Who created mathematics and why do we need it in our daily lives?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Kyle Rose



Who created mathematics and why do we need it in our daily lives?

This is a loaded question. Some might even argue that the mathematics was not created, but was discovered. If I have a stone and you give me one, how many do I have? 1 + 1 = 2. I have two stones. Did someone create this or was it a part of reality that was discovered?

Why do we need it? You buy a pizza for $ 7.50 and pass me one for $ 20. I'll give you back $ 11.50. What happened? Mathematics allows you to understand what happens in life. It is a powerful tool to generate and save and generate money. If you like money, you should love math.

Find and read Quanta magazine and read about college professors dealing with or designing math and physics. We have math not just in the United States but in our world because math is the foundation of chemistry, physics, economics, STEM, and more. Look for the American Institute of Physics (AIP) History Bulletin and ask them to send you a hard copy of the bulletin because it answers your questions about who created physics.

I hope you look up and enjoy these answers!

Just to name a few of the many things you wouldn't have without math.

  • Computers and smartphones
  • The Internet
  • Computer graphics (games and all movies with CGI)
  • Commercial aircraft
  • Space travel
  • Microwaves
  • Gps

Originally Answered Question: Why did mathematics work in real life when it was created by humans?


Crudely, perhaps somewhat frivolously, though actually quite seriously, I would like to ask you the following questions:

  • Why does a Rubik's cube work in real life when it was created by humans? Lest the relevance be clear, a Rubik's cube is a puzzle or a game, isn't it?
  • Why did hammers work in real life when they were created by humans? Lest the relevance be clear, a hammer is a tool, right?
  • Why did English work in real life when it was created by humans? Lest the relevance be clear, Englis
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Originally Answered Question: Why did mathematics work in real life when it was created by humans?


Crudely, perhaps somewhat frivolously, though actually quite seriously, I would like to ask you the following questions:

  • Why does a Rubik's cube work in real life when it was created by humans? Lest the relevance be clear, a Rubik's cube is a puzzle or a game, isn't it?
  • Why did hammers work in real life when they were created by humans? Lest the relevance be clear, a hammer is a tool, right?
  • Why did English work in real life when it was created by humans? Lest the relevance be clear, English is a language, isn't it?

The first thing in common in the questions above is that they ask why it works in real life when it is created by humans. Just like your question does.

The second common thing in the questions above is that they are definitely quite vague as to what they even mean when they say 'they work in real life'! As is your question.

The third common thing in the questions above is that even though they ask the question of 'why' something works, if one looks at the answers given, it will turn out that such an answer will address the question of 'how'. it works instead of "why" it works.

The last thing, perhaps not so obviously common in the questions above, is that they refer to aspects of mathematics.

  • Mathematics can be seen as a symbolic game or a puzzle, if you like. And like the Rubik's Cube, it works in real life, although one might wonder what it does.

    The answer can be as simple as: its function is to entertain and amuse. Perhaps it is better to say that a function can be entertaining and amusing. And it can fulfill that role quite well in real life, regardless of whatever other role we have in mind. Rubik's cubes can also be used as paperweights. In a pinch, they can even be used as throwing weapons, and I'm sure the reader can, with some creativity, come up with many other uses. The Rubik's cube is actually quite a versatile thing. As is the mathematics.
  • Mathematics can be seen as a tool. And just like the hammer is a tool that can be used to help hit sharp pointed things against other things, but it can also be used as a tool to knock down a wall or sink a skull, the math, when they look like a The tool can be used to help accomplish many different tasks.
  • Mathematics can be seen as a language, or perhaps more precisely as incorporating a language. And just as English can be used to talk about many things, such as goblins, unicorns, electrons, people, alternate universes, etc., mathematics can be used to talk about many different kinds of things, such as numbers, voting. strategies, test systems, optimal dildo vibration frequencies, etc.

Now, I rather suspect that you are really wondering not so much why mathematics works in real life, but rather why it is that the language of mathematics can be used as a tool to somehow describe aspects of the real world. Whether that tool was created by humans or not has no relevance here. It could well have been created by extraterrestrials out of the world and handed over to us. That wouldn't change a thing about math.

In fact, even if it was never created at all, by anyone, but has always existed and has simply been discovered by humans (or aliens and they've gifted it to us), that wouldn't change anything about the math either.

Rather I suspect that your question actually refers to what is sometimes called 'The unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences' 1. That is an observation that using the language of mathematics to describe models of reality allows us to build models that in many ways seem to reflect that reality, in the same sense that a Lego house reflects many aspects of a house. real.

One could well speak of the "unreasonable effectiveness of Lego blocks in house design."

But is this efficiency really that unreasonable? After all, we perceive the world in terms of objects and connections between these objects. It is natural that our languages, which refer to these objects and connections, describe the world in those same terms. We see the world in terms of temporal and structural patterns. It is natural that our languages, which refer to these patterns, describe the world in terms of these patterns. One would almost ask the question: how could it be otherwise?

It is not so surprising at all if we see our world in those terms. our languages ​​will reflect that by introducing symbols to represent the world in those terms. When you say that 'mathematics works in real life', you are really just saying that (the language of) mathematics is pretty good at describing things, their structural and temporal connections and patterns in terms of things, their structural connections and patterns and temporary. . This is no surprise! We see the world in these terms, and therefore we introduce symbols that reflect that point of view.

But there are many things that are not necessarily real that can be described in those terms. Mathematics is just good enough to describe things, real or not, in those terms. If our perception of reality were to change in any way, we would still describe this new perception in terms of the concepts I mentioned, things, connections, and patterns.

In fact, you could say that mathematics can express any type of thing that can be thought and described in those terms, which simply includes any perception that we may have of reality, since it is in those terms. That doesn't say much about reality itself, rather it says more about how we perceive that reality.

Footnotes

1 The unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences - Wikipedia

It seems that it was created by various groups of people independently.

There are two mathematical things that seem to be the first that a group of people create (or discover, according to philosophy).

One is a calendar. The other is accounting. Both are key elements of a civilization.

Without some kind of timetable, agriculture cannot get very far. Farmers don't know when to plant. In some tropical climates there may be environmental signs that suggest that now is a good time to plant, but those signs are too late to prepare the ground for planting.

Even in the most forgiving climates, growing

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It seems that it was created by various groups of people independently.

There are two mathematical things that seem to be the first that a group of people create (or discover, according to philosophy).

One is a calendar. The other is accounting. Both are key elements of a civilization.

Without some kind of timetable, agriculture cannot get very far. Farmers don't know when to plant. In some tropical climates there may be environmental signs that suggest that now is a good time to plant, but those signs are too late to prepare the ground for planting.

Even in the most forgiving climates, calendar-guided farmers (usually read by specialists like priests) have a substantial advantage. In other climates, timing is much more critical.

In ancient Egypt, the Nile flood was quite predictable on a calendar, but not otherwise. Knowing when that annual flood would occur was the difference between prosperity and death.

In areas outside the tropics, spring often does not show signs in time for planting. Wait until it's warm enough to know just from the weather that there will be no frost or cold that will kill the crops, and that your crop won't be ready until it's too late in the fall. Wait too long and even if the cold doesn't ruin your crop, your competitors will have already sold their crop and left the market satisfied.

And without accounting, trading is limited to what you and your trading partner can physically bring to market today.

Once you have a schedule for making your farming effective enough to grow more than you eat, and an accounting to deal with the extra, you can turn your math into things like advanced architecture. You can't build pyramids if everyone has to farm all the time. You also can't build pyramids until you can make deals with carvers and builders.

So now you have mathematicians telling farmers when to plant, and farmers who listen prosper while everyone else does not. You have mathematicians who help you make fair deals, and if you don't listen to them, they cheat you. You have mathematicians who help design majestic and useful buildings, and if you don't listen to them, your buildings either collapse or are ugly and inefficient.

You get used to listening to your mathematicians. Either you starve or you get crushed by bricks or at least you find yourself living in a shack that someone charged you too much for.

So when mathematicians start to play with numbers, shapes, and concepts in ways that are interesting to them but not necessarily really useful right now, they tell you to feed them anyway and you listen. And your civilization thrives (probably. It's weird, but civilizations can fail for reasons other than illiteracy) because some of those numbers, shapes, and concepts turn out to be useful after all.

And, I'm told, if you find yourself trapped on Mars and do enough math, you might go home. The movie was pretty good, I haven't read the book yet.

There is a profound answer and a practical answer to this.

First, the practical answer. For my career, statistics, linear algebra, and calculus (in that order). I'm about to start my first job as a data scientist, but I've been using these three skills for data analysis and process modeling for at least 10 years ... in everything from clerical jobs to facilitating workshops in the place.

Now the profound answer. Mathematics is the last and reliable abstraction of reality. It hides in the background of almost all scientific and academic disciplines.

For example, I learned a second language at age 22 or

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There is a profound answer and a practical answer to this.

First, the practical answer. For my career, statistics, linear algebra, and calculus (in that order). I'm about to start my first job as a data scientist, but I've been using these three skills for data analysis and process modeling for at least 10 years ... in everything from clerical jobs to facilitating workshops in the place.

Now the profound answer. Mathematics is the last and reliable abstraction of reality. It hides in the background of almost all scientific and academic disciplines.

For example, I learned a second language at age 22 after I had never considered taking on that challenge before. When I began to think of new vocabulary and foreign words as nothing more than variables for ideas, and grammar as rules for linking those variables, I began to advance in my language learning. My math degree represents how I think about the world every day of my life.

I make observations, which form patterns, and those patterns culminate in theories and formulas. These theories are great for making sense of what I see next. So when an inexplicable observation comes up that contradicts my formula, I have to create a new formula that fits reality.

I think everyone does this on some level, but mathematical thinking brings this process to the fore and humbles you when something new comes up that challenges your beliefs or your current model. Of course, a mathematical framing of daily events is not the only way to achieve goals and lead a happy life, but it has been an effective framework for me personally.

I've written a kind of postscript disclaimer at the end of this answer that might clarify some of the questions that I think you should anticipate.

I am not the most 'advanced' programmer, I have only really focused on a single language, Python. But also the occasional second language here and there.

At first, you might think that the ability to code requires an innate mathematical mind. In a language like Python, all you really see as a beginner are simple, Boolean, or other operations. Mathematics is a logical, analytical and rational subject and will be (in most cases) involved with the establishment

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I've written a kind of postscript disclaimer at the end of this answer that might clarify some of the questions that I think you should anticipate.

I am not the most 'advanced' programmer, I have only really focused on a single language, Python. But also the occasional second language here and there.

At first, you might think that the ability to code requires an innate mathematical mind. In a language like Python, all you really see as a beginner are simple, Boolean, or other operations. Mathematics is a logical, analytical and rational subject and (in most cases) will participate in establishing the logic of a program. How do you want it to work? How can you make it work? Why do you use XYZ to make it work? Although the programming is not explicitly mathematical when you start, you progress to more mathematical subtopics like algorithms. Recursive formulas. Arrays. Graphic Schema Theory. Probability. Calculation. Data structures / management. This list goes on.

The point is, if I haven't exaggerated it enough, mathematics is extremely important in computer science. With mathematics, programming languages ​​would not exist. The automation of tasks (in general) will not exist or will be of a very basic level. You could go as far as to say that computers will not exist. And he would be right. If you consider Alan Turing, he used mathematics to come up with the concept of a Turing machine.

Simply speaking, programming would not be logically possible if mathematics did not exist. For example, you couldn't write loops that rely on conditional variables because, well, if math wasn't involved, conditional statements wouldn't be a thing. If math wasn't involved, you couldn't even write the most basic if statement: if (x == 1) {cout << “Hello world” << endl; - this is a basic C ++ example. Even this extremely basic example uses math, or more specifically, equalities (like>, <, =, etc.)

What I'm trying to say is that if someone told you that math is not important at all "in the everyday life of a programmer," they would be lying to you and, frankly, it would seem stupid.

I'll give you one, for example: virtually every college, on the course requirements page for a degree in Computer Science, requires you to have a good grade in math from a previous education. They may not even require you to have any background with the computer science course itself. For example, in the UK, in the school I go to, sixth-year university requires that to do an A-Level in Computer Science, you must have at least a grade 7 (equivalent to an A) in mathematics . Computer science is not even mentioned on their level A subject requirements page).

This implies that the subject of mathematics in the context of computer science is extremely important.

Apologies for the long answer, but I wanted to get my point across, and I think I did ...

So to conclude, YES, MATH IS VERY IMPORTANT IN THE DAILY LIFE OF A PROGRAMMER.

EDIT: I have noticed some fellow Quorans mention that the level of math required in programming really depends on the type of program one is trying to write. Encryption, for example, would require quite a bit of math. And convert between multiple bases, such as BASE-2 or BASE-10 or BASE-16. Yes, mathematics is important for this.

It doesn't necessarily matter if you are not the most confident or talented mathematician. The point of programming is that you solve problems in whatever way you think is the best way to solve said problem and whether or not that involves A LOT of math or a LITTLE math really depends on how you write that program.

I have also noticed that many people are focusing on the more advanced math topics that are important in computer science. Yes, these are very important. So I just want to clarify that, while writing my answer, I am concentrating on the most basic mathematical concepts used in programming, the ones that every programmer is sure to come across. This is what I used as the basis for my argument. So yes, depending on the program you are writing, the math level will vary. However, that does not mean that I am arguing that mathematics is always important to a programmer and his livelihood as a programmer, because it certainly is.

I have also noticed that some mention that during their career as a programmer, the work they do does not involve any significant mathematics; in some cases, the most advanced math one could do is "add one to a variable."

Then yes. Once again, IT DEPENDS.

It seems that you have a wrong idea of ​​what mathematics is and you are confused between the essence of mathematics and the tools used in mathematics.

It is difficult to define what mathematics is, but a popular definition is that mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space, and change.

Taking the example of your rocket, you definitely need to know how much fuel to put in it (amount), how it moves in space, how its mass and speed changes, etc. So no matter what you do, if you want to be able to launch that rocket, there is no way to do math.

How the math is done is a different matter. Modern mathematics is full of symbols

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It seems that you have a wrong idea of ​​what mathematics is and you are confused between the essence of mathematics and the tools used in mathematics.

It is difficult to define what mathematics is, but a popular definition is that mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space, and change.

Taking the example of your rocket, you definitely need to know how much fuel to put in it (amount), how it moves in space, how its mass and speed changes, etc. So no matter what you do, if you want to be able to launch that rocket, there is no way to do math.

How the math is done is a different matter. Modern mathematics is full of symbols and formulas, and has been associated with them. But you can do math using just words if you want to, and there were times when this was how it was done.

The reason we have switched to using formulas is that mathematicians are lazy and have found that doing math with formulas is much, much, much easier.

Much.

To give an example, there was a time when to solve a quadratic equation, you would say something like

"To find a thing such that the thing squared multiplied by a number, plus the thing multiplied by a second number, plus a third number, is equal to zero, let the thing be the ratio of two terms, the second term being double of the first number, the first term being the negative of the second number, plus or minus the square root of the difference between the square of the second number and four times the product of the first and third numbers ”.

Today we only say

"The solution to math ax ^ 2 + bx + c = 0 / math is math x = \ frac {-b \ pm \ sqrt {b ^ 2-4ac}} {2a} / math ".

Tell me, in what way is it easier to use, develop and work? What is more applicable to much, much more difficult problems than simply solving quadratic equations? You won't make much progress if you impose arbitrary restrictions in addition to the problem at hand, such as avoiding the use of symbols.

No, software engineers don't need math, as many answers here point out.

But from the details of the question, I have a feeling that the question really wants to be "is there a software engineering position where I need to know math?" The answer is definitely yes.

Many positions require doing numerical calculations. These days, machine learning is very important; you will definitely need to know math: linear algebra, calculus, gradient descent.

Video games and other computer graphics applications require math to calculate positions and values ​​of color and so on.

If you work on compilers or PL theory

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No, software engineers don't need math, as many answers here point out.

But from the details of the question, I have a feeling that the question really wants to be "is there a software engineering position where I need to know math?" The answer is definitely yes.

Many positions require doing numerical calculations. These days, machine learning is very important; you will definitely need to know math: linear algebra, calculus, gradient descent.

Video games and other computer graphics applications require math to calculate positions and values ​​of color and so on.

If you work in compilers or PL theory, you will want to know some mathematical logic.

If you work in crypto libraries, you will want to know number theory or maybe even more advanced things like elliptic curves. (If you're just using encryption libraries, you won't need to know any of that.)

I don't know if it counts "algorithms / data structures" as math, but certainly many applications require knowledge of them. High-performance computing and wide-spread systems will have many opportunities for an algorithm to shine.

-

In my last 3 years as a software engineer, where I mostly did "generic web development", I barely used math. But I did things like:

  • fermi calculations to find out how many resources large database migration operations would take
  • some basic algebra so I could write CSS to place things the way I wanted
  • determine the probability of collisions between randomly generated IDs
  • build algorithms by drawing arrow diagrams in a way that feels vaguely mathy

So I think if you look it up, you can find uses for mathematics even among the "simplest" software engineering jobs. You can get by without it, but it can still help in little ways.

It is not clear that mathematics was created at a specific time for a specific need. Therefore, it is dangerous to talk about the first causes. It doesn't even exist as a physical thing. One can only guess how mathematics has been part of the development of homo sapiens and how it developed in return, in a similar approach to Darwin's.

The human being is not particularly strong, has no skin, has no external bones, cannot dig, is not resistant to disease, has few babies, cannot store fresh water, cannot run, taste, climb, jump, fly or to swim. It is only good with colors, walking, and precise hand movements. Rats or

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It is not clear that mathematics was created at a specific time for a specific need. Therefore, it is dangerous to talk about the first causes. It doesn't even exist as a physical thing. One can only guess how mathematics has been part of the development of homo sapiens and how it developed in return, in a similar approach to Darwin's.

The human being is not particularly strong, has no skin, has no external bones, cannot dig, is not resistant to disease, has few babies, cannot store fresh water, cannot run, taste, climb, jump, fly or to swim. It is only good with colors, walking, and precise hand movements. Rats, on the other hand, have a killer immune system, eat and drink almost anything, escape predators quickly as hell, adapt easily to environmental changes, climb, dig, smell food from afar, reproduce at an alarming rate and they've been around. longer than us. How the heck does our species now have more living limbs than rats?

Obviously, our ancestors observed the world. Those who were able to understand it better probably increased their chances of survival. Those who survived the best were the masters of tool-building, communication of abstract concepts, and collaboration.

Arithmetic concepts like addition and multiplication probably existed before history, as some of the oldest documents ever found were about tracking food deliveries and payments. People who kept good records of their livestock probably had an advantage over those who allowed the gods to bring their goats before sunset.

The math probably started with counting skills the day a hunter had to indicate the count of animals being tracked and needed more fingers and toes available or when a mother realized that she did not have to collect all the apples from one tree, only one per finger. in one hand, by a member of his family. Counting efficiently probably gave our ancestors an advantage in moving forward faster with better survival plans. The trio of hunters decided to call some friends before attacking a group of 21 wild pigs and lived long enough to tell the story and have babies. The counting mother picked enough apples to feed her family,

We could reasonably believe that linguistics and mathematics are the abstract tools that gave our ancestors the only viable advantages over other life forms to survive, including our own. These edges are so important and develop so fast that they more than outweigh our many disadvantages to natural selection.

Mathematics is part of the survival skills of Homo Sapiens. Talking about the cause of its creation is similar to talking about the causes of the creation of humanity or sexual reproduction. It simply provides efficient ways to survive as a species in our current environment.

Mathematics or Mathematics, the problems they solve in it are through logic, not merely based on assumptions. Our world needs mathematics to understand things logically. Also for precision, which can happen through math alone, not science. Science tells what is right and what is wrong and also why that particular thing is that place. To get to that place, we need math. Mathematics is not only linked to numbers or calculation, it is more than that. Distance, time, height, speed, permutation and combination, probability. Since it can help a person in his day to also see himself in today's world. Help to do construction and a

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Mathematics or Mathematics, the problems they solve in it are through logic, not merely based on assumptions. Our world needs mathematics to understand things logically. Also for precision, what can happen through math, not just science. Science tells what is right and what is wrong and also why that particular thing is that place. To get to that place, we need math. Mathematics is not only linked to numbers or calculation, it is more than that. Distance, time, height, speed, permutation and combination, probability. Since it can help a person in his day to also see himself in today's world. Help in construction and antiquity helped builders to build monuments. Without math we cannot count, add, subtract, divide or multiply. Everyone needs to have a basic knowledge of mathematics for their daily activities.

Detecting financial fraud in the country. A person also needs math to analyze his expenses and how he can curb them. Problems that occur in large and complex communication networks can be solved with the help of mathematics.

If I have gotten stuck in some problem, math can help me solve that problem if I had solved the math problem. Solving a math problem sharpens your mind and helps you make decisions quickly, logically, and accurately. Many people think that mathematics does not solve any purpose in everyday life. It is not true and the solutions to your daily life problems are taught in math. Just like you solve a math problem in a similar way, a person can easily solve your life problem. I had never encountered a difficult Mathematics subject, it was more of a pleasant subject in which a person has more luxury to enjoy studying and doing it than another subject.

From my point of view, in 11th grade math is as important as any other subject. It is just a part of the general knowledge that everyone should have. In my opinion, at this point you should definitely study all subjects with equal dedication. You never know what will happen tomorrow and what field of knowledge will be useful to you.

The basics of math are helpful in everyday life. Keep in mind that in the future your children may ask for your help with homework. What's more, I value people with extensive knowledge. They can talk to others about all topics, discuss and exchange ideas. Personally

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From my point of view, in 11th grade math is as important as any other subject. It is just a part of the general knowledge that everyone should have. In my opinion, at this point you should definitely study all subjects with equal dedication. You never know what will happen tomorrow and what field of knowledge will be useful to you.

The basics of math are helpful in everyday life. Keep in mind that in the future your children may ask for your help with homework. What's more, I value people with extensive knowledge. They can talk to others about all topics, discuss and exchange ideas. Personally, I try to do my best to become a "scholar."

Also, math requires you to think analytically. I have noticed that people who are dedicated to science or engineering approach their life tasks and jobs differently from others, in a more logical and organized way.

As for the exams, it's up to you. It should be your own deliberate decision that fits you and your plans.

If I were you, I would reflect on my interests, the universities I would like to apply to, and possible fields of study. Then I will contact a faculty advisor or speak with a trusted teacher at the school. They are usually willing to help and advise you.

Keep asking questions on Quora too. It's a really good place to get helpful tips.

I can also recommend that you follow Tom Stagliano. He's one of the "scholarly" guys. His worldly knowledge and wisdom are priceless. I really appreciate your significant contribution to Quora content.

Also, check out the course and learn more about college life. U101: Understanding College and College Life - University of Washington | Coursera.

All the best.

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