Which biography of Steve Jobs is the most accurate?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Benjamin Cook



Which biography of Steve Jobs is the most accurate?

Having read many of the existing ones, I would say that the official biography of Isaacson is quite balanced; if you need to choose only one, get Isaacson.

The latest offering, "Becoming Steve Jobs," offers little insight into his youth and founding period for Apple, concentrating on NeXT / Pixar and later Apple, and while valuable in providing context to popular vision but too simplistic of idiots / geniuses. , sometimes it turns into a love feast that rolls your eyes. It's no wonder Cook, Ive, and others love the latter as much as they manage to draw attention to them longer than in previous titles and

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Having read many of the existing ones, I would say that the official biography of Isaacson is quite balanced; if you need to choose only one, get Isaacson.

The latest offering, "Becoming Steve Jobs," offers little insight into his youth and founding period for Apple, concentrating on NeXT / Pixar and later Apple, and while valuable in providing context to popular vision but too simplistic of idiots / geniuses. , sometimes it turns into a love feast that rolls your eyes. It's no wonder Cook, Ive, and others love the latter so much, as they manage to draw attention to themselves for longer than in previous titles and thus get some of Steve's aura in themselves.

The longest answer is that, to get a good performance, you would need to read quite a few books, starting with "Apple Confidential" and "Insanely Great" (for the early Apple stories), then "The Second Coming of Steve Jobs" (for NeXT and the beginning of Apple's second term), then Issacson's "Becoming Steve Jobs" and "Steve Jobs".

And, to make it a little more interesting, you will find some snippets in "Fire in the Valley", "Zap!", "Accidental Empires", "Dealers of Lightning" and "iWoz", which also give context as they deal with the rest of emerging companies and personalities in the late seventies and early eighties.

My favorite "Steve Jobs by Walter Issacson". Despite my difficult schedule (you know, Mains, advanced, board exams, etc., etc., etc.) I couldn't resist reading this amazing bio.

Of many biographies I have read, Steve Jobs of Issacson is one of my favorites (after "autobiography of a yogi") and made me a fan of Steve Jobs. The precision and grace with which this book has been written, I think it is worth reading.

This Book itself conveys that how Steve Jobs, with all his efforts, tried to convince Walter Issacson to write about his life story (after reading the biography of Einstein written by Wa

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My favorite "Steve Jobs by Walter Issacson". Despite my difficult schedule (you know, Mains, advanced, board exams, etc., etc., etc.) I couldn't resist reading this amazing bio.

Of many biographies I have read, Steve Jobs of Issacson is one of my favorites (after "autobiography of a yogi") and made me a fan of Steve Jobs. The precision and grace with which this book has been written, I think it is worth reading.

This Book itself conveys how Steve Jobs, with all his efforts, tried to convince Walter Issacson to write about his life story (after reading Walter's biography of Einstein) and I think his efforts were not in vain. .

Its greatest achievement is that it connects you with the protagonist until the end. He tells you about his trip from

For

So I would end this answer with a simple quote;)

"People who are foolish enough to think they can change the world are the ones who do"

Pablo Picasso is widely quoted for saying that "good artists borrow, great artists steal."

Steve Jobs saw this and gave his paraphrased version, "Good artists copy, great artists steal."

Which one do people remember the most?

Of course, people might think this was all Steve's because they probably never heard of Picasso, and this is what Steve got really good at: stealing ideas.

He was a low-level technician while working for Atari and was known for not knowing much about coding. For that, he would pass the job on to his good friend Steve Wozniak, who was the creation behind the v

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Pablo Picasso is widely quoted for saying that "good artists borrow, great artists steal."

Steve Jobs saw this and gave his paraphrased version, "Good artists copy, great artists steal."

Which one do people remember the most?

Of course, people might think this was all Steve's because they probably never heard of Picasso, and this is what Steve got really good at: stealing ideas.

He was a low-level technician while working for Atari and was known for not knowing much about coding. For that, he would pass the job on to his good friend Steve Wozniak, who was the creation of the first Apple Mac.

Jobs saw his talent for getting people to do things for him, which I think everyone can definitely agree on.

Jobs also had a love affair with Japan and was infatuated with Sony and all the inventions, products and prototypes he saw there. This was probably the source of his inspiration and where he began his visions of Apple doing the same.

Now, having a vision and knowing how to implement it are two very different things. For the most part, Jobs was often wrong about a lot of things.

Like the first iphone:

Jobs was adamant about sticking with the click wheel design for the iPhone, but engineers suggested that a touchscreen was clearly the direction his competitors were heading and that they should be using it too. In the end, Jobs gave in to the touchscreen iPhone. This reveals his stubbornness to hang on to past successes rather than innovate or invent something new because he simply did not know the limits and potential of technologies.

Like when the first iPod came out, it was 1.9 cm thick. Jobs did what anyone would have suggested: make it smaller. That's not really a cool suggestion, but his persistence with his engineers to make things smaller or thinner made him seem like something of a tech whiz.

So no, he wasn't able to invent anything, nor was he a marketing genius.

As I mentioned earlier, he was great at getting talented people to do impossible things for him despite having no idea how to get them there.

Edit:

"The job theft quote was about drawing inspiration from things in nature, etc., not literally stealing someone else's work."

Jobs didn't have strong engineering skills (and Woz revealed this), so the only way forward for Apple was to really steal ideas.

Many of the features that ended up on the Apple Lisa came from Xerox, but even a genius like Woz couldn't figure out how they did it. So how did they do it? They had to buy the licenses from Xerox that provided all the blueprints, all they had to do was plug it in and play it on Lisa to use it. This is how Gates was also able to create Windows, he also had to learn through Xerox licenses.

1. When asked why he named his company Apple, he said, "Because it came before Atari in the phone book." Jobs worked for Atari before starting Apple and also said he likes apples and that they had to come up with a name at 5 o'clock that day.

Apple

2. Why were you fired from your own company? Everyone knows that in 1985 Steve Jobs was fired from Apple. Some might even know that it had to do with a dispute between Steve and John Sculley, Apple's CEO at the time, but few know exactly what the disagreement consisted of. Well Steve Jobs wanted to lower the price of the then underperforming

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1. When asked why he named his company Apple, he said, "Because it came before Atari in the phone book." Jobs worked for Atari before starting Apple and also said he likes apples and that they had to come up with a name at 5 o'clock that day.

Apple

2. Why were you fired from your own company? Everyone knows that in 1985 Steve Jobs was fired from Apple. Some might even know that it had to do with a dispute between Steve and John Sculley, Apple's CEO at the time, but few know exactly what the disagreement consisted of. Well, Steve Jobs wanted to lower the price of the underperforming Macintosh and transfer much of the advertising budget from Apple 2 to the Mac. Sculley disagreed. He argued that the price was not influencing the poor sales of the Macintosh, but rather the unimpressive software it ran. Sculley took the matter to the Apple Board of Directors, which sided with the former Pepsi CEO, firing Jobs.

3. "I'd rather sell dog shit than PC." In the mid-1990s, when NEXT crashed after failing to create a successful computer, Steve Jobs faced the daunting prospect of having to sell the software they had developed. "But Steve," said a friend, "why don't you just sell PCs?" Steve replied, "I'd rather sell dog shit than PC."

4. Before starting Apple, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built and sold digital blue boxes, a $ 100 computer that could hack into phone systems and allow them to make calls to any number in the world. One of the first calls they made using the blue box was to the Vatican with Wozniak posing as Henry Kissinger, asking to speak to the Pope. Unsuccessfully.

Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak

5. Steve Jobs calls one of life's mysteries how his friend and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak never built a floating point BASIC for the Apple II, despite the fact that Jobs had begged him for several weeks to do so . As a result of Wozniak's refusal, Job approached Microsoft to obtain the BASIC license from Bill Gates.

6. In the early 1980s, Steve Jobs visited Adobe Systems. Impressed with his technology, Jobs made an offer to Adobe co-founder Charles Geschke to buy the company and integrate it into Apple. Geschke rejected it. Apple and Adobe had a very good professional relationship until Steve's Apple, in the late 2000s, decided to ditch its commercially successful Adobe Flash mobile devices.

Movie poster "Anywhere But Here"

7. The movie "Anywhere But Here" starring Natalie Portman and Susan Sarandon was dedicated to him and was based on a book written by his sister Mona Simpson. The story is about a mother and daughter seeking success in Beverly Hills. Anywhere But Here is dedicated to "my brother Steve".

8. You took LSD in your youth and had no regrets. In an interview, Jobs called his drug experience "one of the two or three most important things I've ever done in my life." As Jobs himself has suggested, LSD may have contributed to the "think differently" approach that still puts Apple designs above the competition.

$ 1 dollar bill

9. Steve Jobs kept his salary at $ 1 since 1997, the year he became Apple's CEO. Of his salary, Jobs joked in 2007: "I get 50 cents a year for attending, and the other 50 cents is based on my performance."

10. Jobs dropped out of college. After graduating from Homestead High School in Cupertino, California, he went on to study at Reed College. He only took a semester of classes before dropping out. For the next 18 months, however, he continued to audit the classes that interested him.

Abdulfattah Jandali (Brochure)

11. Steve Jobs was biologically half Syrian Muslim. He was adopted and his biological father's name is Abdulfattah Jandali. His biological mother was Joanne Carole Schieble, an American. His father, however, opposed the marriage, so Steve was put up for adoption.

12. His parents were two graduate students who may not have been ready to have a child and gave him up for adoption. The only requirement his biological parents had was that he be adopted by two college-educated people. His adoptive parents were Clara and Paul Jobs.

Mona simpson

13. His biological parents had another daughter, Mona Simpson, whom he later met and connected with.

A plate with fish and vegetables (Source: Pixabay)

14. Jobs was a pescetario, which meant he ate fish but no other meat.

15. Jobs lied to Steve Wozniak. When they made Breakout for Atari, Wozniak and Jobs were going to split the pay 50-50. Atari gave Jobs $ 5,000 to do the job. He told Wozniak that he received $ 700, so Wozniak took home $ 350.

16. At the tender age of 12, Jobs asked William Hewlett, co-founder of Hewlett-Packard, for some parts to complete a school project. Hewlett offered Jobs an internship at his company.

Apple co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak (Credit: Reuters)

17. Jobs met Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak in high school when Jobs was 13 and Wozniak was 18.

18. Steve had a brief affair with Joan Boaz, the folk singer in her hippie days. Unfortunately, however, he left it for his favorite musician: Bob Dylan.

19. His full name is Steven Paul Jobs.

20. "We will lose our money, but at least we will have had a company." It is quite easy to fall into the error of thinking that in the creation of Apple, now one of the two largest companies in the world, the founders were these amazing visionaries full of conviction of success and their ability to change the world with the product they had created. Well, it certainly wasn't the case for Apple. In fact, both Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak were pretty sure how unlikely their chances of success were. "We will not see the money we have invested again," Wozniak said. Jobs replied, "Yes, we will lose our money, but at least we can say we had a company."

Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo Concept

21. "Let's hide our porsches." When an investor was visiting NEXT one day in the early 1990s, Steve Job ran into the parking lot to get his Porsche out of sight and had his employee Randy Adams do the same for his Porsche. "He'll think we have money if he sees the Porsche," Jobs said.

22. When he returned to Apple in the mid-1990s, Steve Jobs donated Apple's first computers, machines, and blueprints to Stanford University. Clean out the old to make room for the new. That was his way of leaving the past behind and embracing the future of a company that was in serious trouble at the time.

23. After the success of Apple II and the subsequent IPO, one of Apple's engineers went to Steve Jobs and told him that he would give shares to another employee if Jobs matched them. Jobs replied, "Yes, I will call it. I will give zero and you will give zero."

Buddhism (source: Pizabay)

24. His religion is Zen Buddhism. He went to India to meditate and learn about a simpler way of life.

25. He was very secretive about his marriage. His wife was Laurene Powell Jobs and they were married in Yosemite National Park on March 18, 1991.

Laurene Powell Jobs (Source: Reuters)

26. His wife graduated from Stanford with an MBA and was appointed by President Obama to be a member of the White House Council on Community Solutions because of her active involvement in the nonprofit community.

27. Despite his wife's work in the nonprofit sector, Jobs was not known for his charities. In Apple's early days, Jobs cut all of its philanthropic programs saying they would "wait until they were profitable." Although they never restarted their programs, they may have donated anonymously.

28. He denied the paternity of his first child, claiming that he was sterile. Initially, the mother had to raise the child on welfare checks. The boy turned out to be his daughter named Lisa.

Apple III "Lisa" computer (Source: Wikipedia)

29. As an ode to her daughter, she named the computer "Apple III" Lisa in honor of her firstborn. The mother is Chris-Ann Brennan.

30. The excitement you feel when you open a new Apple product is not accidental. Jobs was passionate about packaging, and a group at the company obsessively opened boxes in an attempt to elicit the right emotional response.

31. Apple had three founders, not two. The company was founded in 1976 by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ronald Wayne.

The first Apple logo (Source: Wikipedia)

32. The first Apple logo was produced by Ronald Wayne, who also wrote the original partnership agreement and manual for the Apple I computer. Unfortunately, he sold his 10% stake two weeks after the partnership for only $ 800.

Jonathan "Jony" Ive (Source: Flickr / marcopako)

33. Jobs didn't want to offer blank products. However, after designer Jonathan Ive showed him the “moon gray” shade, he was sold on it.

34. Steve Wozniak ended his full-time job in 1987. However, he is still an official Apple employee and receives a stipend estimated at $ 120,000 a year.

Pixar logo

35. Jobs bought Pixar Animation Studios from George Lucas in 1986.

Reed College Photo Brochure

36. Jobs attended Reed College in Portland, Oregon in 1972.

37. While working at Atari, Jobs was put on the night shift due to or lack of hygiene. It is said that he never bathed and walked barefoot around the office.

38. Jobs never used license plates on the silver Mercedes SL55 AMG he always drove.

Disabled parking sign (Source: Flickr / bobosh_t)

39. You would always park in the disabled parking zone.

40. Steve Jobs's GPA was 2.65 / 4, which is considered pretty mediocre. Jobs never considered himself a good student and instead preferred to learn in different ways and did not enjoy the structure of schools very much.

41. Steve Jobs's signature was inside every original Macintosh. Jobs would get the team to sign a sheet of paper that would become a model for a metal plate that would go inside every Macintosh computer.

42. His attention to detail was unlike anyone I'd ever seen. He frantically called a Google engineer one Sunday with an emergency - the slope on his O was slightly off course.

Larry Page and Sergey Brin (Google brochure)

43. Jobs acted as a mentor to Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page after seeing the potential for the company.

44. Jobs took Eric Schmidt, the eventual CEO of the company, as one of his board members at Apple.

Android Vs Apple Wallpaper

45. Jobs felt betrayed by his former Google trainees after the company entered the phone market with its Android devices. He said: "Apple didn't get into the search business, so why did Google get into the phone business?"

Apple iPhone (Apple brochure)

46. ​​Jobs believed that Google had stolen some of the iPhone's functions and decided to keep the development of the iPad a secret from Schmidt.

47. Older Apple laptops used to have the logo backwards. It was not a mistake, but an easy-to-use decision.

48. Apple I was the company's first computer and was priced at $ 666.66. Steve Wozniak priced it without realizing the devilish overtones, instead priced the machine a third above the wholesale price of $ 500 and preferred a repeated digit because it was easier to type.

Apple with Love Steve written on it (Source: Kimberly White / Reuters)

49. The Apple Macintosh computer was named after a real apple, the McIntosh, because it was the favorite variety of Jef Raskin (an Apple employee working on the Macintosh project).

Steve Jobs (Source: Flickr / marcopako)

50. After finishing a long battle with pancreatic cancer, Jobs's last words were "Oh wow. Oh wow. Oh wow" as he looked over his family's shoulders. Mona Simpson revealed this in her eulogy that was published in the New York Times.

The world has a problem. You get a job doing a task and it pays nothing, then you get a job doing a more difficult version of that task and it pays more, then you get a job managing a team of people who perform that task and it pays more, then you get a job managing the building that task and a bunch of others gets done and it pays more, then you get a job managing all the buildings in your area doing that task and it pays more, then you get a job managing the entire company and it pays more.

All of those jobs required different skill sets and only the first two have anything to do with what you originally signed on.

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The world has a problem. You get a job doing a task and it pays nothing, then you get a job doing a more difficult version of that task and it pays more, then you get a job managing a team of people who perform that task and it pays more, then you get a job managing the building that task and a bunch of others gets done and it pays more, then you get a job managing all the buildings in your area doing that task and it pays more, then you get a job managing the entire company and it pays more.

All of those jobs required different skill sets and only the first two have anything to do with what you originally signed up for. The rest are managerial and will require different skills depending on the type of company. The idea that the best person to run your business is the person who best provides the service your business provides is insane.

So let's take a look at Apple. Do you know which people are bad at managing a team of employees? Electronic engineers. You know what people are bad at finding out what people will like? Software engineers.

You need the right people to do the right jobs, and as a result, Jobs was pretty good at sitting on top and orchestrating everything for the future.

Let me put it another way, is Kevin Feige smart or does he employ smart people and take their ideas (eg The Russo Brothers)? He's not the person writing the scripts, he's not behind the camera, he's not editing, he's not an actor, but he's the reason the MCU has made all the money in the world rather than the original incarnation of the DCEU. or the Darkness. Universe.

The world will be a better place when we begin to value people for what they do well instead of forcing everyone to become managers.

★★★★★


Released just three weeks after his subject's death, Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs Biography is the definitive book on the man and his career. Isaacson himself has had an impressive career. His accomplishments include being the CEO of CNN and the editor-in-chief of TIME magazine, and he has written respected biographies of Henry Kissinger, Benjamin Franklin, and Albert Einstein. This pedigree prompted Steve Jobs himself to select and pursue Isaacson to be his official biographer. Jobs gave more than forty interviews to Isaacson and did not put conditions on the book (apart from the c

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★★★★★


Released just three weeks after his subject's death, Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs Biography is the definitive book on the man and his career. Isaacson himself has had an impressive career. His accomplishments include being the CEO of CNN and the editor-in-chief of TIME magazine, and he has written respected biographies of Henry Kissinger, Benjamin Franklin, and Albert Einstein. This pedigree prompted Steve Jobs himself to select and pursue Isaacson to be his official biographer. Jobs gave more than forty interviews to Isaacson and did not put conditions on the book (apart from the design of the cover). Isaacson interviewed more than 100 family, friends, colleagues and competitors to put together a complete picture of the man's life.

Steve Jobs is one of the most candid biographies I can remember reading of a contemporary figure. While he is never far from feeling awe at man's accomplishments, they are warts and all. Steve's short temper, strange diet, and immaturity are not avoided. Isaacson tries to arrive at the truth by observing the vision of the events of each part.

The book is organized in a largely chronological fashion, beginning with Job's adoption as a baby, following him through college where he dropped out to start Apple, to the Macintosh computer, and Job's firing by his own company. From there, it looks at Job's attempt to start another computer company and then his role at Pixar until his return to Apple. Once back at Apple, the chapters are divided by project, including Apple Stores, iTunes, iPod, iPhone, and iPad. The end of the book follows the progress of his illness, until about a month before his death. The final chapter is an attempt to bring it all together in the legacy of man.

As I read the book, I felt that I gained more knowledge not only about Steve Jobs, but also about Apple and its philosophy. I understood why Flash is not on the iPhone and why Apple never licensed its design to other vendors, as Microsoft and IBM did.

It is difficult to dispute the claim that Steve Jobs was the most important executive of the last 100 years. Not only did he build Apple, twice, but he also created Pixar, which has revolutionized animation and saved Disney. Jobs was also based on the philosophy that the consumer did not know what they wanted and it was their job to tell them. Jobs told them, and they listened. Apple changed the way we think about smartphones and turned the tablet from a dead gimmick to a must-have in every home. With iTunes, Apple changed the way we consume media. All of this was possible because Jobs approached business from the point of view of a creator and not a bean counter. I hope this book will become a required text in all business schools.

If the book has a flaw, it's that Steve Jobs's life had too much history to fit into 656 pages. There are parts where I would have liked more detail, but I think in most of those cases it was because I was starting to get interested in the stories of the people around Steve, and this book is Steve's story. I wanted a companion volume on Pixar, a companion volume on Microsoft, and a companion volume on Jony Ive, Apple's chief designer.

Appropriately, I bought the e-book and read it on my iPad.

It was in 1976, actually April Fool's Day, when the two Steves, Wozniak and Jobs, created a new computer circuit board in a Silicon Valley garage. In fact, I remember your first press release later that year. Like many others, I dismissed it as insignificant at the time. How would you ever have known? The consumer electronics press of that year was filled with the rise of Sony's Betamax and boombox: only a handful of people in the world dreamed that computers could become "personal."

Why do we love Steve Jobs so much?

Unlike the Woz, which is practically cute, which is the Good G in general.

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It was in 1976, actually April Fool's Day, when the two Steves, Wozniak and Jobs, created a new computer circuit board in a Silicon Valley garage. In fact, I remember your first press release later that year. Like many others, I dismissed it as insignificant at the time. How would you ever have known? The consumer electronics press of that year was filled with the rise of Sony's Betamax and boombox: only a handful of people in the world dreamed that computers could become "personal."

Why do we love Steve Jobs so much?

Unlike the Woz who is practically cute, who is the good guy in general, who is the engineer that we all admire ... the other Steve was ... well, thorny. I could bite your nose in disagreement. He rolled over his product managers without shame. He would verbally beat anyone who got in his way.
Frank Perdue, America's king of prepackaged chicken, used to say, "It takes a tough man to make a tender chicken."

Well, it took a tougher man to make a better Apple. We love Steve Jobs because he was tough, not the tough macho guy, but the tough guy that Winston Churchill verbalized: never, never, never give up.

To understand Steve, we need to understand that Steve grew up in the 60s ... and went to college (only briefly) in 1972. This was the period of time when if you were young and American in California, you probably had hair long. and against the Vietnam War, and against authority in general.

At public rallies, to the approval of the crowd, in those days Jerry Rubin could yell, "Never trust anyone over 30."

In this environment, Apple was founded to deliver computers to people rather than businesses and the military. Apple was founded as an anti-establishment and at the time the establishment was a large corporation / large government represented by IBM.

The original Macintosh was launched to a standing ovation for this reason ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2B-XwPjn9YY.

I bought my first Macintosh when it was released in the UK by Dixons in London. It was the first commercially successful personal computer to use a mouse and a graphical interface. You knew when you opened the original Macintosh (later renamed Macintosh 128) that MS-DOS would go down in history. It just blew you away, the way Steve's products still inspire customers today.

With brilliant visuals, the famous Macintosh commercial directed by Ridley Scott was played during SuperBowl in 1984 ... and resonated with Apple's mission: power to the people!

View this famous Macintosh commercial as an allegory of Steve throwing his hammer to break the zombie trance that big business had on their managers, preventing them from seeing what consumers really want.

A year later, in 1985, Microsoft would admit defeat with MS-DOS and launch the Windows operating system. It looked suspiciously like a copy of the Mac interface. When Mac fans yelled "Disgusting," PC fans simply claimed that Apple stole their concept from Xerox Parc anyway. It's one thing to take an idea from an expert lab and bring it to market, and it's another for a large company to copy it from a competitor. Much of the Mac fanbase's anger at Microsoft still goes back to this point. However, Microsoft won that battle and then the war.

(Microsoft released Windows 3.0 in May 1900, the first version to offer the standard "look and feel" of Windows for years to come. And that third iteration gave the first credit to the legend that Microsoft needs at least three versions to get any hit right. launching).

Microsoft's conversion to icons (Windows) on the desktop damaged the Mac niche.

In 1983, then-Apple president Mike Markkula wanted to retire. He believed (perhaps not incorrectly) that Steve Jobs (who wanted to be the president of the company) lacked the discipline, temperament, and experience to run Apple on a daily basis.

Steve Jobs then made his legendary speech to John Sculley, marketing guru and president of Pepsi: "Do you want to sell sugar water for the rest of your life? Or do you want to come with me and change the world?"

It looked like a dream team but it soured in no time. In 1985 Steve was publicly kicked out of the company he founded in a famous dispute with John Sculley, whom Jobs ironically hired to run Apple because Wall Street wanted "a businessman," not a Visionary. How wrong was Wall Street ...

At the time, Sculley was seen as Apple's savior. Actually. It was an international (and very public) embarrassment for Steve. With just a bit of public sentiment on his side, Steve Jobs was discarded, forgotten, and Sculley reigned until 1993. The world discarded Steve Jobs.

Meanwhile, Sculley drank in the spotlight. His role at Apple gave him a high-tech halo big enough that this soda executive even wrote a book based on his newfound status as a high-tech guru.

When Sculley left Apple, she was out of sight ... outside of the halo Apple had given her.

Apple went through more difficult times. In 1997, the company asked Jobs to come back as an "advisor." Steve had launched NeXT, bought Pixar ... neither was a huge success at the time. Steve took the opportunity to return to his dream, Apple. Perhaps Steve, baked in the crucible of such public failure, had grown up as a person and as a business manager. He was certainly older and more experienced.

But it wasn't easy ... Apple had lost its way. If it weren't for a merciful $ 150 million investment by Microsoft, maybe Apple wouldn't have made it. The headlines read "Microsoft rescues Apple ..." and Apple fans weren't happy with the deal. Page on youtube.com

It must have taken Steve Jobs quite a shot to get that money from Bill Gates. But along the way, part of being tough is doing what needs to be done.

In 2000, Jobs was again officially appointed CEO of Apple. In 2001, iTunes was launched, as well as the first iPod and the first Apple Store. In 2007, Apple released its first iPhone.

By 2011, Apple had sold 100 million iPhones worldwide. A company with no experience in mobile communications took on telephony giants like Nokia, Motorola and Blackberry to become the world's largest mobile phone provider by revenue.

In 2010, the fabulously successful iPad sold 15 million units, bringing to life the world of tablets that Bill Gates had envisioned in 2000 (but failed to achieve). It was Bill's turn to gulp.

After Steve Jobs left Apple in 1985, he went on to form NeXT Computer, a Unix workstation company. Few people know that the NeXT Cube workstation was used by Tim Berners-Lee of CERN to create the first version of the web. Apple bought NeXT in 1996 - the NeXTstep operating system became the famous Mac OS X.

Steve's 1986 investment in a computer animation company, Pixar, forever changed the way Hollywood made animated films. Finding Nemo (2003) and Toy Story 3 (2010) are among the 50 highest grossing films of all time. Disney, the giant of this genre, bought the company for its expertise by paying $ 7.4 billion, a transaction that made Steve Jobs the largest individual shareholder of Disney at the time.

Jobs had similar, but less publicized, success in disrupting the retail giants. When everyone dismissed his interest in starting his own outlets, Steve persisted in a way not unlike Bob Dylan, insisting on his electric guitar in front of a loudly disagreeing audience. Apple stores became an unrivaled retail phenomenon with 325 stores, each averaging $ 40 million per year in sales. Steve's retail concept had the highest sales per square foot in the world, showing that Big Business and Big Box retailers still have a lot to learn. Apple made it look easy, which is why many manufacturers (and retailers) have tried to copy its retail success; Nevertheless,

It was the best comeback in the history of technology ... perhaps the best comeback in the history of business.

We love Steve Jobs because he quickly grew in his personal talents, fell, got up, and got another chance. And he achieve it. We love Steve Jobs because he poked fun at big business while becoming one. We love Steve Jobs because he showed Big Business ... first the PC business, then the consumer electronics business, then the mobile phone business and the music industry. It even appeared in Disney and Hollywood.

If he lived longer, no large company would be safe from Steve's ability to disintegrate, to re-imagine the future that the headlines could not see ...

He showed us how big companies don't really know what their customers really want. For all his workgroups, product teams, committees (and other "bs" of big companies) ... Steve showed us a man, a person, a very determined individual who would not accept traditional corporate commitments, could create great products and it could change the world.

He never gave up. And despite the great odds of fighting big business, he made a perfect comeback.

However, this has never been about perfection. Steve wasn't perfect and Apple makes mistakes too.

We really love Steve Jobs because his best legacy is nothing built by Apple: it is his struggle to be an individual in a world that would have us all on invisible lines.

Steve's departure left the business world less of a hero ... but his legend is heroic and will endure.

  • Most of the quality biographies I read in one go. I've put Jobs's book down about 20 times, always upset with the author.
  • I have never read an authoritative biography with so much negative material, and I challenge anyone to come up with one.
  • The author knew that Jobs was dying and had thin skin, and he took advantage of Jobs's confidence to produce something closer in spirit to Kitty Kelley than serious scholarship.
  • There is more favorable material on John Sculley than on Jobs. In every disagreement between Sculley and Jobs, the author is on Sculley's side.
  • It doesn't matter if you use Myers-Brigg
Keep reading
  • Most of the quality biographies I read in one go. I've put Jobs's book down about 20 times, always upset with the author.
  • I have never read an authoritative biography with so much negative material, and I challenge anyone to come up with one.
  • The author knew that Jobs was dying and had thin skin, and he took advantage of Jobs's confidence to produce something closer in spirit to Kitty Kelley than serious scholarship.
  • There is more favorable material on John Sculley than on Jobs. In every disagreement between Sculley and Jobs, the author is on Sculley's side.
  • It doesn't matter if you use Myers-Briggs or Asperger to describe Jobs's personality, but as in the Einstein biography, this Isaacson persona explicitly denies that it was. Even more absurd, he denies that Bill Gates was an Asperger.
  • "From time to time, I find myself in the presence of purity, purity of spirit and love, and I always cry. It just reaches out and grabs me." Steve Jobs. Is the author going to accept this at face value? So the rest of the book would have to be wrong. So the author decides that the person in whom Jobs saw purity of soul was actually an unstable and troubled person, and that is what Jobs falsely thought he was in love with.
  • "My role model was J. Robert Oppenheimer", Steve Jobs on himself as a team leader. This is one of the few ideas about Jobs that has not been better expressed elsewhere.

Steve Jobs scored a 32 on the ACT at a time when a 24 now equals a 28. According to Mensa, a 29 1 at that time is still a qualifying score for membership, so we can assume he's in the neighborhood of the 98th percentile. To get a 32, I assume you'd be in the neighborhood of a 35 today, which is currently at the 99.6 percentile 2. The correlations between standardized tests and IQ were much higher than they are today. The * recently * old SAT had a correlation as high as .86 3. Going through a conservative r of .82 from the old ACT to IQ and a 99.5 percentile score, we find:

math (0.82) * (. 995i → 2.576 SD) / math

Keep reading

Footnotes

1 Qualifying test scores 2 How many people score 34, 35, 36 on the ACT? Score breakdown 3 https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/ps/Frey.pdf?origin=publication_detail (https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/ps/Frey.pdf?origin=publication_detail )

Steve Jobs obtuvo un 32 en el ACT en un momento en que un 24 ahora equivale a un 28. Según Mensa, un 29 1 en ese momento sigue siendo un puntaje de calificación para la membresía, por lo que podemos suponer que está en el vecindario del 98. percentil. Para obtener un 32, supongo que estaría en el vecindario de un 35 hoy, que está en el percentil 99,6 en la actualidad 2. Las correlaciones entre las pruebas estandarizadas y el coeficiente intelectual eran mucho más altas de lo que eran hoy. El SAT * recientemente * antiguo tenía una correlación tan alta como .86 3. Pasando por una r conservadora de .82 desde el antiguo ACT hasta el coeficiente intelectual y una puntuación del percentil 99.5, encontramos:

math(0.82)*(.995i → 2.576 SD) = 2.112 SD =/math

  • 132 WAIS/WISC
  • 151 Cattel
  • 134 Stanford-Binet

A little bit a pseudo-data, but that’s a good lower bound for his IQ.

Personally, I’d put him in the 140 - 150 WAIS range due to his financial success. There is a correlation between the two, but I think this gives you a good estimate already. Feel free to upvote and I’ll perform that calculation.

EDIT:

Due to the surprising number of upvotes, this is a breakdown of Steve Jobs’s IQ as predicted from financial success.

At beginning of the year of his death, Steve Jobs was worth $8.3 Billion4 “tying” him as the 110th richest person alive. The world population turned 7 billion at the end of the same year.5 With that kind of rarity we find:

math110/7,000,000,000 ≈ 0.99999998428i → 5.6535 SD/math

Yes, “wow”

We have two choices for r:

  1. A senior published meta-analysis6
  2. Two recent unpublished meta-analyses7 8

The first finds:

math(0.23)*(5.6535 SD) ≈ 1.3 SD/math

  • 121 WAIS/WISC
  • 132 Cattel
  • 120 Stanford-Binet

The second two (.49 & .48) find:

math(0.485)*(5.6535 SD) ≈ 2.74 SD/math

  • 141 WAIS/WISC
  • 166 Cattel
  • 144 Stanford-Binet

At these top tiers of net worth, the income is proportional to wealth. We have few kings hoarding their piles of treasure, sinking out of existence. Old Warren Buffett is as competitive as ever. Even the Arabian oil barons experience mildly-meritocratic intelligence selection: they continue to invest and expand into renewable technologies, etc. Obviously, the ratio isn’t solid; so take note of that.

Steve Jobs was undoubtedly genius. Pristine intelligence is necessary to achieve innovation and success on a world scale. But… I think to myself of all the times Steve dropped acid, all of his adventures in India, the luck of his birth in The Valley, his astute emotional clairvoyance, and his dedication to merit.

These are what made Steve Jobs, Steve Jobs.

EDIT: grammar

Footnotes

1 Qualifying test scores 2 How many people score 34, 35, 36 on the ACT? Score breakdown 3 https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/ps/Frey.pdf?origin=publication_detail (https://www.psychologicalscience.org/pdf/ps/Frey.pdf?origin=publication_detail ) 4 The World's Billionaires 2011 - Forbes.com 5 Seven Billion Day - Wikipedia 6 http://www.emilkirkegaard.dk/en/wp-content/uploads/Intelligence-and-socioeconomic -success-A- meta-analytic-review-of-longitudinal-research.pdf 7 The Incredible Correlation Between IQ and Income 8 IQ and Permanent Income: Assessing the "IQ Paradox intellectual"

There is a Steve Jobs Biography by Walter Isaacson (biographer of best selling biographies of Albert Einstein and Benjamin Franklin) coming out NOV 21, 2011. It is the only authorized bio of Jobs, Isaacson had over 40 sit down interviews with him, tons of info collected from all sorts of fresh sources. The book will include info about his Aug 2011 stepping down.

This will be the end all be all of Jobs Biographies.

Its called "Steve Jobs"

http://www.amazon.com/Steve-Jobs-Biography-Walter-Isaacson/dp/1451648537

It is not a book you download from internet, it is a book you buy and read again and again. You put it where you can see at least once a day, I would prefer near your bed or on your study table. You read randomly one or two pages, you will not feel more motivated.

I personally suggest you that you invest some money and buy that book.

You can try this:

Steve Jobs https://www.amazon.in/dp/034914043X/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_zbiGAbPA16SGA

That is the link to purchase the book from Amazon.com


By Walter Isaacson - Steve Jobs: A Biography (First Printing) (9/15/11): Walter Isaacson: 8601400189702: Amazon.com: Books


And you can also buy it from flipkart
Steve Jobs - Buy Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson Online at Best Prices in India - Flipkart.com


Apparently any book store on the planet will have this book

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