Which movie best described the life of Steve Jobs "Jobs" or "Steve Jobs"?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Raphael Walls



Which movie best described the life of Steve Jobs "Jobs" or "Steve Jobs"?

Re. What movie is the best description of "the life of Steve Jobs", I don't think any movie describes his life. What they portray is "a man's journey through his work." The only production that managed to portray Jobs' life a bit (apart from his job) was "Pirates of Silicon Valley", which I will explain below.

As for the movies you ask me about, all I can do is pass on what those who knew Jobs have said about them. Steve Wozniak has been the leading public film critic of Jobs' depictions. He didn't like "Jobs". He said it was opened up to the producers of that movie, if they

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Re. What movie is the best description of "the life of Steve Jobs", I don't think any movie describes his life. What they portray is "a man's journey through his work." The only production that managed to portray Jobs' life a bit (apart from his job) was "Pirates of Silicon Valley", which I will explain below.

As for the movies you ask me about, all I can do is pass on what those who knew Jobs have said about them. Steve Wozniak has been the leading public film critic of Jobs' depictions. He didn't like "Jobs". He said he opened up to the producers of that movie, if they had any questions, and they never contacted him. He didn't think the way they portrayed Jobs, or himself, was accurate. I have seen a part of “Jobs” and realized that they had some correct historical and factual details, but I take Woz's word that, in terms of people, the movie was wrong.

He liked "Steve Jobs". Several people who worked with Jobs were interviewed about this movie, and what I remember is that they said that there are many things in it that are historically inaccurate, but that Sorkin captured the personality of Jobs well. When Sorkin was asked about the historical inaccuracy, he said he was not making a biopic. As I recall, he said, "I was trying to tell a story" that he wanted to tell. Woz and John Sculley said they liked the way they were portrayed. Sculley particularly liked it, because it features a scene where Sculley and Jobs clash about the direction Apple took. The conflict between them, after the Macintosh was introduced, caused Jobs to lose his position on the Macintosh team. Later, he decided to leave the company. Sculley had long felt that his version of that story hadn't been told, and he was glad to see it finally being told in this movie. The audience can choose for themselves who had the strongest argument. Apple's address.

Some people knew Jobs and raised objections to the way he was portrayed in "Steve Jobs", but someone (I don't remember who now) pointed out that all the people who raised objections were people who were not portrayed in the film. One of the people who complained was Walt Mossberg, who said that the film, for the most part, did not portray the Jobs he remembers, that the man he remembers is portrayed towards the end of the film, but not the rest of the film. film. that. However, he admitted that he only knew Jobs from the late 1990s onwards. I think I can explain this.

Another portrait that Steve Wozniak liked was a made-for-television movie made in the late 1990s called "Pirates of Silicon Valley," based on the book "Fire in the Valley." It covers the history of Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Bill Gates, and Paul Allen from 1974 to 1985, and then moves forward a bit towards the end of 1997. Woz said as to the scenes with him and Jobs, and scenes at Apple, everything you see actually happened, although some of the scenes are out of historical sequence, but all the dialogue is completely fictional. The reason is that the producers did not do interviews with real people, to avoid lawsuits. Some of the background material that was used to portray scenes was taken from Robert Cringely's documentary “Triumph of the Nerds.

Bill Gates criticized Pirates, saying he hated the way he portrayed Steve Ballmer, "It was nothing like that."

It seems to me that Jobs changed over time. The first part of "Steve Jobs" begins with what it was like when the first Macintosh was released. Larry Tesler, who knew him and had worked at Apple during this period, said that sometimes Jobs could be a terrorist (he used that word), but other times he was the most charismatic person he had ever met, and it was difficult. know how to feel when you found out that Jobs had left Apple. On the one hand, he was relieved that "the terrorist was gone." On the other hand, she couldn't help but admire him greatly for the vision and momentum he brought to the company. He said that many other people felt the same way.

Once Jobs came back to Apple from NeXT (and Pixar), he had softened a bit, and that's what you see at the end of “Steve Jobs,” which I think matches the Mossberg experience. In short, Mossberg didn't know Jobs before and he was quite a different person.

None.

"Jobs" is a fantasy tale. It is the story of the legend of how Steve Jobs built Apple. But it ignores the real events so rudely, for anyone who knows the real story (I taught "History of the Personal Computer" in college), the movie is an embarrassment to anyone who really knows what the story was like.

"Steve Jobs" was also terrible. A one-dimensional side of Steve Jobs is shown. The man was very complex and had many sides. Sometimes he was the asshole in the movie. But sometimes he was an incredibly kind person. And sometimes he was cold, but other times he was totally excited. It's hard

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None.

"Jobs" is a fantasy tale. It is the story of the legend of how Steve Jobs built Apple. But it ignores the real events so rudely, for anyone who knows the real story (I taught "History of the Personal Computer" in college), the movie is an embarrassment to anyone who really knows what the story was like.

"Steve Jobs" was also terrible. A one-dimensional side of Steve Jobs is shown. The man was very complex and had many sides. Sometimes he was the asshole in the movie. But sometimes he was an incredibly kind person. And sometimes he was cold, but other times he was totally excited. It is difficult to show all those sides, but at the same time, it is unfair to show only its worst side.

So far, no movie beats "Pirates of Silicon Valley." While not 100% historically accurate, at least the description of the events is more true to reality and provides a good basis for understanding what actually happened. Plus, Noah Wyle's portrayal of Steve Jobs is second to none. Nobody grabbed the character like Noah Wyle did. It was amazing!

Michael Fassbender's movie.

Thanks for the A2A.

Pablo Picasso is widely quoted for saying that "good artists borrow, great artists steal."

Steve Jobs saw this and gave his paraphrased version, "Good artists copy, great artists steal."

Which one do people remember the most?

Of course, people might think this was all Steve's because they probably never heard of Picasso, and this is what Steve got really good at: stealing ideas.

He was a low-level technician while working for Atari and was known for not knowing much about coding. For that, he would pass the job on to his good friend Steve Wozniak, who was the creation behind the v

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Pablo Picasso is widely quoted for saying that "good artists borrow, great artists steal."

Steve Jobs saw this and gave his paraphrased version, "Good artists copy, great artists steal."

Which one do people remember the most?

Of course, people might think this was all Steve's because they probably never heard of Picasso, and this is what Steve got really good at: stealing ideas.

He was a low-level technician while working for Atari and was known for not knowing much about coding. For that, he would pass the job on to his good friend Steve Wozniak, who was the creation of the first Apple Mac.

Jobs saw his talent for getting people to do things for him, which I think everyone can definitely agree on.

Jobs also had a love affair with Japan and was infatuated with Sony and all the inventions, products and prototypes he saw there. This was probably the source of his inspiration and where he began his visions of Apple doing the same.

Now, having a vision and knowing how to implement it are two very different things. For the most part, Jobs was often wrong about a lot of things.

Like the first iphone:

Jobs was adamant about sticking with the click wheel design for the iPhone, but engineers suggested that a touchscreen was clearly the direction his competitors were heading and that they should be using it too. In the end, Jobs gave in to the touchscreen iPhone. This reveals his stubbornness to hang on to past successes rather than innovate or invent something new because he simply did not know the limits and potential of technologies.

Like when the first iPod came out, it was 1.9 cm thick. Jobs did what anyone would have suggested: make it smaller. That's not really a cool suggestion, but his persistence with his engineers to make things smaller or thinner made him seem like something of a tech whiz.

So no, he wasn't able to invent anything, nor was he a marketing genius.

As I mentioned earlier, he was great at getting talented people to do impossible things for him despite having no idea how to get them there.

Edit:

"The job theft quote was about drawing inspiration from things in nature, etc., not literally stealing someone else's work."

Jobs didn't have strong engineering skills (and Woz revealed this), so the only way forward for Apple was to really steal ideas.

Many of the features that ended up on the Apple Lisa came from Xerox, but even a genius like Woz couldn't figure out how they did it. So how did they do it? They had to buy the licenses from Xerox that provided all the blueprints, all they had to do was plug it in and play it on Lisa to use it. This is how Gates was also able to create Windows, he also had to learn through Xerox licenses.

Steve Jobs turned the presentations into an art form because he approached the main presentations like an artist. Musicians, actors, and designers master their craft for many hours - 10,000 hours, according to writers like Malcolm Gladwell. Mastering public speaking skills is no exception and Steve Jobs was an artist in the field.

In the new book, Becoming Steve Jobs, authors Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli reveal new insights into the intense preparation that made Steve Jobs a master presenter. According to the authors, "Steve would rehearse endlessly and tediously." The book contains excl

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Steve Jobs turned the presentations into an art form because he approached the main presentations like an artist. Musicians, actors, and designers master their craft for many hours - 10,000 hours, according to writers like Malcolm Gladwell. Mastering public speaking skills is no exception and Steve Jobs was an artist in the field.

In the new book, Becoming Steve Jobs, authors Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli reveal new insights into the intense preparation that made Steve Jobs a master presenter. According to the authors, "Steve would rehearse endlessly and tediously." The book contains exclusive behind-the-scenes photos of Jobs, alone on stage, reviewing the scripts the day before a MacWorld keynote. In another photo, Jobs is sitting on the side of the stage watching Apple Vice President Phil Schiller practice his part of a presentation. "The rehearsals for product presentations were always intense."

Bill Gates appeared at some of the events along with Jobs. "I was never in his league," Gates told the authors of Jobs' presentation skills. “I mean, it was just amazing to see how accurately he would rehearse. And if he's about to go on stage and his support people don't have it right, you know, he's really, really tough on them. He's even a little nervous because it's a great performance. But then it's on, and it's pretty amazing. "

Steve Jobs made introductions look easy because he tried so hard to get everything right.

"I mean, his whole thing of knowing exactly what he's going to say, but on stage saying it in such a way that he's trying to make you think he's thinking it right now ..." Gates said before trailing off and laughing. while remembering the moment.

The authors reveal new information about Jobs' 2005 commencement speech at Stanford, one of the most cited commencement speeches in modern history. Jobs wrote the speech himself and walked around the house for days, reciting it over and over again. “Children who see their father walk past them in the same kind of trance that he went into sometimes in the days before MacWorld. He read it to the whole family several times. "On the morning of June 16, 2005, Steve Jobs woke up with butterflies in his stomach." I've hardly ever seen him more nervous, "recalls Jobs' wife, Laurene. Jobs he was nervous because acting mattered to him and he wanted to do well.

Laurene also told the authors that the speech almost didn't happen when Jobs couldn't find the keys to the truck and the family was late to the stadium. Once they reached the scene, a guard did not quite believe that the man riding a shotgun, dressed in "ragged jeans, Birkenstocks and an old black T-shirt," was the graduation speaker.

When I started researching Steve Jobs and his presentation skills, I didn't think anyone could rehearse more diligently than him. That is, until I interviewed some of the most popular TED speakers. The speaker who has one of the most popular TED talks of all time, Dr. Jill Bolte-Taylor, told me that she rehearsed 200 times before delivering it in front of a TED audience. Dr. Jill's presentation seemed natural, authentic, lively, and conversational. Many people don't realize that it takes practice to sound conversational.

You can assume that a particular speaker is naturally talented, confident, and polished on stage. What you don't see is that it took them years of practice to get there. When I interviewed astronaut Chris Hadfield, who became a social media sensation with his weightless version of David Bowie's Space Oddity, I complimented him on his TED talk and the strength of his speech. "I've been talking for about 25 years," he reminded me.

Steve Jobs was not a natural speaker. He worked on it very, very hard. Although he had an early taste for the dramatic, as anyone who has seen him pull the first Macintosh out of a black bag can attest, there is no question that his comfort level on stage improved over time. He improved because he cared intensely about the message, the aesthetics, and the look of his brand.

Your brand, especially your personal brand, should mean as much to you as Apple did to Steve Jobs. And if Jobs was "meticulous" in all aspects of his presentations, shouldn't you be?

Jobs (2013)

When I first saw the trailer for the movie Jobs (2013), I was surprised to see how much Ashton Kutcher resembled Steve Jobs. He was excited for the movie. When I saw it, it was very disappointing. Throughout the entire movie, I felt like Ashton Kutcher was trying to be Steve Jobs. Not for an instant did I think it was Steve Jobs. This is not to say that you did a bad job or something like that.

This film portrays the life of Steve Jobs along with the history of Apple. If you read Walter Issacson's biography of Steve Jobs, there isn't much for you in this movie. The whole movie seems to be written pri

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Jobs (2013)

When I first saw the trailer for the movie Jobs (2013), I was surprised to see how much Ashton Kutcher resembled Steve Jobs. He was excited for the movie. When I saw it, it was very disappointing. Throughout the entire movie, I felt like Ashton Kutcher was trying to be Steve Jobs. Not for an instant did I think it was Steve Jobs. This is not to say that you did a bad job or something like that.

This film portrays the life of Steve Jobs along with the history of Apple. If you read Walter Issacson's biography of Steve Jobs, there isn't much for you in this movie. The whole movie seems to be written primarily to show him as a hero. This is not a terrible movie.


Steve Jobs (2015)

This film is set around the events that take place behind the scenes of three product launches. It's a smart movie that is very well written (by Aaron Sorkin). Danny Boyle took a smart approach to this movie after acknowledging that most people today know Jobs's story. So, he chose to explore what turned Steve Jobs into Steve Jobs.

Instead of sticking to what Steve Jobs did (which we all know), explore why Steve Jobs did what he did. This movie tries to make us see through the eyes of Steve Jobs. This makes for an interesting watch. Micheal Fassbender is great as Steve Jobs. Although he didn't look much like Jobs, in the movie you always feel like you're seeing the real Steve Jobs.


Steve Jobs is clearly a much better movie than Jobs, but I think that people who don't know the life of Steve Jobs or the history of Apple may have a hard time following it, much less enjoying the Steve Jobs movie. For them, Jobs is a better movie.

Edit: In January 2019, the California DMV began requiring that all vehicles bought or rented from dealerships have temporary plates with identification codes instead of the generic "dealer plates." So Jobs could no longer get away with it if it happened today.

He replaced cars every 6 months, but not for the reason you stated.

California vehicle laws stipulate that anyone with a new car has a maximum of six months to affix a license plate to their vehicle. Jobs, according to ITWire, used this loophole to avoid putting a plate in his car.

"Jobs made an arr

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Edit: In January 2019, the California DMV began requiring that all vehicles bought or rented from dealerships have temporary plates with identification codes instead of the generic "dealer plates." So Jobs could no longer get away with it if it happened today.

He replaced cars every 6 months, but not for the reason you stated.

California vehicle laws stipulate that anyone with a new car has a maximum of six months to affix a license plate to their vehicle. Jobs, according to ITWire, used this loophole to avoid putting a plate in his car.

"Jobs made an agreement with the leasing company; he would always switch cars during the sixth month of the lease, swapping a silver Mercedes SL55 AMG for an identical one," revealed author David Heath. "At no point would I be in a car that was only six months old and therefore there was no legal requirement to install the license plates."

Steve Jobs stayed tag-free by renting a new car every six months

Why Steve Jobs Didn't Have License Plates

Now, you may have replaced some cars long before 6 months, for whatever reason, but you always replaced them before 6 months.

In fact, he lived in a fairly modest house in a "normal" neighborhood. Everything is relative; lived in Palo Alto. A friend of mine lived a few houses away. Jobs's house didn't stand out much compared to the houses that surrounded it, and it was just another suburban neighborhood (especially when he lived there - prices have gone crazy now, like everywhere else around here). You may have cared about the scratches, I don't know. But it didn't seem to matter much to him where he lived.

Well… I saw the movie when it first came out. I saw footage before the movie came out and after all the editing I was disappointed in the script and there seemed to be a lack of passion and enthusiasm on the part of Kutcher and who he was playing in the movie.

Many stars, when they read a script and get into a movie, they really embrace the character and understand how they lived, breathed and embraced what that person was trying to do or be in life.

Steve for many was a GOD. To his friends like me, he was Steve. He was very human. Kutcher couldn't even imagine how much love he had.

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Well… I saw the movie when it first came out. I saw footage before the movie came out and after all the editing I was disappointed in the script and there seemed to be a lack of passion and enthusiasm on the part of Kutcher and who he was playing in the movie.

Many stars, when they read a script and get into a movie, they really embrace the character and understand how they lived, breathed and embraced what that person was trying to do or be in life.

Steve for many was a GOD. To his friends like me, he was Steve. He was very human. Kutcher couldn't even imagine the amount of love Steve had for Apple, for the products, for the users of the products, and for the future of what Apple would be like when he left this life.

So the script was lacking in some elements, some accessories were really bad, especially the glasses that he wore as the most up-to-date Steve, and yes, the smallest things really do make a difference and that is something that was very present in Steve's life. Jobs. DETAILS. If you leave out the details, people will notice and remember.

He had rented the movie thinking he would see it and buy it to add to a collection. I never did it. That's how memorable it was for me.

But that's my opinion.

Peace (look at the glasses) - Steve on the left, me on the right

The only data available on Steve Jobs' watch that I can find so far is the revelation of Jay Elliot, a former vice president of Apple Computer (Jay Elliot and William L. Simon, Steve Jobs: Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish; 2011) that in In the early days of Apple Computer, Steve Jobs not only wore a $ 2,000 Porsche watch, but he also kept an entire box in his office. Every time someone noticed and appreciated his watch, he gave them the watch he was wearing and then walked out of his office with the same watch.

I have not been able to find a photo of the respective Porsche watch, but below are p

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The only data available on Steve Jobs' watch that I can find so far is the revelation of Jay Elliot, a former vice president of Apple Computer (Jay Elliot and William L. Simon, Steve Jobs: Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish; 2011) that in In the early days of Apple Computer, Steve Jobs not only wore a $ 2,000 Porsche watch, but he also kept an entire box in his office. Every time someone noticed and appreciated his watch, he gave them the watch he was wearing and then walked out of his office with the same watch.

I have not been able to find a photo of the respective Porsche watch, but below are pictures of the newer Porsche watches that may give some clues as to why Steve Jobs loved the Porsche watch:


What type and brand of watch did you like after the first few years? At the launch of Piaget's Altiplano Skeleton watch on October 27, 2011, Piaget CEO Philippe Léopold-Metzge said that the watch (the world's thinnest automatic watch, with a 38-millimeter case diameter, gold 18-carat white, MSRP = 50,000 Swiss francs) would have been chosen by Steve Jobs as his watch, due to `` the extraordinary simplicity of the design. '' Considering the shape of Apple's newest products and the perfectionism of Steve Jobs, the speculation, at least for the type of watch, sounds plausible.

Image copyright: Piaget & Porsche Design

STEVE JOBS: WHAT HIS DEATH LAPENS TEACH US ABOUT HAPPINESS

“I reached the peak of success in the business world. In the eyes of others, my life is the epitome of success. However, apart from work, I have little joy. In the end, wealth is just a fact of life that I'm used to ”

Steve Jobs

Merry Christmas to all. Christmas isn't a joyous time for everyone, but no matter how you feel about the upcoming holidays (excited, romantic, lonely, irritated), cherish your time outside of life's grind to consider what matters most.

Steve Jobs, the man who seemed to have it all, said it pretty well from h

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STEVE JOBS: WHAT HIS DEATH LAPENS TEACH US ABOUT HAPPINESS

“I reached the peak of success in the business world. In the eyes of others, my life is the epitome of success. However, apart from work, I have little joy. In the end, wealth is just a fact of life that I'm used to ”

Steve Jobs

Merry Christmas to all. Christmas isn't a joyous time for everyone, but no matter how you feel about the upcoming holidays (excited, romantic, lonely, irritated), cherish your time outside of life's grind to consider what matters most.

Steve Jobs, the man who seemed to have it all, said it pretty well from his deathbed.

So pour yourself a cup of hot summit and soak up every nugget of wisdom in the words below, for those for whom time is short are the ones who truly see life as it is, how it should be lived and how not:

“In this moment, lying in the sickbed and looking back all my life, I realize that all the recognition and wealth of which I was so proud, have paled and become insignificant in the face of impending death.

In the dark, I look at the green lights of the life support machines and hear the mechanical hums, I can feel the breath of death approaching ...

Now I know, when we have accumulated enough wealth for life, we must devote ourselves to other matters that are not related to wealth ...

There should be something that is more important:

Maybe relationships, maybe art, maybe a dream of youth.

The continual pursuit of wealth will only turn a person into a twisted being, like me.

God gave us the senses to let us feel the love in everyone's heart, not the illusions caused by wealth.

The wealth that I have gained in my life I cannot bring. What I can bring back are only the memories precipitated by love.

Those are the true riches that will follow you, accompany you, give you strength and light to move forward.

Love can travel a thousand miles. Life has no limits. Go where you want to go. Reach the height you want to reach. Everything is in your heart and in your hands.

What is the most expensive bed in the world? The sickbed ...

You can hire someone to drive the car for you, earn money for you, but you can't have someone carry the disease for you.

Lost material things can be found. But there is one thing that can never be found when lost: life.

Whatever stage of life we ​​find ourselves in right now, we will eventually face the day the curtain falls.

Treasure the love for your family, the love for your spouse, the love for your friends.

Treat yourself well.

Appreciate others ”.

Steve Jobs scored a 32 on the ACT at a time when a 24 now equals a 28. According to Mensa, a 29 1 at that time is still a qualifying score for membership, so we can assume he's in the neighborhood of the 98th percentile. To get a 32, I assume you'd be in the neighborhood of a 35 today, which is currently at the 99.6 percentile 2. The correlations between standardized tests and IQ were much higher than they are today. The * recently * old SAT had a correlation as high as .86 3. Going through a conservative r of .82 from the old ACT to IQ and a 99.5 percentile score, we find:

math (0.82) * (. 995i → 2.576 SD) / math

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Footnotes

1 Qualifying test scores 2 How many people score 34, 35, 36 on the ACT? Score breakdown 3 https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/ps/Frey.pdf?origin=publication_detail (https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/ps/Frey.pdf?origin=publication_detail )

Steve Jobs scored a 32 on the ACT at a time when a 24 now equals a 28. According to Mensa, a 29 1 at that time is still a qualifying score for membership, so we can assume he's in the neighborhood of the 98th percentile. To get a 32, I assume you'd be in the neighborhood of a 35 today, which is currently at the 99.6 percentile 2. The correlations between standardized tests and IQ were much higher than they are today. The * recently * old SAT had a correlation as high as .86 3. Going through a conservative r of .82 from the old ACT to IQ and a 99.5 percentile score, we find:

mathematics (0.82) * (. 995i → 2.576 SD) = 2.112 SD = / mathematics

  • 132 WAIS / WISC
  • 151 Cattel
  • 134 Stanford-Binet

A bit of pseudo data, but that's a nice lower bound for your IQ.

Personally, I would put it in the 140 - 150 WAIS range due to its financial success. There is a correlation between the two, but I think this already gives you a good estimate. Feel free to vote and I will perform that calculation.

EDIT:

Due to the surprising number of upvotes, this is a breakdown of Steve Jobs' IQ as predicted from financial success.

At the beginning of the year of his death, Steve Jobs was worth $ 8.3 billion 4 "tying him up" as the 110th richest person in the world. The world population reached 7 billion at the end of the same year. 5 With that kind of rarity we find:

math 110 / 7,000,000,000 ≈ 0.99999998428i → 5.6535 SD / math

Yes, "wow"

We have two options for r:

  1. A published superior meta-analysis 6
  2. Two recent unpublished meta-analyzes 7 8

The first findings:

mathematics (0.23) * (5.6535 SD) ≈ 1.3 SD / mathematics

  • 121 WAIS / WISC
  • 132 Cattel
  • 120 Stanford-Binet

The two seconds (.49 and .48) find:

mathematics (0.485) * (5.6535 SD) ≈ 2.74 SD / mathematics

  • 141 WAIS / WISC
  • 166 Cattel
  • 144 Stanford-Binet

At these higher levels of net worth, income is proportional to wealth. We have few kings hoarding their heaps of treasures, disappearing from existence. Old Warren Buffett is as competitive as ever. Even Arab oil magnates experience a mildly meritocratic intelligence selection: they continue to invest and expand into renewable technologies, etc. Obviously, the ratio is not solid; so take note of that.

Steve Jobs was without a doubt a genius. Pristine intelligence is necessary to achieve innovation and success on a global scale. But… I think to myself of all the times Steve dropped acid, all his adventures in India, the luck of his birth in The Valley, his astute emotional clairvoyance, and his dedication to merit.

This is what made Steve Jobs, Steve Jobs.

EDIT: grammar

Footnotes

1 Qualifying test scores 2 How many people score 34, 35, 36 on the ACT? Score breakdown 3 https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/ps/Frey.pdf?origin=publication_detail (https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/ps/Frey.pdf?origin=publication_detail ) 4 The World's Billionaires 2011 - Forbes.com 5 Seven Billion Day - Wikipedia 6 http://www.emilkirkegaard.dk/en/wp-content/uploads/Intelligence-and-socioeconomic -success-A- meta-analytic-review-of-longitudinal-research.pdf 7 The Incredible Correlation Between IQ and Income 8 IQ and Permanent Income: Assessing the "IQ Paradox intellectual"

No, none of Jobs' 4 children are associated with Apple. His son, Reed, became interested in medicine from a young age after seeing his illustrious father fight cancer in the last years of his life. Steve Jobs himself was of the opinion that the next revolution will occur at the intersection of medicine and technology, just as it did at the intersection of technology and the humanities during its early years.

Their oldest daughter, Lisa, is a writer, while Erin and Eve are probably still in school. It's worth noting that Steve found a lot of himself in Eve: the famous temperament and firmness.

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No, none of Jobs' 4 children are associated with Apple. His son, Reed, became interested in medicine from a young age after seeing his illustrious father fight cancer in the last years of his life. Steve Jobs himself was of the opinion that the next revolution will occur at the intersection of medicine and technology, just as it did at the intersection of technology and the humanities during its early years.

Their oldest daughter, Lisa, is a writer, while Erin and Eve are probably still in school. It's worth noting that Steve found a lot of himself in Eve - the famous temperament and steadfastness that the Apple founder was known for.

He never imagined that his children would replace him and wanted them to have a normal childhood.

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