stuck!

I was too impressed with him NOT to give him $ 2.00. I found some cash and handed him two $ 1 bills. For a soda can tab. For the trash. But he was actually paying for a lot more than that. He hoped that he would remember the experience and that it would increase his self-confidence to sell.

And that's how my son convinced me to buy a soda can token!

I wore the necklace with pride the rest of the day.

Paying him that day was worth it (literally).

A couple of weekends later, we had a garage sale. He told me he wanted to sell one of his nerf guns. I helped him price it (he wanted a ridiculous amount like $ 100) and sat him in a chair behind a table with his nerf gun on top. He also had a container full of bags of assorted pretzels and crackers, plus cans of La Croix on ice (La Croix is ​​a sparkling water drink). Those extra items were there to be a cheap impulse purchase that, in theory, would facilitate a second, larger purchase.

I helped him with a script, we did a role play several times and then we waited for people to come. A couple stopped and got out of their car. When they were close enough, my son started,

"Hi, how are you today?"

The man replied, "Great! What about you?"

"Have children?" My boy started his speech by selling his nerf gun.

"All my children have grown up!"

My son was prepared. "You have grandchildren?"

"Yes," the man replied, then went on to talk about them and their ages (they were older children).

“You could surprise them with a nerf gun. Would you like to buy it for seven dollars? He asked, willing to lower the cost to $ 5.00.

"No," replied the man, "my grandchildren are too old to play with them."

My son didn't miss a beat, "Are you hungry or thirsty?"

The man was shocked and then laughed. Then he laughed some more.

"You know what? I don't want this, but I'll give you two bucks for it. You're a great salesman, ”he said as he took a can of La Croix and handed my son a couple of dollars.

Later, his partner went to the same pitch. He ended up buying some cookies.

The nerf gun was never sold that day, but a lot of cookie tins and bags were sold.

There are courses focused on this like the Dale (Carnegie) course, which I have taken twice. (How to win friends and influence people) There are many tactics involved and of course it is not an exact science. It is not a "safe way" as you requested, but it has a phenomenal success rate.

People listen to their allies, not their adversaries ...

Influence

One tool that I find particularly effective is to fully agree with the other person, while expressing that you have slightly different reasons for your position than he / she, although you do not differ with his / her conclusion. That opens them to an ac

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There are courses focused on this like the Dale (Carnegie) course, which I have taken twice. (How to win friends and influence people) There are many tactics involved and of course it is not an exact science. It is not a "safe way" as you requested, but it has a phenomenal success rate.

People listen to their allies, not their adversaries ...

Influence

One tool that I find particularly effective is to fully agree with the other person, while expressing that you have slightly different reasons for your position than he / she, although you do not differ with his / her conclusion. That opens them up to listen and consider what you have to say rather than putting them on the defensive.

You won't convince them by doing this, but you can help them reconsider parts of your opinions and evaluate what you have to say fairly. Using this power, you can often bring them to your side on some key aspect of your posture, the most critical aspect of your differences.

You should continue the charade, agreeing with their opinions for the most part and only trying to change what is important to you. (Choose your battles carefully). Be sure to underline your key points and reinforce your pride as a lever to gain their trust.

As you do this, you can greatly increase your power over them by listening carefully and using questions rather than suggestions. And most importantly, swallow your pride - avoid taking credit for their change of mind. However, remember that this will only work if your opinions are respected.

And if they have thought about something objectively, researched it well, and formed their opinion with an open mind, then you have little chance of influencing them. (If that's the case, maybe you should reconsider your own opinion.)

Example

Let's say Bill and I are going to interview a job candidate and I know Bill is going for the "got you" questions, which I disagree with. Bill will veto the applicant if he skips a question, even if he is well qualified.

Bill: I can always identify a bad programmer with a few trick questions.

Me: Good idea. What is your favorite?

Bill: I ask them to write code to make a string copy, then I see if they code it from scratch or if they are smart enough to just call a library function.

Me: I see where you're going with this. Want to see if they start coding before the requirements are specified?

Bill: Yeah, well, that too. But I don't want you to waste time reinventing the wheel!

Me: That's a great approach. So you tell them up front that the goal is to complete the code as quickly as possible?

Bill: No, not really. They must know that this is the goal.

Me: It sure is. That's my goal around here. That would be a good question for me or anyone who has worked in a similar environment. I guess if the candidate came from a company where they wrote low-level code and avoided calls to the library, we wouldn't want to hire that candidate.

Bill: It's not that I wouldn't hire him, it's just that his priorities are screwed up.

Me: I see. That's a great way to get a background on the candidate so you know how to interpret their responses. Smart, Bill.

Bill: Ugh ... Yeah. And then, well ... my next question, ugh, would be based on how he / she answered that one.

Me: (Shut up so you don't miss it. He's on board now).

Good luck.

As someone who was a former salesperson in the science and computer fields, honesty almost always worked. Customers, and people in general, are used to being told that they need something, that they should have it, and that creates a pressure situation. However, if you are honest and talk to the person about what they really need, what they really should have, and put it in terms of truth and dollars ... you will get this answer: Well, I have this amount to spend, and I have this project to complete, what can you do for me with that? It has opened a communication channel, a

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As someone who was a former salesperson in the science and computer fields, honesty almost always worked. Customers, and people in general, are used to being told that they need something, that they should have it, and that creates a pressure situation. However, if you are honest and talk to the person about what they really need, what they really should have, and put it in terms of truth and dollars ... you will get this answer: Well, I have this amount to spend, and I have this project to complete, what can you do for me with that? You have opened a channel of communication and by doing so you are in a place to persuade your decision, without the use of less than honest means. Do not increase the sale, do not add, and put any discounts at the end (as a token of good faith).

Now the same goes for hard selling. I've faced people selling items at a much cheaper price, and I had to tell a customer that, in all honesty, they were buying quality and service from me for the extra money. I would prove it by discounting the first order as much as I am allowed and then backing up all the things I told you about my product, my service, and my commitment to the customer. Many clients and individuals approach negotiations in this way. They will attack you with the low ball approach and tell you that they have a lot less than they have, that they need less than what you can offer, and that they can provide all the service they need. These are them trying to get the best deal up front. The same goes for any speech between people. Some discussions start with someone saying the most hurtful things they could have done, and then escalate, trying to wear you down, and make you come back to them with the same vitriol and lose your own point in the process. Stay calm and don't get caught up in name calling or mind games. Always counter with the truth and sincere apologies for having offended, and never use a conjunction to say that you are wrong. Apologies come best when they say "I'm sorry", add a but and blame it. "I'm sorry, but you should have known that I am ..." well, you just blame the other person. The same is true of all conversations, whether it is selling, buying, or discussing. The buts, and, or, nor, etc. they will reduce an entire conversation to nothing more than an excuse as to why the other person, place or thing is wrong. and don't get caught up in name calling or mind games. Always counter with the truth and sincere apologies for having offended, and never use a conjunction to say that you are wrong. Apologies come best when they say "I'm sorry", add a but and blame it. "I'm sorry, but you should have known that I am ..." well, you just blame the other person. The same is true of all conversations, whether it is selling, buying, or discussing. The buts, and, or, nor, etc. they will reduce an entire conversation to nothing more than an excuse why the other person, place, or thing is wrong. and don't get caught up in name calling or mind games. Always counter with the truth and sincere apologies for having offended, and never use a conjunction to say that you are wrong. Apologies come best when they say "I'm sorry", add a but and blame it. "I'm sorry, but you should have known that I am ..." well, you just blame the other person. The same is true of all conversations, whether it is selling, buying, or discussing. The buts, and, or, nor, etc. they will reduce an entire conversation to nothing more than an excuse why the other person, place, or thing is wrong. "I'm sorry, but you should have known that I am ..." well, you just blame the other person. The same is true of all conversations, whether it is selling, buying, or discussing. The buts, and, or, nor, etc. they will reduce an entire conversation to nothing more than an excuse why the other person, place, or thing is wrong. "I'm sorry, but you should have known that I am ..." well, you just blame the other person. The same is true of all conversations, whether it is selling, buying, or discussing. The buts, and, or, nor, etc. they will reduce an entire conversation to nothing more than an excuse why the other person, place, or thing is wrong.

Low ball, low shot, and low pitch are old-school negotiations and are used often. I've seen my father get up and walk out of the car dealerships, only to have him wave back. It taught me that it does work, that sticking to your goal will work, but it's a lot more effort than the “start honestly” approach. The last time I rented a vehicle, I walked in, sat down, said what I wanted, and told the salesperson that I wanted to be frank and honest at every step, and he paused and said it was okay. Did I get the best deal? Probably not, cars are a different animal, but I know I had no regrets, got what I wanted, felt I was treated fairly, and left in a brand new vehicle in the shortest amount of time.

So let's go back to the thesis in the last paragraph, the difficult approach. I got off topic when I walked into my father buying a car. The complainer and the noisy customer, the babbler and the “but you” negotiator want to control the situation, and if you are careful, you can give them enough to make them feel in control. You can agree with what they say, without giving an iota of your position, and while they speak, they are in control, and when you have the opportunity, you inject reality and truth, and above all common sense. This done, what remains to be disputed. As long as you have been completely transparent with the facts and can fully back them up, you can pressure / persuade the person of your point of view. When in front of a judge, for example, be sincere, honest and direct. Don't waste your time and put the facts into reality with something to refer to if necessary. Do this and you will win. I've been in sham court with the dramatic guys, the aspiring TV lawyer, and closed them with my low-key, less dramatic, and sincere approach. The same goes for everyday life. Keep it real, simple and honest. The second someone feels they are being manipulated, no matter how long it takes, you lose all your power, because you were working a trick and making it go against their original way of doing things. The same goes for everyday life. Keep it real, simple and honest. The second someone feels they are being manipulated, no matter how long it takes, you lose all your power, because you were working a trick and making it go against their original way of doing things. The same goes for everyday life. Keep it real, simple and honest. The second someone feels they are being manipulated, no matter how long it takes, you lose all your power, because you were working a trick and making it go against their original way of doing things.

Bottom line ... be honest and never buy the extended warranty if it's more than 10% of the cost of the item ... unless you have kids and there is accident coverage then go, 15-20% max, unless you bought with a credit card that has all of that built into it. Also, don't argue with your partner over money - that's an always-losing proposition. Never buy a car on a sunny day. Wait for it to rain, your exchange will look better.

Charisma is a condition that has been enhanced by persuasion.

Part of a person's charisma is the product of genetics, from which they get their looks, intelligence, skills, and much more.

Another part of a person's charisma is the product of a well-managed ethos, perhaps the most important element in Aristotle's triumvirate of ethos, pathos, and logos. Without ethos, which comprises intelligence (not the genetic component, but a combination of learning and street intelligence), virtue and goodwill. Today, we call the ethos package simply credibility, or "street cred," like the

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Charisma is a condition that has been enhanced by persuasion.

Part of a person's charisma is the product of genetics, from which they get their looks, intelligence, skills, and much more.

Another part of a person's charisma is the product of a well-managed ethos, perhaps the most important element in Aristotle's triumvirate of ethos, pathos, and logos. Without ethos, which comprises intelligence (not the genetic component, but a combination of learning and street intelligence), virtue and goodwill. Today, we call the package of ethical values ​​simply credibility, or "street cred," as the young people say.

To be credible with an audience of one, a dozen, or a thousand, you have to be incredibly good at keeping your spirit. Sometimes you have to show virtue, like Nick Nolte did in the movie The Good Thief. He could have been a gamer, a thief, and a drug addict, but he wasn't a bully. He was a thief with a heart of gold, who identified with the type of people that society labeled as losers. Consequently, he not only earned the admiration of his fellow losers, but also the grudging admiration of the law and order crowd.

A charismatic person, then, makes himself, but only in the sense that he takes his genetic endowment and shapes it for his benefit. If intelligence, virtue and goodwill are simply a facade, that is their choice and they face the very real possibility of being caught in their deception. If, on the other hand, their spirit is genuine, they can accomplish much both for themselves and for their fellow men in the ongoing drama of good versus evil.

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