When Steve Jobs passed away, his last words were "Oh WOW, Oh WOW, Oh WOW!" What are some of the last memorable words you may have heard?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Dylan Berry



When Steve Jobs passed away, his last words were "Oh WOW, Oh WOW, Oh WOW!" What are some of the last memorable words you may have heard?

"God created evil" were the last words I spoke out loud during a furious discussion with some random Christian who had started preaching to me and wouldn't shut up. When I said those words, that guy, with a sudden wide-eyed look of terror, jumped to his feet, ran into a storm where the winds were almost 100 mph and the temperature was 30 below zero and disappeared at night, after I closed the door thinking 'Have a good trip!' and I was happy to settle into the little cabin, feeling relatively safe, on a one-square-mile island off the coast of Alaska, thinking that I would just wait for the storm to pass. However, I was surprised that I was not the only one on the island, but now I felt so much better and felt like I had never felt so good.

I looked down, there lay a body, something crumpled at my feet, I thought that was strange and jumped back, and the reality that that thing was me slowly sank, like a horror movie, you could almost hear the ' doo doo doo doo 'as something terrible dawns and the little bell in the back of my head sounds crazy.

Then this great voice says “You have blasphemed against my Holy Spirit - a sin that is unforgivable, however, if you repent, this sin will be forgiven you because you said it in ignorance, and if not, your name will be erased from the Book. of Life and written in the Book of the Dead and your judgment will be on your own head… says the Lord your God ”.

I regret.

The full testimony of my death experience is here:

They lived, died and judged Noe Ramirez, Shiva Kumar Racherla, Mac Tatum and 15 others are collaborators

I was very hesitant before broaching this topic, but now that someone asked me, I will. To avoid any risk of bias, let me start by saying that all the details about Jobs' specific case are based on secondary sources, albeit from reliable sources in the media. I write this in a personal title, I do not pretend to know anything about the case on a personal level and I never participated in the care of Mr. Jobs. I base all my cancer figures on biomedical research sources that I know of.

I respect privacy and in no way wish to offend anyone mourning your passing. I have th

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I was very hesitant before broaching this topic, but now that someone asked me, I will. To avoid any risk of bias, let me start by saying that all the details about Jobs' specific case are based on secondary sources, albeit from reliable sources in the media. I write this in a personal title, I do not pretend to know anything about the case on a personal level and I never participated in the care of Mr. Jobs. I base all my cancer figures on biomedical research sources that I know of.

I respect privacy and in no way wish to offend anyone mourning your passing. I have the deepest respect for Mr. Jobs and his legacy, but I believe that in the spirit of his progressive worldview, learning from his case is an appropriate way to look back at the facts surrounding his life and legacy.

I have done 1.5 years of research on the type of tumor that affected Steve Jobs as a medical student in Amsterdam and I have some strong opinions about his case, not only as an admirer of his work, but also as a cancer researcher who has the impression that the course of his illness has been far from optimal.

Let me cut to the chase: Mr. Jobs reportedly chose to undergo all kinds of alternative treatment options before opting for conventional medicine.

This was, of course, a freedom he had every right to take, but under the circumstances, it seems logical to assume that Jobs' choice for alternative medicine could have led to an unnecessarily premature death.

Again, please understand that I am not aware of the specific case, I am only trying to provide information about your chances of a cure a priori. These are independent of your case and mere indicators that somehow your case got worse when statistically unlikely. What caused this to happen will be left to speculation. We are here to see if your therapeutic choices are possibly what made this happen.

First, let me clarify a few things about your illness:

Neuroendocrine tumors are much less deadly than "ordinary" pancreatic cancer.

The great confusion in the media is that Jobs had pancreatic cancer. Although your tumor could have originated in your pancreas, we are not talking about the dreaded pancreatic adenocarcinoma which has such a dire prognosis and accounts for 95% of pancreatic tumors.

Jobs is quoted as having said himself that he had an islet cell tumor, which is a less exact name used colloquially for the other 5% of pancreatic tumors, the so-called neuroendocrine tumors.

Neuroendocrine tumors are relatively mild forms of cancer.

Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) are a variety of tumors that mostly maintain their original function, producing endocrine hormones.
The downside to that is the chaos they cause in the body due to all kinds of hormonal imbalances caused by the hormones they produce. On the other hand, the level of differentiation is a strong indicator of how aggressive a tumor is: the better a tumor differentiates, for example, it maintains the characteristics of its originator, it is less invasive and prone to metastasis.

Just to illustrate how mild these tumors can be:

  • Up to 10% of autopsy people in the general population have been reported to have one of these symptoms without ever having had any symptoms in their lifetime.
  • Up to 30% of the GEP-NETs detected are so well differentiated that they are strictly not cancers. I have even come across an article in which insulinomas, the most common type of PEG-NET, were benign in 90% of cases.
  • If treated properly and on time, most people will not die from the cancer itself. In my series of patients, for many subtypes, the survival rate was as high as 100% for a decade.


Neuroendocrine tumors found early can be treated simply by surgically removing the tumor.

This is a relatively low-risk treatment that, especially compared to chemotherapy and radiation, has negligible disadvantages. In many cases, a simple enucleation (simply cutting the tumor with a safe margin around it) is sufficient and leaves no residual side effects.

Now, about this specific case:

Jobs had many favorable factors indicating that early surgical treatment could have been curative.

  • Jobs himself said they caught the tumor early. Early PEG-NETs means in many cases that surgical removal of the primary tumor without further removal of organs is curative with little chance of recurrence.
  • The tumor was located in a relatively forgiving site, the pancreas.
  • The tumor was presumably an insulinoma, one of the best treatable subtypes of GEP-NET.
  • The tumor was probably well differentiated. Mr. Jobs spoke of a hormonal imbalance, this points to a tumor that maintains its endocrine function, which is a general indicator of good differentiation. Well-differentiated tumors are less likely to metastasize and grow rapidly.


Please see the table below for a complete illustration of the numbers I am referring to. I chose an article from The Annals of Oncology as the source, as it is one of the few articles freely accessible to anyone interested in reading the full article: http: // annonc.oxfordjournals.org/content/21/9/ 1794


... but not treating the most innocent cancer can make it seriously worse.

I am currently reviewing hundreds of colon cancer cases, and about 25% of them start with a patient who comes with a history of polyps. Polyps are small benign growths on the lining of the intestine. They are absolutely harmless at first, but slowly but surely over the years they lose more and more of the "differentiation" mentioned above and some eventually turn into malignant colon cancer.

In fact, all colon cancers are supposed to start out as a polyp.

This 25% had their polyps removed, but they were unlucky that, between two colonoscopies, some other polyp found the time to turn into a real cancer. This is also why detection and timeliness are so important.

This also illustrates why growing even the most innocent malignancy is silly - a time bomb.

Jobs was a hippie in the past and now a skeptic of conventional medicine. His reaction to the disease gave the disease time to spread.

Many media outlets, including CNN, stated that Jobs could have gone up to two years without proper (conventional) treatment.

While Mr. Jobs was trying all kinds of alternative verbiage, I won't even bother to move on, as his failure is now sadly irrefutably proven, his tumor grew and grew and grew ...

... and then somehow it became beyond all control.

  • Jobs waited so long before seeking normal treatment that he had to undergo a Whipple procedure and lost his entire pancreas and duodenum in 2004. This was the first alarming sign that his disease had progressed beyond a compact primary to at least a tumor as big as the pancreas. and the duodenum could not be saved.
  • Jobs apparently waited long enough until it was revealed that the disease had spread widely to his liver. The only reason you would have a transplant after GEP-NET would be that the tumor has invaded all major parts of the liver, which takes a considerable amount of time. Years, in most neuroendocrine tumors. It could be that this happened before your diagnosis, but the risk grows exponentially over time.
  • Then we saw that the tumor was slowly taking his life. It was horrible watching him lose weight and slowly turn into a skin and bone form of himself.


However, it appears that even during this recurring phase, Jobs chose to devote his time to Apple as the disease progressed, rather than opting for chemotherapy or any other conventional treatment.

As for the "why?" question:

Each patient has a different view of their disease and treatment priorities, or how much suffering and risk they are willing to endure as compensation for a greater chance of being cured.

For most people, confidence in their doctor's intention to treat them is almost complete. We encourage patients to educate themselves on the subject and encourage personal choices, but the extent to which people can navigate all the technicalities and the vast amount of medical evidence is limited not only by the level of understanding of this specialized knowledge, but also simply for the sheer time it takes to inform yourself about this.

Jobs was always a free thinker, a strong believer in spirituality, a vegetarian, and a known skeptic of conventional medicine. He chose to reject conventional medicine altogether for a time. You are not alone in that. We meet many such people and we all know someone among us who uses homeopathy or has this known fear of anything "chemical" (to which I always tell them that everything is chemical, if you think that dihydrogen oxide sounds scary, they should stop drinking water). Individual freedom of thought and choice is a cornerstone of our modern society, and the medical world is no exception.

It is always an ethical conundrum if a patient chooses an alternative treatment that we know will in fact not work. However, as long as the person is mentally sane, we cannot force them to choose a treatment that works, even if it means death. Sadly, even for one of the greatest personalities of the last 100 years, there will be no exception, and poorly treated cancer is as deadly to him as it is to anyone else ...

Actually, this is not the last photo of him. There is a photo that shows him coming home from the hospital, a couple of days later he dies. I will post it below.

There can be many reasons why Steve Jobs couldn't stop the photo. First of all, it is incredibly difficult to delete something from the internet. Once an image is online, anyone can copy it. So every time you delete a photo from a web page, wait for someone else to repost it on another page. Although everyone knew of his poor health conditions, it was not a surprise to see him so thin and fragile.

This photo was published in August 2011.

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Actually, this is not the last photo of him. There is a photo that shows him coming home from the hospital, a couple of days later he dies. I will post it below.

There can be many reasons why Steve Jobs couldn't stop the photo. First of all, it is incredibly difficult to delete something from the internet. Once an image is online, anyone can copy it. So every time you delete a photo from a web page, wait for someone else to repost it on another page. Although everyone knew of his poor health conditions, it was not a surprise to see him so thin and fragile.

This photo was published in August 2011, after he resigned as CEO of Apple. So his last appearance as CEO was at WWDC2011, where he already looked terribly ill.

After that keynote everyone knew about, he won't be there for much longer.

The resignation of being CEO has already freed the burden of being very careful with his health, since Apple's actions were closely related to the health of Steve Jobs. Any rumors caused the stock price to move, as you may recall.

Steve Jobs at the time knew that his days were undoubtedly over. That is why he gathered all his energy to ensure a perfect future for Apple. Would you spend your last days with disturbing people who post things about you? Remember, shortly after his death his biography was published in which he talks openly about his entire health problem, so why keep it a secret?

Here is the last appearance before his death. It seems more dead than alive. This was taken on September 27, 2011. So a week before he passed away.

Steve Jobs DID have a transplant. There are countless stories that claim that he did not bother to treat his condition or that he refused to receive a transplant. ALL are false. NONE is true. Could I have made a quicker effort? Maybe. But he received the transplant and much more.

In 2004, he underwent pancreas surgery and five years later, in 2009, he received a pancreas transplant. She really wanted to live and did everything she could to find a donor organ and get the operation that prolonged her life but in the end, tragically, did not save her.

Don't take my word for it. Listen to it and watch it from the

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Steve Jobs DID have a transplant. There are countless stories that claim that he did not bother to treat his condition or that he refused to receive a transplant. ALL are false. NONE is true. Could I have made a quicker effort? Maybe. But he received the transplant and much more.

In 2004, he underwent pancreas surgery and five years later, in 2009, he received a pancreas transplant. She really wanted to live and did everything she could to find a donor organ and get the operation that prolonged her life but in the end, tragically, did not save her.

Don't take my word for it. Hear it and see it from the man himself ...

Here's Steve Jobs in a 2005 commencement speech he gave at Stanford, marking the precise point of his first public disclosure of his history with pancreatic cancer. Here he reveals his first scare with the condition in 2004 and his surgery:

Below is a speech he gave at Apple five years later, in late 2009. This was only after his hiatus at Apple, which he specifically took in order to receive his transplant and take time to recover:

Finally, a “60 Minutes” interview on CBS with his official biographer, Walter Isaacson, following the death of Steve Jobs. In it, Isaacson reveals that, in addition to the pancreas transplant, during his hiatus from Apple, Jobs also received a secret liver transplant for which he took a special trip to Memphis, Tennessee:

Anyone who says that Steve Jobs did not need surgery or refused to seek medical help is simply wrong. I have provided you here with direct evidence of the facts presented by Steve Jobs himself and the person he entrusted to tell his life story.

The man wanted to live and did his best to stay alive, but he had a terrible disease that is difficult to overcome and he fought it for years until it ran its course. In her last days, she had made her peace with him.

If you'd like, I recommend that you watch the entire Stanford commencement address, not just the segment I mentioned in this post. It is actually a great tribute to his way of seeing the world and how his face to face with death in 2004 changed his entire perspective and how he lived the rest of his days.

Having met him multiple times, including numerous one-on-one conversations, I can safely tell you that all the hype about how extraordinary he actually was doesn't even begin to adequately describe him. Everything is lost in a hyperbole and a cliche that will never be enough to capture how unique, special and complex he was, not only as an innovator of industrial design or a popularizer of technology, but also as an artist with something to say and a truly exceptional human being. be.

To paraphrase Jobs' introduction to the iPhone in 2007, every now and then an answer comes in that changes everything.

Until the moment I started writing this answer, I understood, having read various reports over the last 5 years or so since his death, that Jobs felt the end was near when he resigned and passed the baton on to his trusted delegate. Tim Cook.

The reasons are, the choice of words in your resignation letter:

I have always said that if a day came when I could no longer fulfill my duties and expectations as CEO of Apple, I would be the first to let you know. Unlucky

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To paraphrase Jobs' introduction to the iPhone in 2007, every now and then an answer comes in that changes everything.

Until the moment I started writing this answer, I understood, having read various reports over the last 5 years or so since his death, that Jobs felt the end was near when he resigned and passed the baton on to his trusted delegate. Tim Cook.

The reasons are, the choice of words in your resignation letter:

I have always said that if a day came when I could no longer fulfill my duties and expectations as CEO of Apple, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come.

The statement has an unmistakable tinge of sadness, apparently, for a man resigned to fate, forced to surrender to the imminent and inevitable. This for a man revered for this street fighting spirit, who surprised his family, in a not so pleasant way, by diving right back into work, after recovering from illness, for the first time.

Apart from that, the moment of resignation and his death also indicate the same. The resignation was submitted on August 24, 2011, while Jobs died on October 5.

But here are the experts from a Business Insider article that denies all of these and presents an entirely different perspective:

When Apple CEO Steve Jobs told COO Tim Cook in the summer of 2011 that he wanted Cook to become CEO, both men still believed that Jobs was getting better and that he would live long as former CEO of Apple.

In an interview with Bloomberg BusinessWeek editor Josh Tyrangiel, Cook says that "the conversation happened at a time when I felt Steve was getting better, and I think he felt that way too."

That is news.

Previously, the common assumption about the change at Apple's cusp was that Jobs only stepped down as CEO in August 2011 because he believed he was going to die soon.

Jobs, in fact, died shortly after: on October 5, 2011.

But Cook says the two actually planned "a very, very long period in which he was the president and I would be the CEO."

Cook even says that Jobs told him: "I hope you listen to my opinion if I want to comment on something."

It is well known that Jobs told Cook: “I don't want you ever to ask me what I would have done. Just do the right thing. "

But until now, we never knew that Jobs meant "don't ask me what I would have done," because Jobs believed he would still be around.

Two reactions.

  • How sad.
  • How strange to think that Jobs, even if he was still alive, wouldn't be running Apple right now.

A suitable third reaction would be Jobs's last words, "Oh wow, oh wow, oh wow."

Health.!!

My answer may seem a little different from the rest. Wait for the last words of famous personalities ranked from different moods, lined up without any sort order.

Knowing that you are going to die must be a horrible experience and while some remain unfortunate and disturbing, you will be surprised to find that few of these famous personalities knew of their death or had similar thoughts just before leaving the world.

  • "We'll be back in five minutes" - Paul Walker.
  • John Lenon's last words were: "They shot me."
  • At fifty, everyone has the face they deserve. - George Orwell
  • Nostradamus predicted: "Tomorrow, at dawn,
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My answer may seem a little different from the rest. Wait for the last words of famous personalities ranked from different moods, lined up without any sort order.

Knowing that you are going to die must be a horrible experience and while some remain unfortunate and disturbing, you will be surprised to find that few of these famous personalities knew of their death or had similar thoughts just before leaving the world.

  • "We'll be back in five minutes" - Paul Walker.
  • John Lenon's last words were: "They shot me."
  • At fifty, everyone has the face they deserve. - George Orwell
  • Nostradamus predicted: "Tomorrow, at dawn, I will no longer be here." He was correct.
  • Leonardo da Vinci was also too modest and said: "I have offended God and humanity because my work did not reach the quality that it should have". I guess the Mona Lisa is not good enough.
  • "The last words are for the fools who haven't said enough." - Karl Marx
  • Drummer Buddy Rich died after surgery in 1987. As he was being prepared for surgery, a nurse asked him, "Is there anything you can't take?" Rich replied, "Yes, country music."
  • Thomas Fantet de Lagny was a mathematician. On his deathbed, he was asked, "What is the square of 12?" His last words: "One hundred and forty-four."
  • R&B singer Johnny Ace died in 1954 while playing with a gun during a break on his concert set. His last words were: "I will show you that he will not shoot."
  • “Friends applaud. Comedy is over. "- Beethoven
  • Surgeon Joseph Henry Green was checking his pulse as he lay dying. His last word: "Stopped."
  • The famous writer James Baldwin said, "I am bored" before leaving the world.
  • As Benjamin Franklin was dying at the age of 84, his daughter told him to change position in bed so that he could breathe more easily. Franklin's last words were: "A dying man cannot do anything easy."
  • Rapper Tupac Shakur was pretty blunt on his deathbed when he uttered his last words: "Fuck you."
  • After accidentally stepping on his executioner's foot when Marie Antoinette, Queen of France, was climbing the scaffold towards the guillotine, he allegedly said, "Excuse me. I didn't do it on purpose."
  • Scottish novelist and playwright Sir James Matthew Barrie, also known as JM Barrie, uttered "I Can't Sleep" while lying on his deathbed on the top floor of Adephi Terrace House in London, England.
  • OO McIntyre was an American reporter. He died at age 53 and said his last words to his wife Maybelle: “Snooks, please turn around here. I like to look at your face. "
  • Founder of Jack Daniel's whiskey, Jack Daniel's last words were: "One last drink, please."
  • Thomas Edison, an avid inventor and businessman just before his death, came out of a coma, opened his eyes, and reportedly told his wife, "It's so beautiful out there."
  • James Brown said, "I'm going tonight."
  • Soccer coach Vince Lombardi died of cancer in 1970. As he died, Lombardi turned to his wife Marie and said, “Happy anniversary. I love you."
  • According to Steve Jobs' sister Mona, the Apple founder's last words were: "Oh wow. Oh wow. Oh wow."
  • "I'm going to the bathroom to read," famous singer Elvis Presley said.
  • Nancy Astor was the first woman to serve in the House of Lords of the British Parliament, her last words were: "Is it my birthday or am I dying?"
  • "Good evening dear ones, see you tomorrow" After saying good night to his longtime partner and friends on the night of March 22, 1973, Noel Coward, the playwright died of heart failure at his Firefly property in Jamaica. .
  • The last words of avid Bollywood superstar Rajesh Khanna were: "Hogaya hai time, pack up!" (translates to "Time's up, pack up!")
  • Killer James W. Rodgers was put in charge of a firing squad in Utah and asked if he had a last request. He replied, "Bring me a bulletproof vest."
  • "Absurd Absurdity" - Eleanor Rossevelet, politician and activist.
  • The last words of the fashion designer Coco Chanel were: "You see, this is how you die."
  • Basketball's great "Pistol" Pete Maravich collapsed during a pickup game. His last words: "I feel great."
  • Blues guitarist Leadbelly said, "Doctor, if I leave this guitar here now, I'll never wake up." And he was right.

and my favorite ever ..

  • Even at the time of his death, the legendary French grammarian Dominique Bouhours never failed to demonstrate his penchant for fluent grammar. On May 27, 1902, the neoclassical grammarian and essayist and critic pronounced his last words on his deathbed in Paris: "I am about to die, or I am going to die: either expression is correct." in front of loved ones, demonstrating proficiency in grammar construction, syntax, and clarity even in the face of near-death frailty. Even in his death, Bouhours never stopped showing his wit.

Some reference phrases from the following posts, the rest have been collected by researching on Google and some from the YouTube videos.

Thank you for reading!

Last words | Open Resources - Image n. 1

Google Images: Image No. 2, n. 3

The Independent UK

Mental thread

List25 - Consistently reconciling curiosity

One of the last times the late Steve Jobs made a public appearance in front of a camera, he was trying to sell Apple's vision of a massive, spaceship-style corporate campus to local officials.

Inspiration for us, he was a legendary in the tech industry.

His June 7, 2011 presentation for the Cupertino, California project (now a work in progress) is among the last recorded images of Jobs before he died of pancreatic cancer the following October. In the video, Jobs describes the building's futuristic design, which includes curved glass and sustainable power sources, a physical incarnation of Apple.

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One of the last times the late Steve Jobs made a public appearance in front of a camera, he was trying to sell Apple's vision of a massive, spaceship-style corporate campus to local officials.

Inspiration for us, he was a legendary in the tech industry.

His June 7, 2011 presentation for the Cupertino, California project (now a work in progress) is among the last recorded images of Jobs before he died of pancreatic cancer the following October. In the video, Jobs describes the building's futuristic design, which includes curved glass and sustainable power sources, a physical embodiment of Apple's (and Jobs's) progressive mindset.

His last photo:

What was the most recent photo of Steve Jobs before his death?

His last words:

"His tone was loving, loving, caring, but as someone whose luggage was already tied to the vehicle, who was already at the beginning of his journey, even when he was sorry, he was really very sorry to leave us," he writes. .

When he arrived, he found Jobs surrounded by his family - "he looked into his children's eyes as if he couldn't open his gaze" - and managed to stay conscious, he said.

However, it began to deteriorate. His breathing changed. She became stern, deliberate, determined. She could feel him counting his steps again, pushing further than before. Here's what I learned: he was working on this too. Death didn't happen to Steve, he did. "

May God give him peace ... I admire him ...

Was this the most recent photo of Steve Jobs before his death?

Steve Jobs was the most innovative person in the history of tech entrepreneurs.

When Jobs's sister, Mona Simpson, delivered a eulogy for her brother, she said Steve Jobs's last words “were monosyllables, repeated three times. Simpson explained: “Before embarking, he had looked at his sister Patty, then for a long time at his children, then at his life partner, Laurene, and then over his shoulders. Steve's last words were: OH WOW. OH WOW. OH WOW. "

While the alleged last words of Steve Jobs warning others against the pursuit of wealth and success turned out to be false, Jobs did not.

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Steve Jobs was the most innovative person in the history of tech entrepreneurs.

When Jobs's sister, Mona Simpson, delivered a eulogy for her brother, she said Steve Jobs's last words “were monosyllables, repeated three times. Simpson explained: “Before embarking, he had looked at his sister Patty, then for a long time at his children, then at his life partner, Laurene, and then over his shoulders. Steve's last words were: OH WOW. OH WOW. OH WOW. "

While Steve Jobs's alleged last words warning others against the pursuit of wealth and success turned out to be false, Jobs did not live his life without regrets. As Snopes points out, Jobs told biographer Walter Isaacson that he regretted the decisions he made about how to raise his children.

Isaacson recalled Jobs saying, “I wanted my kids to get to know me. I wasn't always there for them, and I wanted them to know why and understand what I did. "But, like many parents, Jobs was happy to have children. Isaacson's assessment was that" Steve made decisions. I asked him if he was happy with having kids and he said, 'It's 10,000 times better than anything I've ever done.'

Source: When did Steve Jobs die? And what were his last words?

It is difficult to answer this question within the context of Steve Jobs' own mind, however, it is much easier to answer it within the context in which the quote is found. It is quoted at the end of a eulogy by her biological sister Mona Simpson, an accomplished author.

Logically, we have to assume that if Steve Jobs' last words were random or inscrutable, there would be no possibility that they would be chosen as the last words of the story. So looking at the rest of that narrative is highly likely to at least give us the meaning Mona Simpson inferred they had.

I think that he

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It is difficult to answer this question within the context of Steve Jobs' own mind, however, it is much easier to answer it within the context in which the quote is found. It is quoted at the end of a eulogy by her biological sister Mona Simpson, an accomplished author.

Logically, we have to assume that if Steve Jobs' last words were random or inscrutable, there would be no possibility that they would be chosen as the last words of the story. So looking at the rest of that narrative is highly likely to at least give us the meaning Mona Simpson inferred they had.

I think the key to understanding this meaning is your memory that:

I believed that love happened all the time, everywhere. In that most important way, Steve was never ironic, never cynical, never pessimistic.


In addition to his characterization of him "embarking" on an "arduous journey" to "a better place", it appears that (again, within this account) these words mean:

  • Steve Jobs was getting to where he was going.
  • He was genuinely excited and full of awe even when faced with death.


The first of these meanings seems destined to complete the story of the eulogy, but the second is much more distinctive and fascinating. In a way, this is the final proof that the excitement and delight some scoffed at and laughed at (that is, when he described the iPad as "magical") was not only real but essential to him. A man who faces the end of life with enthusiasm is the ultimate optimist.

His liver was failing, so he had to suffer a severe case of encephalopathy, which comes with a very altered mental state. So I doubt that everything he said in his last moments, before slipping into a coma and eventually dying, should be considered something worthy of analysis and discussion.

He was heavily medicated for pain, he was almost unconscious. This could have been anything.

The brain does weird things.

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