Which is better, an online master's degree from one of the best universities or a regular degree from a no-name university?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Oliver Hunt



Which is better, an online master's degree from one of the best universities or a regular degree from a no-name university?

First, I need to ask:

What is one of the best universities?
What is a university without a name?

Let me give two examples. One college that doesn't seem to get a lot of attention when people talk about the "best colleges" is Arizona State University. And yet, ASU has one of the top-rated programs for computer science and software engineering. The same is true for the University of Illinois and Washington State University. Additionally, each of these colleges has online classes to supplement their curriculum and attract students who might not otherwise be able to attend.

Are we talking about private universities like H

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First, I need to ask:

What is one of the best universities?
What is a university without a name?

Let me give two examples. One college that doesn't seem to get a lot of attention when people talk about the "best colleges" is Arizona State University. And yet, ASU has one of the top-rated programs for computer science and software engineering. The same is true for the University of Illinois and Washington State University. Additionally, each of these colleges has online classes to supplement their curriculum and attract students who might not otherwise be able to attend.

Are we talking about private universities like Harvard, Stanford, et al? If that's the case, then it would offer that many public universities are better and that the faculty, including full professors, come from many of the public universities like the University of Texas at Austin.

It would also challenge you to look at the rank of CEO titles in the Fortune 100. Only a few attended an Ivy League school. You can find that in a Google search.

Now, let's consider the value of an online title.

Generally (and yes, there are exceptions), the degree that one has obtained through online classes reads the same as if they had attended classes in a conventional classroom. So if you go to a state university that has strong programs, it doesn't really matter to a hiring manager (like me) whether the courses were online or in a brick-and-mortar store.

Seriously, I'm more interested in if you have the attitude and aptitude to join my team, collaborate effectively, and deliver products and services in accordance with my statement of work.

I don't know if I'm alone, but I characterize online titles as cheap and easy answers. That means I think I think you would learn more than “a regular 'no-name' college degree”. I have a history with one. I have never adopted an online or extension program or otherwise irregular degrees as equivalent to a live experience of sitting in a classroom with other people and a teacher's degree. In any case, I don't know of a legitimate MA or MS that doesn't require a BA or BS first. You may find that you just can't break the rules. Be careful with quick and easy answers.

It depends on what your goals are, but in general, online from a university with a positive reputation is worth more than an unknown university.

Part of what a title represents is brand and status. What you learned and how you learned it is negligible compared to the brand name.

Now, if it's the college experience and being on campus you're interested in, even an unfamiliar college will offer a better experience than an online one.

Please note that I work and teach at an online university and have done so for 20 years. I am not prejudiced against the Internet, in fact I prefer to teach online and take

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It depends on what your goals are, but in general, online from a university with a positive reputation is worth more than an unknown university.

Part of what a title represents is brand and status. What you learned and how you learned it is negligible compared to the brand name.

Now, if it's the college experience and being on campus you're interested in, even an unfamiliar college will offer a better experience than an online one.

Please note that I work and teach at an online university and have done so for 20 years. I don't have a bias against the internet, in fact I prefer to teach online and take classes online ... but the issue here is not about the academic experience in class.

I don't know what you mean by a "nameless" university. It seems to reflect an attitude, as I don't know of any unnamed university. There are 3,000 4-year colleges and universities in the US, and while only a few can be considered "top tier," most will provide a competitive education with an online degree.
The relative benefits will depend mainly on your maturity.

An online title. I only know the business world and especially the online MBA world, but I think there is no doubt that going to a better school and being with better students and professors is always preferable to a nameless university. Brand matters, luckily or unfortunately. Just look at the student satisfaction levels of online MBA program graduates that are ranked:

Online MBA with the Best Student Satisfaction Scores | Poets and Quants

A degree is only as useful as the skills you have acquired in the program. Focus on the mode of delivery and the skills you hope to acquire. A title alone is of no use.

As someone who has earned an advanced degree from a respected public institution, and who would never personally consider Liberty as an educational option, I have a personal vision for Liberty. A friend chose it to meet a single course prerequisite because of its high tuition price for veterans. He had no knowledge of the history / reputation or religious nature of Liberty and chose it based on the tuition break. Johns Hopkins explicitly listed Liberty as one of many schools offering a course that would fulfill a prerequisite for its doctoral program. As I had already taken this course

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As someone who has earned an advanced degree from a respected public institution, and who would never personally consider Liberty as an educational option, I have a personal vision for Liberty. A friend chose it to meet a single course prerequisite because of its high tuition price for veterans. He had no knowledge of the history / reputation or religious nature of Liberty and chose it based on the tuition break. Johns Hopkins explicitly listed Liberty as one of many schools offering a course that would fulfill a prerequisite for its doctoral program. Since he had already taken this course elsewhere, I helped him learn the material and became familiar with the teaching materials, philosophy, and instructional approach of Liberty.

Completed the 8-week online course during the pandemic. The textbook and learning materials for this math-related graduate course were respected and had no religious content. Unfortunately, there were no online lectures, except for a few short YouTube videos that attempted to provide guidance with assignments. Otherwise, self-directed tasks included reading assignments, completing chapter problems, quizzes, essays, a midterm and final exam, and creating a simple PowerPoint project. The only religious component noted was a panel discussion, where my friend was asked to write four topical essays and quote a passage from the Bible in each.

Liberty provided efficient and reliable access to its online educational materials and prompt technical support. Liberty has a HUGE online enrollment, but it also seems to manage it well and offers friendly, personal assistance when needed.

My final assessment is that the instructor and assistants were smart, friendly, and quick to help on the rare occasions we needed to contact them. Otherwise, this was a completely self-paced course with somewhat sloppily written test questions and problems, and lax grading practices. The virtual exams were unsupervised, they had no time restrictions, so no attempt was made to verify that the enrolled student was completing graded assignments. My friend got a good grade and his course transferred to his elementary school without a hitch. He learned a lot from me and the textbook, but sadly not much from Liberty.

Less technical courses may include more religious content, but I cannot offer any first-hand knowledge of this. As a biologist, I generally cannot recommend Liberty as an undergraduate option to prepare for an advanced science degree due to its fundamentalist bias towards creationism. Their degrees in applied health sciences (eg, nursing and public health) appear to be respected, if not noteworthy.

Many accredited colleges and universities offer online courses. Some of them offer fully online accredited degrees at various levels, including graduate degrees. The degree certificate and academic transcripts usually do not show how much or if some of the course work was taken online.

Furthermore, it is very common these days for accredited colleges and universities to REQUIRE online courses, either as a general requirement for graduation or specifically required for particular courses. Many courses in traditional colleges and universities are now hybrids, that is, they take place in part on a tra

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Many accredited colleges and universities offer online courses. Some of them offer fully online accredited degrees at various levels, including graduate degrees. The degree certificate and academic transcripts usually do not show how much or if some of the course work was taken online.

Furthermore, it is very common these days for accredited colleges and universities to REQUIRE online courses, either as a general requirement for graduation or specifically required for particular courses. Many traditional college and university courses are now hybrid, meaning they are taught in part in a traditional classroom, but online activities are also required. A popular trend these days (K-12 through graduate school) is assigning students most of the course work to be done online and using traditional seated physical class sessions for teachers to advise. students, answer questions, take tests, get involved with students. collaboration, etc.

It is also common for some courses to be optionally offered in a classroom or entirely online. For example, I took a Cloud Computing course at a graduate school in computer science and engineering. This course required the participation of ALL students, both in the physical classroom and those taking the course online, to participate together in interactive online class sessions.

Even many high schools require online education these days. For example, the state of Florida has a legal requirement that ALL high school students take at least one online course to qualify for graduation from traditional high school.

The advent of the Internet has vastly transformed and improved what used to be described as "distance education." There are benefits of online education these days that many traditionally educated people are simply unaware of, if they haven't been to school in the last decade. A personal example: my son's high school offers language instruction in Spanish and French only. However, he was able to meet his two-year language requirement by taking two years of Chinese study with Florida State Virtual School online. His course required frequent personal interaction with his Chinese teacher. Very few high schools can offer that.

My answer is: it depends. A good online program will be better than a bad face-to-face program. Similarly, a good student in a good online program will get more out of their experience than a bad student in a good classroom program.

Also, I have several things to say about it. Here they go:

  • If you want to investigate, I advise against it. I know of some great online programs, but research, particularly in some areas, requires close supervision and interaction with your supervisor.
  • Professional MAs lend themselves to online formats better than Research MAs.
  • "Universities" like DeVry,
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My answer is: it depends. A good online program will be better than a bad face-to-face program. Similarly, a good student in a good online program will get more out of their experience than a bad student in a good classroom program.

Also, I have several things to say about it. Here they go:

  • If you want to investigate, I advise against it. I know of some great online programs, but research, particularly in some areas, requires close supervision and interaction with your supervisor.
  • Professional MAs lend themselves to online formats better than Research MAs.
  • Most academics don't consider actual universities like DeVry, U of Phoenix, and Walden. I'd say don't even consider them.
  • If you can find a hybrid program, go for it. Some programs have face-to-face summers and long semesters online. Some institutions have intensive summer programs where you spend two summers on campus.
  • Your diploma does not read "online" on it. In other words, no one needs to know. (Edit: thanks David Long for pointing out that some diplomas include the word "online"). However, your transcripts probably will ... in case someone asks for them.
  • If you just want to learn, think about open courses. Coursera, for example, is an option. Many of your courses can be put into an online master's degree.
  • If you choose to enroll in an MA online, stay active, follow the calendar, and stay in touch with your cohort partners and your teachers. You will feel like you are part of a learning community and that will show when you talk about your title - and that is taken seriously.
  • If you can, get together with other cohort partners in real life. It will give you a sense of partnership that will come in handy when the final comes around.

The value (value) is based on the utility / purpose / objective of the activity. In the context of higher education, what is the purpose of obtaining a degree?

Most people follow human nature and think that everyone else is motivated by the same purposes as them ... so they don't stop to clarify the purpose of others.

Most people today focus on the value of a degree for career advancement.

There is also a purpose in personal fulfillment.

Some people want to learn something and grow as a person. Traditional liberal arts programs build on this purpose.

I'm sure there are other reasons to get a degree but

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The value (value) is based on the utility / purpose / objective of the activity. In the context of higher education, what is the purpose of obtaining a degree?

Most people follow human nature and think that everyone else is motivated by the same purposes as them ... so they don't stop to clarify the purpose of others.

Most people today focus on the value of a degree for career advancement.

There is also a purpose in personal fulfillment.

Some people want to learn something and grow as a person. Traditional liberal arts programs build on this purpose.

I'm sure there are other reasons to get a degree, but let's start with those three.

Career advancement takes two forms.

First, some professions require a specific title. It's hard to become an accountant without an accounting degree ... and certainly not a CPA. Engineering is another area in which employers tend to demand the degree as the price of admission.

Second, many employers use a title that has a filter when selecting candidates. It doesn't matter what its title is, just that it has a title.

Online impacts each of these differently.

Some programs are not available online. For example, the American Bar Association prides itself on preventing online law programs from getting approved. The American Psychological Association does the same for clinical psychology. Counseling, on the other hand, can be done online but with some traditional clinical experiences. If you want to become a professional in some fields, an online degree will not be available or will not be widely accepted.

For most people, the problem is simply having a title. In those cases, an online degree may be equivalent to a traditional degree, but it depends on the employer. Employers can discount a degree simply based on the school. Some employers may discount an online degree. The way to minimize this is to go to a school that has a campus and online programs. That way, the employer who is biased will never know.

Research shows that online learning is just as effective as traditional learning. From a learning perspective, an online program is worth as much as it is not online.

Now, if your purpose is to have a transformative college experience, an online program is less effective. The traditional college experience has less to do with courses and more to do with personal relationships and activities outside of class. When you are part of a residential community where you live, play and study together, it is a different experience than just taking classes. I don't know of fraternities that do a virtual career… and if they did, I doubt it would be the same as the traditional experience. In this context, an online degree is not worth it.

In other words, whether or not an online degree is worth it depends on what you hope to get out of it.

First of all: I really believe in online education!

I personally learned many things with the help of online courses.

Second, distance learning / e-learning / online education (whatever you call it) reduces barriers to accessing higher education for many people around the world.

Pros and cons

Online education will suit many people, but it is definitely not for everyone. These advantages and disadvantages of online courses should help you decide whether or not you want to go through such a university.

Pros:

• Accessible

• Save time

• Flexible schedule

• Prepares you to work on a digital in the d

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First of all: I really believe in online education!

I personally learned many things with the help of online courses.

Second, distance learning / e-learning / online education (whatever you call it) reduces barriers to accessing higher education for many people around the world.

Pros and cons

Online education will suit many people, but it is definitely not for everyone. These advantages and disadvantages of online courses should help you decide whether or not you want to go through such a university.

Pros:

• Accessible

• Save time

• Flexible schedule

• Prepares you to work in a digital market in the digital

• Gives you access to many courses that are not available at your local colleges.

• Allows you to study without interruptions, even if you have to travel a lot

Cons:

• It requires a lot of discipline

• Reduction of interaction with professionals.

• Reduced interaction with other students

• Employers may not find your authentic documents

Online Business School

I believe that there are several programs that offer online degrees, such as a bachelor's or a master's degree.

I am quite familiar with the Online Business School (OBS) program in Coventry, UK.

  • They offer bachelor's and master's degrees online,
  • OBS is open to students from all over the world,
  • you just need to be at least 18 years old and have an A-level high school degree,
  • OBS offers 6 undergraduate courses for £ 1,800 each (equivalent to year 1 + 2)
  • In addition, online recharge at the university for the third year with a price of approx. £ 3,000
  • Total Price to Obtain a Bachelor's Degree Online: Less than £ 5,000

Available courses:

  • Business Administration
  • Accounting and Finance
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Leadership and teamwork
  • IT and IT
  • Hotel and hospitality

I show you a path to an academic degree with the Online Business School. And you get a 10% discount on the course fee as soon as you enroll there for your first level course with my discount code: online520


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