Where can I get a job if I am a new graphic designer?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Cerys Brooks



Where can I get a job if I am a new graphic designer?

I think every aspiring graphic designer has asked that question.

Surely, you must first ask yourself this penetrating question. "Do I have what it takes?" If you answer, absolutely without question, I suggest you are deluding yourself.

If you answer, "I hope so, but I have some doubts," it would suggest that you might be a viable candidate and that you can be taught.

Make sure your portfolio is professional and clean (since everything is tightly closed and accurate). Portfolios are not about quantity, but quality. Always remember, you will be judged by your worst piece.

Is your work online? How sp

Keep reading

I think every aspiring graphic designer has asked that question.

Surely, you must first ask yourself this penetrating question. "Do I have what it takes?" If you answer, absolutely without question, I suggest you are deluding yourself.

If you answer, "I hope so, but I have some doubts," it would suggest that you might be a viable candidate and that you can be taught.

Make sure your portfolio is professional and clean (since everything is tightly closed and accurate). Portfolios are not about quantity, but quality. Always remember, you will be judged by your worst piece.

Is your work online? How stylish does your resume look?

One thing I would do is run an "audit" of other newly minted graphic designers and see how their work and resume compare. How does your work compare?

Most companies are looking for someone to grow and mentor within their company. Are you a team player? Or are you the lone wolf, a discontent, a raging ego? How are your digital skills? Are you an expert in all trades, but a master in none? Can you really design, or are you someone who only copies and pastes clipart? Do you know the difference between a serif and a san serif typeface? Do you expect to be the best in 6 months or do you realize you have a long way to go?

There are a few ways to jump-start your job search. Go to a really good designer for a portfolio audit, don't be afraid to tell you your strengths and weaknesses. Fix the portfolio issues that have been reported.

Get a job coach to help you with your interview skills. Go to a reputable haberdashery and buy suitable clothing for the interview. Read the book Dress for Success. Understand that companies have their own set of rules and uniforms.

Join your local AIGA chapter and become an active member. Go to all meetings and the network.

There are several online job boards: AIGA, Communication Arts, Adweek, UCDA, etc. Make a list and review it every few days.

Can I tell you a story? As a young art director in a small advertising company, we were expanding and needed to hire an additional designer. A man in a nice suit came in and had his portfolio in a photo album. (Strike one). He was bald except for a few hairs that he combed and slumped into a chair while waiting for his interview. (Hit two). His job was to design wooden signs for the Forest Service. (Strike three, four and five). A good dose of realism is usually a good advantage when looking for work in any field.

Other candidates had body odor. One who had one of the worst portfolios I've ever seen claimed that she couldn't get a job because she was a woman (even though we ended up hiring a woman). Don't bring an agenda with you.

The two most important qualities of a graphic designer are being humble and being hungry. One of my former students received an enviable job offer as an entry-level position at a good advertising company. The pay was low, but it was support with the promise of bigger and better things. He was offended by the position and the offer and turned down the job. There is a word for it: professional suicide. He never got another chance and completely disappeared from the design scene. Good for him!

Graphic design is a moving target. Stay current and yet based on design principles. Do you know what the hanging score is? Do you understand that with secondary leadership it is? What is a quad? What is RGB / CMYK? What are spot colors? What is a parent sheet?

Please please please. Without clothes, deft speech, lots of gold teeth, and big smiles will make up for a hobbyist portfolio. Either you have the juice or you don't. Remember the 3 Ps: perfect your portfolio, be patient and persevere.

Your social networks, friends and family. Many places will not want to hire you if you are just out of school and have no business experience, so it is up to you to find work to gain experience.

Graphic design encompasses a wide variety of products and services, from the mundane to the extremely fun and creative. You can focus on a single aspect of graphic design or master a broader range of graphic design skills.

In my career as a graphic designer, I have worked on:

  • Book covers
  • Brochure covers
  • Brochure interiors
  • Movie posters
  • Campaign posters
  • Billboards
  • Bus boards
  • Album covers
  • DVD Covers
  • Video game covers
  • Juice Bottle Label Designs
  • Toothbrush packaging
  • Teeth whitening packaging
  • Food packaging
  • Wine labels
  • Website designs
  • Web ad layouts
  • Mobile app designs
  • Web application designs
  • Internet
Keep reading

Graphic design encompasses a wide variety of products and services, from the mundane to the extremely fun and creative. You can focus on a single aspect of graphic design or master a broader range of graphic design skills.

In my career as a graphic designer, I have worked on:

  • Book covers
  • Brochure covers
  • Brochure interiors
  • Movie posters
  • Campaign posters
  • Billboards
  • Bus boards
  • Album covers
  • DVD Covers
  • Video game covers
  • Juice Bottle Label Designs
  • Toothbrush packaging
  • Teeth whitening packaging
  • Food packaging
  • Wine labels
  • Website designs
  • Web ad layouts
  • Mobile app designs
  • Web application designs
  • Internet newsletters
  • Print newsletters
  • Journals
  • Logos
  • Movie, video and game titles and on-screen graphics
  • Corporate Identity Suites (business cards, letterheads, etc.)
  • Magazine Ads
  • Wedding invitations
  • Postcards
  • Gift cards

And a bunch of others that I can't remember right now.

In the course of doing all of this, I had to master myself at:

  • Photo composition
  • photo editing
  • Color correction
  • Design
  • Typography
  • Illustration

As a branch of graphic design, I also learned:

  • Marketing
  • Writing
  • Moving graphics
  • Video edition
  • Old school photo processing (darkroom)
  • Photography
  • Printing (offset and digital)
  • Binding (perfect, stitch, staple, coil, etc.)
  • Frustrate
  • Enhancement
  • Injection molding
  • Folding and gluing
  • Screen printing
  • HTML and CSS
  • AppleScript for automation

And probably many others that don't immediately come to mind.

The software that I use quite regularly includes:

  • InDesign
  • Illustrator
  • Photoshop
  • Mode
  • After the effects
  • Text Wrangler (for HTML / CSS)
  • Lightroom
  • SketchBookPro

And not so often

  • Corel painter
  • After the effects
  • zBrush
  • 3DS Max

I've probably forgotten a lot of things.

My point here is that the scope of graphic design is MASSIVE and until true artificial intelligence is created, graphic designers will always be in demand.

But it is a profession with a lot of competition.

The gap between amateur and good is much smaller than the gap between good and excellent.

The big guys are the ones who make money doing graphic design.

The good fight.

Fans quickly drop it or get good and go on the long road to greatness.

Good luck! At the end of the day, even if the road to success is long, graphic design is FUN work.

Another former graphic designer here, 67. A designer for my entire professional life. Almost all my professional life I have solved it by being a partner or owner of the design firm, labeling 146 national and international awards for my own work, and working with small and large clients. I still work, because I love what I do, and I have the network and the clients.

You are unlikely to get a job as a graphic designer. A graphic designer, per se, is the lowest rung in the industry right now, moving up through some kind of managerial role: art director, creative director, etc. Corporations are

Keep reading

Another former graphic designer here, 67. A designer for my entire professional life. Almost all my professional life I have solved it by being a partner or owner of the design firm, labeling 146 national and international awards for my own work, and working with small and large clients. I still work, because I love what I do, and I have the network and the clients.

You are unlikely to get a job as a graphic designer. A graphic designer, per se, is the lowest rung in the industry right now, moving up through some kind of managerial role: art director, creative director, etc. Corporations are similar, with very, very few internal designers (<5), but with a manager of them, or with a large internal agency, with the same structure as a design firm.

Designers, even entry-level ones, are supposed to have digital media talents, and often in droves, along with UI / UX concepts and expertise, and some with a lot of coding. All companies contribute much of their marketing / advertising budget to digital media, so it is assumed that when applying for design work for the different tactical venues, the designer knows how to modify the design for that demographic. and that medium.

So a job is unlikely, though not impossible. Therefore, you must establish yourself as a design company. Never use the term autonomous, because it degrades you and presents yourself doing this for the moment. Present yourself for your strengths and build a base. Nonprofits generally need competent help (including digital). Corporations with in-house services may need backup help for vacations and campaigns.

If you offer yourself as a business solution, you can do so no matter where the customer is located. The people and companies they run are more than comfortable using remote resources; you just have to have the ability to execute the job and the commitment properly. I have been engaging clients internationally for the past 16 years, and many of them I never met or traveled with on Skype.

There are options for you, they will take work, time and imagination, and they probably won't involve being employed by anyone other than you.

With all my heart I can include, good luck!

Becoming a good graphic designer depends on your creativity and pace of work, but there are a few tips and tricks that will keep you above the rest. From applying colors to your work to choosing the best design, understanding the fundamental principles will guide you to be successful in graphic design.

1. Try different colors

After creating your work through whatever application you are using, try exporting it to Photoshop and play around with different colors to see which one will be the best for your work. Try things on until you are satisfied with the correct color.

2. Never assume that everything is fine.

Your mu

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Becoming a good graphic designer depends on your creativity and pace of work, but there are a few tips and tricks that will keep you above the rest. From applying colors to your work to choosing the best design, understanding the fundamental principles will guide you to be successful in graphic design.

1. Try different colors

After creating your work through whatever application you are using, try exporting it to Photoshop and play around with different colors to see which one will be the best for your work. Try things on until you are satisfied with the correct color.

2. Never assume that everything is fine.

You must delete the word 'assume' from your vocabulary if you want to be a good designer. Before submitting your work, do some prepress to make sure everything is correct and up to date.

3. Justify your actions

Sometimes you may want to make a change outside of your customers' requirements. They may not be interested, so you need to be persuasive enough to sell your ideas and get the go-ahead.

4. Take regular breaks

Don't stay glued to your computer for long periods of time. Take regular breaks. Take a walk and get some fresh air to give your mind a break. Doing this keeps your mind and body fresh, and you will find that it increases your creativity.

5. Join forums

Most of the best creative designers work from home, but this shouldn't stop you from joining forums. They allow you to meet people from all over the world and share ideas that will take your work to the next level. Collaborating with others is helpful in becoming a good graphic designer. Some useful forums include Designate online, Graphic Design Forum, and Smashing Magazine Forum.

6. Make use of a sketchbook.

Never underestimate the power of the sketchbook. Whenever a great idea comes up, start by drawing it in a sketchbook. This allows you to capture the idea and develop it before carrying it out on your computer. Over time, you will find that this enhances your creativity.

7. Get your specs right

Make sure you have the correct specifications before you start designing. All the necessary tools for your project should be ready to go, so download all the necessary plugins and applications that you will need to complete your design work.

8. Take a refreshing shower

We are not saying you smell! It's just that taking a cold shower helps keep your brain active and productive. When you step into a cold shower, your heart rate speeds up, your breathing deepens, and your body tries to keep you warm. This process oxygenates the brain and the adrenaline that you experience from your increased heart rate gives you a boost of energy. Also, staying relaxed and comfortable can significantly improve your performance.

9. Draw a map

Highlight phrases and keywords and write them in your sketchbook. Then draw lines to join them and see how they add up. The purpose of this exercise is to put your creativity to work without thinking too much about it. Very soon, you will discover that you have come out with a beautiful design.

10. Read books

For you to be great in any endeavor, you must be a reader. There are thousands of books on graphic design aimed at expanding your knowledge. You can find these books both online and in bookstores, and they can contribute significantly to your knowledge. Just find the ones that are most relevant to you and then read them.

11. Maintain web standards

Being 100 percent compliant with web standards gives others the impression that you are serious about your business. All the tools and applications you need to comply with web standards must be up to date. And invest in other tools that you think will improve your work standards.

12. Stay up-to-date on the latest happenings.

Graphic design is a fast-moving profession that requires you to move with it. Stay informed on the latest developments taking place in the industry. Visit forums to see what people are saying and learn about the latest software that will improve your work.

13. Save your work at short intervals

There is nothing worse than losing your hard work simply because you forgot to save it. This type of error can leave you in a frustrating situation. You may not be able to recreate exactly what you lost, and you may miss an important deadline. Stress will affect your creative abilities, so save your work constantly to be safe.

14. Collaborate with colleagues

Nobody knows everything. Get together with other people in the same field as you and share ideas. You can expect to learn something new from every work-related conversation you have with your friends, and they will learn things from you.

15. Get it right

Before you send the job out to your clients, test it several times to make sure everything works fine. Your reputation suffers if you submit a project that doesn't work when they test it. Always check that your finished product works perfectly.

There are many people who will say stay away from crowdsourcing, and some have valid points ... but I started my journey when I was still learning graphic design and started with 99designs. (I've also worked on designcrowd crowd spring and design hill, but 99 is 'home') It's a great place to chat with other designers, get advice, keep up with the latest styles. And you can earn money along the way. Okay, you do a lot of "free" work. which means you are not going to win every contest, if you do then you shouldn't be working there you should go to a company hahaha ... but in the end you get a great portfolio

Keep reading

There are many people who will say stay away from crowdsourcing, and some have valid points ... but I started my journey when I was still learning graphic design and started with 99designs. (I've also worked on designcrowd crowd spring and design hill, but 99 is 'home') It's a great place to chat with other designers, get advice, keep up with the latest styles. And you can earn money along the way. Okay, you do a lot of "free" work. which means you are not going to win every contest, if you do then you shouldn't be working there, you have to go to a company hahaha ... but in the end you get a great portfolio and you will find clients along the way.

My experience with 99designs was like this.
I was a sitepoint member and made some 'logos' on the forums ... a couple of years later I was looking for a contest site like worth1000 and I found 99designs ... only when I went to register did I say that I was already a member! I didn't realize until a little later that it was created from sitepoint and I was transferred ...

Anyway I entered a competition and gave everything I had .. I won! my first contest my first win .. I was hooked. (I still work with this client today on many projects)
Over the years I have worked and honed my skills in various areas ... like many, I started with logos, then moved on to app icons, web design, book covers, etc. I've tried many categories over the years, but I really found my 'niche' in label and landing page design ... which brings me to where I am now.
99designs offers a unique platform for projects and 1-to-1 services for platinum designers. I have collected clients through their contests or simply that they see my work and I have contracts of 1 to 3 years with them. I hardly ever work on contests anymore because of contract jobs and 1-to-1 projects and services.

I think what I'm saying is that 99designs gave me the break I needed. I was talented, but being from a small town and not being able to move to a bigger one, I had to work as a freelancer ... and I couldn't pay to 'bid' on a job. so crowdsourcing worked really well for me. Now I run a successful business from home, where Clients find me. I still use 99designs for some clients and some new ones contact me all the time. If you use crowdsourcing as a tool, it will work fine. It takes a lot of work to get started, but it will be worth it in the end.

So long, short answer ... 99designs and then designcrowd ... the rest is rigged and / or the contest stays in limbo without ever paying ...
If you join 99designs, send me a message and I'll give you some tips and advice. I will give you a virtual tour.
Daylite Designs

It can be unstable and unprofitable, but it can be the opposite if you have the right skills, are willing to work hard, and are flexible enough to keep reinventing yourself as the industry changes. I've made a living as a designer for over 30 years, so I know it can be done.

Having said that, I must point out that the industry has changed dramatically over the years and is not in a good place at the moment for many professionals. With the advent of software design tools, the entry bar to the design field narrowed dramatically, resulting in a flood of inexperienced people.

Keep reading

It can be unstable and unprofitable, but it can be the opposite if you have the right skills, are willing to work hard, and are flexible enough to keep reinventing yourself as the industry changes. I've made a living as a designer for over 30 years, so I know it can be done.

Having said that, I must point out that the industry has changed dramatically over the years and is not in a good place at the moment for many professionals. With the advent of software design tools, the entry bar to the design field dropped dramatically, resulting in a flood of inexperienced designers, many without any training. The result was an overall decline in design quality and customer expectations. It also created an extremely competitive environment. Suddenly talented and experienced designers were competing for jobs primarily on price.

In today's market, there are two types of designers. Less talented, experienced, and business savvy designers are in a difficult position and still compete on price. But if a designer is experienced and understands the strategic importance of design to business, they are in a good position to become a valuable asset to business and receive compensation.

If you are just starting out, it will be difficult. But if you are good at it and you are persistent, you may be able to move from the lower level to the higher level and make a very good living. A designer today not only has to produce beautiful work, but must add a lot of business and design value in order to make his clients more successful.

Design fundamentals are the foundation of all visual media, from fine art to modern web design. They are even present in seemingly unimportant details, such as the fonts that make up most compositions.

What do these examples have in common? Some very basic elements, including line, shape, texture, and balance. They may not seem like much on their own, but together they are part of almost everything we see and create.

The basics can be intimidating at first, especially if you don't consider yourself an artist. But keep an open mind, there are many things they can teach you about work.

Keep reading

Design fundamentals are the foundation of all visual media, from fine art to modern web design. They are even present in seemingly unimportant details, such as the fonts that make up most compositions.

What do these examples have in common? Some very basic elements, including line, shape, texture, and balance. They may not seem like much on their own, but together they are part of almost everything we see and create.

The basics can be intimidating at first, especially if you don't consider yourself an artist. But keep an open mind - there are many things they can teach you about working with different assets and creating simple images from scratch.

Watch the video to learn more about the fundamentals of design.

Line

A line is a shape that connects two or more points. It can be fat, thin, wavy or irregular; the list goes on. Each possibility gives the line a slightly different feel.

Lines appear frequently in the design; for example, in drawings and illustrations. They are also common in graphic elements, such as textures, patterns, and backgrounds.

The lines can also be used in more humble compositions, as organization, emphasis or simply as decoration. In the following example, lines have been used to create a flow chart that guides the reader's gaze from one item to the next.

When working with lines, pay attention to things like weight, color, texture, and style. These subtle qualities can have a huge impact on the way your design is perceived.

Look for places where the lines are hidden in plain sight; for example, in text. Even here, experimenting with different line qualities can give very different results.

Shape

A shape is any two-dimensional area with a recognizable boundary. This includes circles, squares, triangles, etc.

The shapes are divided into two different categories: geometric (or regular) and organic (where the shapes are freer).

Shapes are a vital part of the visual communication of ideas. They give weight to the images and make them recognizable. We understand street signs, symbols, and even abstract art largely because of shapes.

Shapes have a surprising number of uses in everyday design. They can help you organize or separate content, create simple illustrations, or simply add interest to your work. See if you can find the many examples in the image below.

Shapes are important because they are the basis of many things. Learn to look for them in other designs and you will soon start to see them everywhere.

Form

When a shape becomes 3D, we call it a shape. Shapes make up a variety of things in the real world, including sculptures, architecture, and other three-dimensional objects.

However, the shapes do not have to be three-dimensional shapes. They can also be involved through illustration, using techniques such as light, shadow, and perspective to create the illusion of depth.

In two-dimensional design, shape makes realism possible. Without it, renderings like the image below, a ball with lights and shadows, just wouldn't be the same.

Even images that are less realistic use similar techniques to create dimension. Below, the lighting and shading are stylized, but still hint at shape and depth.

In everyday composition, the purpose of the form is the same, but on a smaller scale. For example, a simple shadow can create the illusion of layers or give an object a sense of place.

Basic shapes can bring a touch of realism to your work, which is a powerful tool when used sparingly.

Texture

Texture is the physical quality of a surface. Like the shape, it can be part of a three-dimensional object, as in the example below (a small prickly cactus in a shiny ceramic pot).

Or it may be implied through the illustration, suggesting that it would be textured if it existed in real life.

In design, texture adds depth and touch to otherwise flat images. Objects may appear smooth, rough, hard, or soft, depending on the elements in play.

For beginners, textures make great background images and can add a lot of interest to your work. Look closely and you may find textures in unexpected places, such as worn fonts and smooth, shiny icons.

Just be careful not to overdo it - too much texture in a single design can quickly become overwhelming.

Balance

Balance is the equal distribution of visual weight (more specifically, how much an item attracts the viewer's attention). Balance can be affected by many things, including color, size, number, and negative space.

Mastering balance can be tricky for beginners because it requires some intuition. Fortunately, the world of design is full of examples that can help you understand its different iterations.

Symmetrical designs are the same or similar on both sides of an axis. They feel balanced because each side is effectively the same (if not identical).

Asymmetrical designs are different, but the weight is still evenly distributed. The composition is balanced because it calls attention to the right things (in this example, the person's name and company logo).

The rule of thirds

Many people, including designers and photographers, use a strategy called the rule of thirds. This imagines your work area divided into a 3x3 grid. The focal point of the image is placed on or near one of the grid lines, creating visual balance with the rest of the space.

We find this type of composition appealing because, according to studies, the human eye naturally follows this path when scanning a design.

Putting it all together

The fundamentals of design are all about the bigger picture—in other words, learning to appreciate the many small details that make up every composition.

This insight can be applied to almost any type of project, whether you're creating your own graphics or just looking for simple ways to enhance your work.

We hope you enjoyed learning the fundamentals of design!

You indeed don't need to attend a course to make good design. You need to develop a problem solving mindset.
This can happen by yourself or through a course, depending on your own character.

I realised anyway, while attending my design school, that I thought I knew perfectly many things that in reality, I didn't. Not as well as I thought.

The first thing you have to learn is that in design there is a lot of psychology and hidden rules (which many think are just 'I think it's good design', but in reality, things are much more complex).

If you want to study many books by yourself

Keep reading

In fact, it is not necessary to attend a course to do a good design. You need to develop a problem solving mindset.
This can happen by yourself or through a course, depending on your own character.

Anyway, while attending my design school, I realized that I thought I knew perfectly many things that I did not really know. Not as good as I thought.

The first thing you have to learn is that in design there is a lot of psychology and hidden rules (which many think are just 'I think it's good design', but in reality, things are much more complex).

If you are willing to study lots of books yourself and find clients, you can have a stellar career with or without a degree.

En una nota al margen, un curso te obliga a notar muchas cosas:

1) You'll be often asked to work with others. That is fundamental to taste the feeling you'll get in an agency environment. Again, if you plan on working alone, this is not fundamental. But it does help to lower your ego and notice that your opinions have to be changed to match those of others. This is similar to the kind of humility you have to show with clients. They can suggest things, and you have to choose how to fulfill their requests without cheapening your work. You have to be honest: if an idea is unusable, tell them. If not, try to implement it as good as you can, to maximise its potential.

Of course you can force yourself to work with others, without anybody forcing you. But in that case, you choose them. In a course you often don't, like in an agency.

2) You think you know Photoshop and illustrator, right? It might not be your case, but I bet that the 80% of people who say that they do, actually know them very superficially. It depends on what was your approach- if it was the same as those of most self taught designers, you learnt them 'trying out' the functions, seeing what they do. Many parts of these beautiful softwares stay unnoticed.

3) Teachers can be very tough clients. They won't buy some of the stuff certain 'designers' sell to convince their clients. They want something really valuable, meaningful. Something that works.

Now, you can have a fantastic design career without it, but I wouldn't even trash the possibility to attend a course. Aren't all the tutorials we follow online mini-courses as well? It's up to you whether you need an official one or not.

The only fundamental thing you have to do is to start looking at the world as a designer.

Notice that design is everywhere. Sometimes, it is life saving. Your work isn't cheap- you might have some cheap work to do, most of the time. But the way you do it can really change people's perception on things. Products include beautiful things like CDs, books, vinyls, illustrations; or they can be important like the design on a medicine box. How does it make the sick person feel?

Start learning how to convey certain emotions through colors, shapes, fonts.

That's the fundament step that you must
take, whichever of these two roads you choose.

  1. Make sure your work is great.
  2. Build strong industry connections with people who can hire you. Connect with as many professionals in your field as possible in the places where you would like to work. Make friends with them as much as possible, ask them for advice and what it takes to work in their establishment, don't ask for work… ask them for advice.
  3. Get in touch and familiarize yourself with artist representation agencies. Let them find work for you.
  4. Be prepared to leverage your own work directly from companies that need graphic design work. Look at the designs for the local business. Look at the designs
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  1. Make sure your work is excellent.
  2. Build strong industry connections with people who can hire you. Connect with as many professionals in your field as possible in the places where you would like to work. Make friends with them as much as possible, ask them for advice and what it takes to work in their establishment, don't ask for work… ask them for advice.
  3. Get in touch and familiarize yourself with artist representation agencies. Let them find work for you.
  4. Be prepared to harness your own work directly from businesses that need graphic design work. Look at the designs for the local business. Notice the designs that can be improved. Do a mock up of a better design. Make a meeting with the prospect to present your new designs. This is your spec work. Be careful with this approach. Work with trustworthy people.
  5. Contact printers, and ask them for design work. let them know you wan to start bringing your clients to them as you grow.
  6. Contact web developers (backend) let them know you can partner with them and help them round out the services by providing high quality graphic design for their clients.

Hi,

It's easy to get a job you just need to know how.

1. Make a good portfolio on Behance or Shots - Dribbble - Dribbble (if you have a good portfolio, people will look for you, you don't have to go looking for work. Post amazing things).

2. Look for design agencies or creative studios around you or in your city.

3. Send them a message with your emails, including a link to your portfolio, and tell them why you want to work for them. (Agencies and studios are always looking for creative people) if they like your work, you will get a call from them.

4. The other way is to apply for jobs through job portals.

Keep reading

Hello there,

It's easy to get a job that you just need to know how to do.

1. Make a good portfolio on Behance or Shots - Dribbble - Dribbble (if you have a good portfolio, people will look for you, you don't have to go looking for work. Post amazing things).

2. Look for design agencies or creative studios around you or in your city.

3. Send them a message with your emails, including a link to your portfolio, and tell them why you want to work for them. (Agencies and studios are always looking for creative people) if they like your work, you will get a call from them.

4. La otra forma es solicitar puestos de trabajo a través de portales de empleo como naukari.com, Monster Jobs - Búsqueda de empleo, Asesoramiento profesional y recursos de contratación, Búsqueda de empleo | En efecto.

Acuérdate de mí cuando consigas un trabajo, me debes una cerveza. Salud. La mejor de las suertes.

There are a few places where you can find a quality graphic designer.

One of the best is Dribbble (and take a closer look at Outcrowd design agency), Behance and UpWork.

Of course, always ask for new works in portfolio:)

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