Which college degree is most likely to land a steady income job?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Bethany Carson



Which college degree is most likely to land a steady income job?

You are probably too young to remember the Great Recession of 2008.

Many students who graduated from college amid the headwinds of that financial recession never found their footing. (I have a study that shows that 51% of recent college graduates were underemployed or unemployed in 2011.)

The COVID-19 health crisis is much, much worse.

US Unemployment Claims Top 40 Million - Live Business Updates

In “normal” times, teens and their parents underestimate the risks of going to college.

In "normal" times, only one in three enrolls, graduates, and gets a job that requires a college degree.

THESE ARE NOT NORMAL TIMES

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You are probably too young to remember the Great Recession of 2008.

Many students who graduated from college amid the headwinds of that financial recession never found their footing. (I have a study that shows that 51% of recent college graduates were underemployed or unemployed in 2011.)

The COVID-19 health crisis is much, much worse.

US Unemployment Claims Top 40 Million - Live Business Updates

In “normal” times, teens and their parents underestimate the risks of going to college.

In "normal" times, only one in three enrolls, graduates, and gets a job that requires a college degree.

THESE ARE NOT NORMAL TIMES.

Unless you're really, really “ready to book,” and you and your parents can put together a rock-solid college plan (see Note), you'd better come up with a Plan B.

Thomas B Walsh's answer to What is the most effective way to get a comfortably paying job without a college degree?

Note

Thomas B Walsh's answer to I'm going to college. What are some tips?

None.

Employers insist that almost all white-collar and office professionals have a bachelor's degree, and as a result, the average earnings for those with a bachelor's degree are much, much higher than those without.

However, employers don't really care much about academic details beyond "Do you have a bachelor's degree?" What matters to them is professional preparation. This is why a small subset of college graduates struggle - they either did not prepare for a career or they only prepared for a career that has few openings and low income levels.

If you want a white-collar office career, you must go to college, but you must

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None.

Employers insist that almost all white-collar and office professionals have a bachelor's degree, and as a result, the average earnings for those with a bachelor's degree are much, much higher than those without.

However, employers don't really care much about academic details beyond "Do you have a bachelor's degree?" What matters to them is professional preparation. This is why a small subset of college graduates struggle - they either did not prepare for a career or they only prepared for a career that has few openings and low income levels.

If you want a white-collar office career, you must go to college, but you must prepare for that career by starting your first semester on campus. It really is that simple; the people who make it more complex are simply fighting political agendas. Often times it is employers who insist that their employees have college degrees!

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