Which is better, submitting a job application through a recruiter or through an internal referral from my old colleague?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Bryce Ramos



Which is better, submitting a job application through a recruiter or through an internal referral from my old colleague?

I have been a recruiter for over twenty years and by far the best way to have your resume considered, and seriously considered, is by internal referral. The more senior the person making the referral, the more weight the referral also has.

If your former colleague knows the actual manager you are hiring, you may want him to send the resume to the manager, not the recruiter. Then, if the manager is interested, you can forward your resume to the recruiter for an initial evaluation (or to go straight to the interview stage!).

Your former colleague may also include some words of re

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I have been a recruiter for over twenty years and by far the best way to have your resume considered, and seriously considered, is by internal referral. The more senior the person making the referral, the more weight the referral also has.

If your former colleague knows the actual manager you are hiring, you may want him to send the resume to the manager, not the recruiter. Then, if the manager is interested, you can forward your resume to the recruiter for an initial evaluation (or to go straight to the interview stage!).

Your former colleague may also include a few reference words when submitting your resume, and that will definitely carry more weight than a semi-anonymous application via the career page / web portal.

It is better to do both. References tend to get more attention and often get interviews if they're qualified, but in any large organization, there are jobs your former colleague won't know and managers they won't.

Internal bypass is always good. But if you were approached by a recruiter, the recruiter is already in contact with the hiring manager and that helps too.

If the recruiter introduces himself as a third party, the chances are very slim.

An internal bypass is almost always better. When you go that route, you are using "networks" to get a job.

I think I've read that there is research showing that "networking" will get you a new job faster than anything else, except accidentally falling into the attention of hiring managers.

The internal referral is much better because it is directly related to the reputation of the sender. Nobody wants to be the guy you referred to an idiot. ;-)

It is from a cultural perspective the best source of new employees.

What's interesting about all of these recruiter responses is the assumption that the candidate is being "unprofessional" and is trying to take the recruiter's fee away. I fully understand that if an organization has hired a recruiter in the first place, they have already set their sights on recruiting through that route, and fee evasion (if possible in the long run) is not a priority, and therefore In and of itself, it is not worth the risk of upsetting the recruiter.

That being said, I have a recruiter who approached me about a position, he had a phone call with me to guide me through the position.

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What's interesting about all of these recruiter responses is the assumption that the candidate is being "unprofessional" and is trying to take the recruiter's fee away. I fully understand that if an organization has hired a recruiter in the first place, they have already set their sights on recruiting through that route, and fee evasion (if possible in the long run) is not a priority, and therefore In and of itself, it is not worth the risk of upsetting the recruiter.

That said, I have a recruiter who approached me about a position, had a phone call with me to walk me through the job profile, received my CV, was even more interested in a good fit, and asked to set up a follow-up. -You can call me to guide the recruiter through my CV and positioning for the client. The recruiter did not show up for the scheduled appointment, he emailed me 10 minutes late to tell me he was having a hectic day, could you call me tomorrow afternoon? The next day, there is no call. Now who is being "unprofessional"? I am in good judgment to reach out to the hiring manager directly via LinkedIn to tell him, look, pay these yahoos if you want; of course, they deserve credit for making us aware of each other.

Similarly, recruiters approached me repeatedly that they were very excited about me as an ideal candidate, but dropped out of line as soon as they learned that I would require a work visa extension, which automatically sets a 4-week turnaround time and some title. risk in hiring. I fully believe that the clients in these cases never saw my CV. The recruiter had done what the client hired him to do (found an ideal candidate for the position), but withheld my CV so as not to outshine other less-qualified candidates who would nonetheless result in faster and easier hiring and the recruiter will be paid more. quickly.

Let's face it folks - recruiters work for themselves and are paid by the hiring manager when hiring is done. That everything is fine and well; when it works properly, recruiters are helpful and efficient in the job market. But make no mistake, it is a numbers game; roles and recruits are simply earned for them. When the recruiter is unprofessional, incompetent, or clearly puts his own interests above the hiring manager, I think it's okay to step in and "ease" things a bit so that the client has a fair chance on the best candidate. Don't worry, recruiters. They will still pay you. The worst that could happen is being exposed as unprofessional and / or incompetent, and for putting your own interest before that of your client. And in my opinion that's a good thing. For the customer's sake ... and yours.

Ok then, generally "no".

However, many of those groups of resumes that are collected are analyzed by a computer and sorted according to the matching phrases in the resume. So it doesn't HURT to ask for them, and you may occasionally get your resume randomly by an HR person if you use buzzwords on your resume. Then you need to make it easily scannable in 10 seconds (because if it doesn't catch your eye in 10 seconds, they are launching it).

But it's ridiculously irresponsible to bet on that. You must have a LinkedIn profile that is updated and active that you take advantage of with recruiters and contact

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Ok then, generally "no".

However, many of those groups of resumes that are collected are analyzed by a computer and sorted according to the matching phrases in the resume. So it doesn't HURT to ask for them, and you may occasionally get your resume randomly by an HR person if you use buzzwords on your resume. Then you need to make it easily scannable in 10 seconds (because if it doesn't catch your eye in 10 seconds, they are launching it).

But it's ridiculously irresponsible to bet on that. You should have an up-to-date and active LinkedIn profile that you leverage with recruiters and contacts. You should also mention to your friends and co-workers that you are looking for (if you don't say anything about your job search, how in the world do you expect to get referrals?).

You should also do a lot of research on the hiring manager's emails. Look for guides on this. You practically stalk them all over the internet, oddly enough. Because you need information before you send them an email. If you send them a cold-stored email, they'll likely delete it right away. You need to know WHAT THEY ARE LOOKING FOR, or at least be able to tailor your email directly to the position and needs of the manager. Some people call this a "pain card." Find out how to write one.

Lastly, the “resume” you email to the contacts you get (whether it's on your own, through friends, or social media) should probably not be the same as the one you send to sites. Also, whenever you are submitted to a site, you should try to do your best to speak to someone to have your resume manually reviewed.

There are people who never have a problem finding work. The reason is because they know how to look and are not shy about it. I'd say you have some homework to do. Do it! Applying without networking is a fool's game and will give you a fool's salary and career options. You deserve more than that.

It depends on the internal recruiter.

I have seen recruiters who have greatly appreciated the recommendation because it helped them find someone who was not on their radar, while there have been times when I have seen recruiters who deliberately refuse to contact said candidate because they feel that if they (or their immediate circle) did not find that person, they cannot be good.

Fortunately, there are more of the first group than the second. Personally, I think companies should fire recruiters from the second group, as they are clearly more concerned about their

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It depends on the internal recruiter.

I have seen recruiters who have greatly appreciated the recommendation because it helped them find someone who was not on their radar, while there have been times when I have seen recruiters who deliberately refuse to contact said candidate because they feel that if they (or their immediate circle) did not find that person, they cannot be good.

Fortunately, there are more of the first group than the second. Personally, I think companies should fire recruiters in the second group as they are clearly more concerned with their egos than helping their companies find the best available talent, but that's a totally different topic.

That said, there are people who swear that being referred for a job will increase your chances of landing a job. In fact, I saw someone on LinkedIn who claimed some bogus statistics saying that referrals will help, maybe in the past, but unless you have a very close relationship with the hiring manager and you know exactly what you are looking for, getting a referral does. little. to give you an advantage. I know this from personal experience from companies that have told me their HR departments that they take employee referrals seriously (eg, Google, VMware).

I have used this "trick" quite often.

I will send my resume through the traditional method (through the company website). I'll also use LinkedIn and Jigsaw to send emails to people who are in HR and people who are in that particular department that I'm interested in. Sometimes if it's a smaller company I will email a lot of random people in the company with a personal email asking them to put my resume on the hiring manager's desk. Sometimes the person will forward my resume via email and sometimes the person will actually put the resume on the HR Manager's desk. So far, that has worked in my favor. HR is appreciated

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I have used this "trick" quite often.

I will send my resume through the traditional method (through the company website). I'll also use LinkedIn and Jigsaw to send emails to people who are in HR and people who are in that particular department that I'm interested in. Sometimes if it's a smaller company I will email a lot of random people in the company with a personal email asking them to put my resume on the hiring manager's desk. Sometimes the person will forward my resume via email and sometimes the person will actually put the resume on the HR Manager's desk. So far, that has worked in my favor. HR appreciates the number of people who mentioned my name to them. While one may think that bombing HR is bad, HR. H H. you are looking for an interested and qualified candidate to fill the position. Sometimes HR can overlook someone and in this way,

It is true that most professional companies would have a particular form for a referring employee to fill out to recommend someone. The best way to see if you can still get the referral, even if you've already applied, is to give it a try.

If it may be the case that the system does not accept the recommendation, the employee who wants to recommend it must make the effort personally. They should be able to easily send an email or make a call to the manager in question and explain that you are someone they want to recommend and recommend.

That employee is most likely not entitled to a "referral bonus" on this

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It is true that most professional companies would have a particular form for a referring employee to fill out to recommend someone. The best way to see if you can still get the referral, even if you've already applied, is to give it a try.

If it may be the case that the system does not accept the recommendation, the employee who wants to recommend it must make the effort personally. They should be able to easily send an email or make a call to the manager in question and explain that you are someone they want to recommend and recommend.

Most likely, that employee is not entitled to a "referral bonus" in this case, but they can still help you get in the door with that personal recommendation.

I work with hundreds of clients each year for career counseling and outplacement services. Although I don't know of any figures related to your specific question, I can say that this is roughly how most people find work:

60% - internal referral / contact
25% - recruiters found candidates online (LinkedIn, resume posted on job board, etc.)
10% - candidate cold applied directly to the job
5% - other

It also takes the average unemployed American approx. 8 and a half months to secure your next position; those who work with a professional resume writer and career coach more than half that time to 3-4 months

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I work with hundreds of clients each year for career counseling and outplacement services. Although I don't know of any figures related to your specific question, I can say that this is roughly how most people find work:

60% - internal referral / contact
25% - recruiters found candidates online (LinkedIn, resume posted on job board, etc.)
10% - candidate cold applied directly to the job
5% - other

It also takes the average unemployed American approx. 8 and a half months to secure your next position; those who work with a professional resume writer and career coach more than half that time to 3-4 months.

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