When did you get your first job and what was it like?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Beckham Hutchinson



When did you get your first job and what was it like?

I started working when I was 15 years old and I worked at Market Basket. Market Basket is a well-known grocery store in the New England area, primarily in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. I worked at Market Basket for a total of 5 years and it was a great foundation for my career. He taught me primarily customer service, but also how to work in a team, how to respect people, and the importance of dressing professionally, even in a grocery store environment. The most important thing about this job was the strong work ethic that I developed.

I started working as a packer and also brought the carriages from the parking lot.

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I started working when I was 15 years old and I worked at Market Basket. Market Basket is a well-known grocery store in the New England area, primarily in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. I worked at Market Basket for a total of 5 years and it was a great foundation for my career. He taught me primarily customer service, but also how to work in a team, how to respect people, and the importance of dressing professionally, even in a grocery store environment. The most important thing about this job was the strong work ethic that I developed.

I started working as a packer and also brought the carriages from the parking lot. I worked short shifts from 3:00 pm to 6:00 pm when I started. In fact, he hated this, since it was straight after school, he had no free time. When I turned 16 was when I started working from 5 pm to 9 pm, which was much better since it was more hours and it allowed me to relax after school.

I can't say that my grades in school suffered due to this due to the fact that I was hardly doing my homework anyway. I would do quite well on tests and quizzes, which is what eventually got me to high school. If I had done my homework and tried harder to write essays, I probably would have done much better in school.

I continued to work during my time in high school. I was promoted multiple times and had the opportunity to work in almost every department. Later, during my time at this company, I even did the floor cleaning overnight, which I hated. He hated being up all night from 9pm to 6am He also hated being alone and plus it was pretty creepy in the shops at night, you hear things you don't normally hear. Aside from being a manager, I did almost everything that had to be done in that store in addition to the bakery, since generally the women worked in the bakery. It was not that only women worked in the bakery, there were men, but that they were mostly women.

I was 20 when I left Market Basket. I had used my experience from there to get another job working for Canon, the camera company, but not working on their cool technology ... I was working for the managed services part of the company. I worked in a mailroom / copy center for a law firm. This was a huge step up from the grocery store and without the customer service knowledge and skills I got from Market Basket, I don't think I would have done well at this job. Lawyers like to be treated like gods (or at least the law firm I worked for), so being a good peasant was important. If you've ever watched Better Call Saul, think of HHM's mailroom ... it was very similar to that, only in a less fancy building.

Just to make a long story short ... I gained experience working with copiers at this law firm's copy center during my time at Canon. From there I got a job as a copier technician for a company called Ricoh. This exposed me more to the IT industry. From there I got a job as a PC technician at a large defense contractor. I got promoted multiple times, and at the age of 25 I'm a systems administrator for this same defense contracting company, which is quite a distinguished role in IT.

So I made big changes in a short time without going to college. I owe it all to the work ethic I got from working at Market Basket.

My first job was at Knoebels Amusement Resort, at the age of fourteen. It was one of the only places near my small hometown that hired kids under the age of sixteen. I went to their job fair and they gave me a position as an ice cream picker at the rate of $ 4.75 per hour (this was in 1999).

I was surprised by the ease with which they gave me a job, taking into account that there were extra procedures to do because of my age and I also had no experience. There were about fourteen different flavors of hard ice cream, plus various ice cream and smoothie options, and I learned them all quickly.

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My first job was at Knoebels Amusement Resort, at the age of fourteen. It was one of the only places near my small hometown that hired kids under the age of sixteen. I went to their job fair and they gave me a position as an ice cream picker at the rate of $ 4.75 per hour (this was in 1999).

I was surprised by the ease with which they gave me a job, taking into account that there were extra procedures to do because of my age and I also had no experience. There were about fourteen different flavors of hard ice cream, plus various ice cream and smoothie options, and I learned them all quickly.

Our tent was outdoors, so one of the things I had to learn even faster was how to keep bugs away from ice cream. To do this, we would take plastic spoons and fold them back, hold them close to a fly, and drop them. The fly would be stunned, and if your aim was good, it would also drift away from the ice cream cubes. This is a "skill" that I still use today when a fly enters my room.

I learned a lot from my first job: how to interact with paying clients, how to work with people from all walks of life, and how to defend yourself when you need a lunch break or a day off. One of the most important things I learned here was not letting the experiences of others dictate my own career decisions.

Here's the story: In this amusement park, there was a live music band that walked through the pavilions where people enjoyed their meals and performed for them. As an aspiring musician, I really, REALLY wanted to play in the band. They performed near us twice a day, and each time I listened longingly as I continued to serve customers. One day, I asked my boss how I could audition for the band in the park. He literally laughed at me out of the room, saying (and I quote), "You'll never get a job with that band. But hey, you're doing pretty good here. Keep it up for another year and you could get a promotion."

His words hurt, but looking back just a few days later, I realized he wasn't being cruel. He was only responding that way because he was bitter about being the manager of an ice cream parlor for a living. This was my first experience with work-related bitterness / boredom, and it was an important lesson. At the time, I could have acted on my boss's words. Instead, I realized that I could fight for the job I wanted FROM the job I already had.

In 2003 I joined the Knoebels marching band, and when I left in 2006 to attend college, I had become a band manager there.

I no longer have this job, but this job and others like it have led me to the wonderful job I have now, and I am grateful for the foothold my first employer gave me :)

Office max. Was 16 years old. It was good. Time passed and my co-workers were doing great. So management decided it was important to make it painful. The man in charge was like Dennis Franz from Die Hard 2. This fat fucking Super Mario Brother. You would be in the hours of say ... 6 am until noon. Then you would get ready to go. "And where the hell do you think you're going?" Look, because he still had an hour and fifty-nine minutes to get you out before it cost him. OfficeMax was not only my first job, but the first in a long list of jobs I had where managers would always have a story.

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Office max. Was 16 years old. It was good. Time passed and my co-workers were doing great. So management decided it was important to make it painful. The man in charge was like Dennis Franz from Die Hard 2. This fat fucking Super Mario Brother. You would be in the hours of say ... 6 am until noon. Then you would get ready to go. "And where the hell do you think you're going?" Look, because he still had an hour and fifty-nine minutes to get you out before it cost him. OfficeMax was not only my first job, but the first in a long list of jobs I had where managers always had a story that didn't ask about why they work there. They were always once a CEO, once a lawyer, once a stock broker. 98 percent of the work consisted of climbing a ladder and carrying heavy cardboard boxes to restock the aisles. One day I dropped one on this bitch's head. For whatever reason, the managers didn't scold me. So ... silly, innocent shit, they'd dig you up. Almost killing someone ... nothing. I appreciated your understanding until I realized what was going on ... Pavlovian manipulation. Would you think ... no way. A bunch of jerks who misspell words like "refund" and "every night" would never know what Pavlovian manipulation is. But all you need is a semester in college, not even two introductory psychology days to learn things like Stockholm syndrome and how to make laboratory animals salivate. One day I really pissed off Dennis Franz because I brought a lost shopping cart into the store upon entering. His boss saw him and congratulated me on my initiative. Franz was like, "Peter? You've got to be kidding me," to which the GM looked at him sternly and said, "No. I'm not. So for the rest of the shift, Franz stared at me and fantasized about my death. And then there were the uniforms. At OfficeMax, you do all this box handling and hauling shit while wearing dress shoes and pants. It has to be one or the other. A job has to be one where you get your hands dirty OR you dress well No one should have to do both. Then the day came that I quit. He claimed to have forgotten that he had posted my two-week notice. I was deeply offended that I was trying to finish high school without working late nights on weekdays. Oh, look at His Majesty here. Don't give up and work here full time like a real man. Fuck you, Sipowitz. Many years later, OfficeMax looks like the Apple Store. No top stock, no heavy lifting, and an ink station that is always empty, meaning clearly no manager has spotted them. When I see how easy they have it now, I feel like Dennis Franz. and an ink station that is always empty, meaning clearly no manager has stained them. When I see how easy they have it now, I feel like Dennis Franz. and an ink station that is always empty, meaning clearly no manager has stained them. When I see how easy they have it now, I feel like Dennis Franz.

It all started in March 2018,

I was in my pre year end and an IT company (let's say Company - X) visited my university to hire interns for the 2019 graduate students. Around 800 students attended, but only 50 were selected for the intern.

Let me tell you my background shortly. I was studying non-IT department at a well-established university in Tamil Nadu, India. Since I knew programming in my high school I got over this so easily and people are still wondering how I could erase it coming from a non-IT department (CS and IT expert coders still couldn't clean

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It all started in March 2018,

I was in my pre year end and an IT company (let's say Company - X) visited my university to hire interns for the 2019 graduate students. Around 800 students attended, but only 50 were selected for the intern.

Let me tell you my background shortly. I was studying non-IT department at a well-established university in Tamil Nadu, India. Since I knew programming in my high school, I got over this so easily and people still wonder how I could erase it coming from a non-IT department (CS and IT expert coders have yet to pull it off).

So the intern started in May 2018 and my family and I were so happy to have an intern from a leading product company in Chennai. It was a wonderful experience and I loved that job to the core. But as the days went by, they started sending people out if their performance wasn't up to scratch. The happy mood suddenly turned into a serious one and we were counting days and we were afraid that TL would call us to the conference room (thinking it might be the termination). Finally, just before a week to the end of our internship, I was fired even though I did well on assessments and assignments.

He was completely broke and was crying when leaving the office. Then I started my senior year in July 2019 and a list of companies started visiting my campus looking for locations.
I bagged four offers in all the BIG - 4 Companies, all my friends and parents were very happy, but I still felt that this was not what I expected. I wanted to join that company again and show them that they might have made the wrong decision, but how?

A week later, I heard that an interview process is underway for the developer role at that company. I prepared very well for that, but failed miserably in the first round (I hate making excuses, but I was not feeling well). This hit me again.

Then I started to focus on my senior project as I felt it was very essential at the time. Days passed Months passed I finally decided to choose an offer from one of the 4 Great Companies.

I completed my last semester exams in the third week of May 2019 and waiting for the call letter from the company I chose. Right after two days of my final exams, I learned that Company-X has a recruiting drive in the nearby city the following weekend.

He was in the swing of whether to go for it or not. (I honestly don't want to be a failure again). But my mom asked me to give her one last chance. He finally decided to take the process and traveled to the nearby city on Saturday morning. I had no preparation and didn't even brush up on my coding skills thinking that I would be rejected again.

The first round was an Apti and Coding round that was attended by around 1700 people.
He was damn sure he wouldn't get over this. After the end, they started announcing the results and, to my excitement, I was selected for the next round (approximately 250 people were selected).

The second round was the basic programming, I clarified it and the third round was the advanced coding and I clarified it as well. Still, I couldn't believe how I did it.

The fourth round was a technical interview that lasted half an hour. As I thought, I was selected for the final round of human resources.
I was so anxious and I thought I would get over this and get an offer, but the interview went really bad and I was so sad that I might have gotten lost for a little space.
They said we would get an email in a couple of days and I was looking for it 24 hours without sleep.

I finally got an offer from that company with a decent package and it was on cloud nine.
That was one of the most successful moments in my life and also a breakthrough in my career.
I joined the company in a week and I continue to live in the moment and enjoy my job.

Moral: Never feel bad about not getting something in life. You are destined to achieve greater things and it will be fruitful one day!

PS: This is my first quora answer. Sorry if there are any grammatical or editing errors.

My first job was with Metro Exterminators in 1964 in Streetsville, Ontario. Helped owner Bill Smith eliminate or eradicate all of the most common infestations. I didn't last long. I was 14 at the time and waking up at 5 in the morning to kill rats and roaches was less attractive than my restful sleep.

Still, I enjoyed the job and never forgot anything he said or showed me. I even invented some of my own tactics and techniques to get rid of the most dangerous pests.

The hours were long but full of adventure, so time was no other problem than getting up on time.

Eventually I became an int

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My first job was with Metro Exterminators in 1964 in Streetsville, Ontario. Helped owner Bill Smith eliminate or eradicate all of the most common infestations. I didn't last long. I was 14 at the time and waking up at 5 in the morning to kill rats and roaches was less attractive than my restful sleep.

Still, I enjoyed the job and never forgot anything he said or showed me. I even invented some of my own tactics and techniques to get rid of the most dangerous pests.

The hours were long but full of adventure, so time was no other problem than getting up on time.

Eventually I became an interior designer and applied my knowledge to designing pest-proof kitchens and restaurants. I used it as an effective sales lead and it worked well.

Fortunately, the requirement to get up early shortened my mandate, because in those days there was no protection against the chemicals we used and traveled with. The 50-gallon cardboard drums were less than the hermetically sealed containers that were transported in the truck. Longer exposure to these chemicals would have shortened my life by decades.

Chemicals that kill insects, people, and pets too.

Interestingly, one of my discoveries at the time was how effective dish soap was in killing or defending against all insects and animals, even bears. It turns out that nothing wants soap in the nose or eyes. So the most useful thing you can have around your home to protect yourself is a squirt gun or soapy water gun. Very effective against hornets, wasps, skunks and raccoons and also against invasions by people.

For skunks, you just squirt their ass as they lift their tails and run. No spray. Raccoons go for the eyes. The same goes for snakes, coyotes, wolves, and bears.

Make sure the solution is slippery with soap. With a squirt gun you can't go wrong as you can move the current while pulling the trigger for a 100% accuracy rate.

Soapy water kills insects like hornets by clogging their blowholes and preventing them from inhaling air. Soak the nests inside as well. Then remove them. They suffocate very quickly. It doesn't work on ants, cockroaches, bed bugs, or silverfish because you can never get them that way. Use latex paint diluted in water for large nests. Make sure you use enough. You don't want to be chased. They are not stupid. They can find you and make your life miserable.

All those exciting things you see on TV are just a joke. No smart pest control operator works like this.

MY AFFECTION WITH LOGINEXT SOLUTIONS - My story up to my first job.

Everyone must be thinking why such a title?

Well, I am a 23 year old Indian boy and I was traveling to GOA (India), an old British man while discussing random things told me that you should always write and describe feelings to loved ones or close people. (In my case it was clear to me that it is my recent encounter, "Loginext".)

So why do I choose to write about Loginext?

Here it goes.

My first meeting was on November 25, 2015 when the company came to my college campus for hiring. I applied for the company because the opportunity was attractive (from

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MY AFFECTION WITH LOGINEXT SOLUTIONS - My story up to my first job.

Everyone must be thinking why such a title?

Well, I am a 23 year old Indian boy and I was traveling to GOA (India), an old British man while discussing random things told me that you should always write and describe feelings to loved ones or close people. (In my case it was clear to me that it is my recent encounter, "Loginext".)

So why do I choose to write about Loginext?

Here it goes.

My first meeting was on November 25, 2015 when the company came to my college campus for hiring. I applied for the company because the opportunity was attractive (of course, the opportunity to work directly with the CEO!). For the Loginext process, around 60 students applied, trust me highly competitive and aspiring minds. Subsequently, after the first round of the GD / PI process, only 10 students were selected (I was one of them). Another round was the personal interview conducted directly by the CEO himself, Mr. Dhruvil Sanghvi.

Yes, the interview went well and all 9 of us were waiting for the results. In the end the time came when the results were declared and guess what it was not me. I was wondering what went wrong, another setback.

Now why am I narrating this story then?

Well that was just the beginning, the story begins here; I met Mr. Dhruvil at the conclave of a renowned B-school. I approached him and wished him with all gratitude. It was interesting to know that he recognized me from the face. He told me hiring day was a second or third choice, but due to overhiring from other B schools, I had to be fired. Well I felt good at least I was considered in such intense competition. The turning point came when he told me that Loginext has few vacancies and that I can apply.

I was happy and with some hope I applied for the available position. Well, after a few follow-ups I got a call from the human resources department. He (HR) was a ray of hope for me. He told me that he has an internship offer and I can be a part of it after a series of interviews and assignments. I accepted it and after a few hours I got an assignment. I was literally passionate about being a part of the firm (be it an internship). After submitting my assignments, I was looking forward to an opportunity to intern. I was willing to be a part of Loginext for a long time. I tried to do my best to get that internship, I was waiting for the result, nothing happened until three days after my presentation.

On January 2 (after a hopeless New Years party), around 10:40 p.m. M. I received a call from an unknown number. Guess what? It was the call from the CEO himself admiring my efforts and the time I have devoted to Loginext. Yes, here is the climax. I received an internship offer.

No, this is not the climax ...

It's not just the internship; I got a full-time job at Loginext, the company I've been looking to work for for months. Mr. Dhruvil admired my efforts and gave me my first job.

Well right now I am in my internship period having a good learning time and evening discussions with my mentor.

What else can you get in a new year? I am very grateful to the Loginext team for giving me my first job.

Learning: Well, it's simple. If you want to get something, prepare to fight for it.

I got my first job when I was 17 years old, in early November of last year. I continue working there.

The job is at Hot Topic at one of my local shopping centers. He basically fell into my lap and I couldn't have asked for a better first job. My manager is married to one of the wrestlers who works in our local independent promotion. I'm a huge fan of wrestling, and the shows are actually where I first met her. She's incredibly cool, and it's great to have a manager that I get along with and who shares one of my biggest passions. The rest of my co-workers are great too and I can get along with them. I enjoy the a

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I got my first job when I was 17 years old, in early November of last year. I continue working there.

The job is at Hot Topic at one of my local shopping centers. He basically fell into my lap and I couldn't have asked for a better first job. My manager is married to one of the wrestlers who works in our local independent promotion. I'm a huge fan of wrestling, and the shows are actually where I first met her. She's incredibly cool, and it's great to have a manager that I get along with and who shares one of my biggest passions. The rest of my co-workers are great too and I can get along with them. I enjoy the atmosphere of the store and I don't mind spending several hours there.

Having a job has been very beneficial for my confidence and self-esteem. Before, I considered myself useless and incompetent, someone who would never be able to handle even the basics of functioning in society, like having a job. Although I only perform basic functions at this point, such as calling clients and folding shirts, it is still the kind of thing that I couldn't imagine doing successfully until I joined and started doing it. It has helped me believe that there could be so much more possible for me. I have handled things that I never thought I could handle, and I will always be grateful to this job for giving me those experiences.

Overall, I was incredibly lucky in the early work arena and it has been a very positive experience for me.

My first job was when I was 14 years old (I don't remember it well now) in the Children's Museum in a department that cared for and handled lizards, snakes and other reptiles. The problem was that lizards, snakes, and other reptiles hated and terrified me. I think I was so excited about having a job (which was a volunteer position by the way) that I ignored the fact that there was absolutely no way I could do that job. I'd like to think that I wasn't naive enough to accept a position that I knew there was a snowballing possibility in Bermuda that I would actually do. If I remember correctly, I believe

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My first job was when I was 14 years old (I don't remember it well now) in the Children's Museum in a department that cared for and handled lizards, snakes and other reptiles. The problem was that lizards, snakes, and other reptiles hated and terrified me. I think I was so excited about having a job (which was a volunteer position by the way) that I ignored the fact that there was absolutely no way I could do that job. I'd like to think that I wasn't naive enough to accept a position that I knew there was a snowballing possibility in Bermuda that I would actually do. If I remember correctly, I think they hired us (my sister, my friend and I) at the museum and did not initially assign us to any particular department.

Anyway, we reported in the area or department (which smelled funny, like animals and dog food) with all these reptiles in glass containers that looked like aquariums. There were huge snakes, a variety of lizards, and other reptiles. I had no idea what they were. I remember looking back at caged guinea pigs (I had never seen one up close and instantly knew I wasn't touching it), rabbits and then something in big brown shoe boxes (?) With little holes in the lid. - I didn't even want to know what might be in those boxes. So when our "boss" (I'll call him Paul) walked in, he introduced us to another boy who was probably around twelve years old and had been working for the museum for the past two summers. Paul then goes on to tell us that our job is to clean the cages and feed the lizards and snakes. He also indicated that we would have to do the cleaning.

Now I'm thinking that Paul is crazy and I'm not going to touch any of those animals, especially snakes, so I grab the broom and start sweeping the floor. My sister and my friend are also looking for a broom because they decided they weren't going to feed any of those animals either. Meanwhile, James goes to the back and comes back with one of the big brown boxes. Then he begins to explain that he is going to feed a snake with the contents of the box. Open the box and there are two huge white rats the size of the box. Looking back, it was cruel to me because those rats couldn't even move in that damn box. Anyway, we are looking at it in horror as if it has three heads. My sister asks him if he is afraid and if he is ever bitten by rats or the snake. While holding this big, pissed-off rat who's also struggling to escape, James nonchalantly replies that rats do bite him sometimes, but it doesn't really hurt that much. Yes, that's it for me. I'm definitely not doing that.

At that time, my sister and my friend also agree that no, they are not doing that either. So, I tell you, I am sweeping the floor (which implies that I will be sweeping the entire shift) practically to let you know that you are alone. The two scour the area to find additional brooms while James goes to feed the rat to the snake. I am about to pass out and of course, in a dramatic way I indicate that I am getting sick. Paul comes back a few minutes later and asks why more animals aren't being fed. I told him I was sweeping the floor. Paul responds that the animals have to be fed first and then I can sweep again. My sister, my friend and I tried to rationalize with Paul that this arrangement was not going to work and if there was anything else we could do. In the meantime, James kept fighting those rats and feeding the animals. I looked at him and thought to myself how traitorous and boastful. What about workers' rights? That job was dangerous and she wasn't even paid (I guess I thought she was a fake Norma Rae passionately defending the abused).

At the time, Paul was getting angry and said something to the effect of: "I have a gum chewer (my sister), a complainer (my friend) and a street sweeper (me), and I have no one but James doing their works." Paul then walks off in exasperation, (who could blame him), when my sister, a friend and I got together and decided that we were going to finish the shift and that we would NEVER go back. My sister and my friend saw me sweep the floor. Finally, it occurred to them to clean the exterior of the glass aquariums. They accepted and fed the guinea pigs and cleaned their cages and then pretended to move between the papers while James fought / fed the snakes and reptiles. Paul never came back to the apartment before that night, at least while we were there. A few minutes before the end of our shift, We said goodbye to James, he advised him to quit as well and wished him luck with the snakes because we would never go back. And we did not.

So in response to your question. It really didn't work out very well.

My first job after graduating from high school was as a long distance telephone operator at the Atlanta, GA telephone exchange. She needed to save money before she could start college and the salary offered was pretty good for young women in those days. There were many calls that still had to be set up by hand at the time, including all long distance calls from public phones, credit card calls and a number of places that could not be dialed directly, because they were manual offices or by some other. reason. The work was varied and interesting; I did it for eight years before I had enough to start studying.

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My first job after graduating from high school was as a long distance telephone operator at the Atlanta, GA telephone exchange. She needed to save money before she could start college and the salary offered was pretty good for young women in those days. There were many calls that still had to be set up by hand at the time, including all long distance calls from public phones, credit card calls and a number of places that could not be dialed directly, because they were manual offices or by some other. reason. The work was varied and interesting; I did it for eight years before I had enough to start studying Chemistry and Physics at Tulane.

At the same time, I also acted as a companion for an aunt who lived alone and needed someone to live with her. This meant that he had food and lodging for a theoretical rent. He didn't have to be with her all the time. He could still sing in the church choir and take singing lessons. I also visited an assistant professor at the university weekly to keep my science up to date. My only other expense was gas for my beloved Norton motorcycle. It had been from my brother, but he gave it to me when he bought a newer model. He also taught me how to keep it in good working order, making it not only an exciting means of transportation but also very cheap.

I started working in the telephone office in early September 1968 and continued there until the end of August 1976. I think my education benefited from this period of "real world" work. My medical education certainly did; I felt much more confident and insightful in dealing with patients than many of my colleagues.

Thank you very much for the A2A, Lorenzo,

Julia

The first job I had was mowing my Uncle Harvey's lawn and, in the winter, removing snow from the driveway and sidewalk. I was 10 when I started working for him and continued until I started college seven years later. As time went by, I added additional clients; By the time I finished high school, I was mowing several gardens.

When I was 12 I started delivering newspapers every day. I had more than 100 houses on my route: I delivered the newspapers and collected the subscription from my clients every month or so. I did that for a few years, until I started high school.

I have my fir trees

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The first job I had was mowing my Uncle Harvey's lawn and, in the winter, removing snow from the driveway and sidewalk. I was 10 when I started working for him and continued until I started college seven years later. As time went by, I added additional clients; By the time I finished high school, I was mowing several gardens.

When I was 12 I started delivering newspapers every day. I had more than 100 houses on my route: I delivered the newspapers and collected the subscription from my clients every month or so. I did that for a few years, until I started high school.

I got my first “real” job (the first job where I received a paycheck that was tax deductible) at age 16, the youngest age at which a person could legally work in Ohio at the time. That job was working as a busboy in a hotel restaurant near where I lived. For the next several years I also worked serving tables and other positions in restaurants if necessary (for example, seating guests, washing dishes, even cooking one day). I also worked in the hotel part for a year or so as a bellboy, carrying luggage to rooms and handling room service.

My first full-time position was as a house painter during the summer between my freshman and sophomore years of college at age 18. And my first "adult" job came when I joined the Navy at 19 years old. And in the almost 40 years since then I have never worked less than full time.

When I graduated from high school in 1968, I had a summer before enrolling in a new community college nearby. My mother was on the library board and knew both the president (the stereotypical banker's wife) and Alice the librarian (the stereotypical maiden, elderly librarian). Alice's student assistant had left and between the three of us, I "volunteered."

It was good, comfortable and exciting work. It was easy to work with Alice. We both liked cats, horses, and books. Not in that order necessarily. The "bad" books were not banned, but they were put under that beautiful

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When I graduated from high school in 1968, I had a summer before enrolling in a new community college nearby. My mother was on the library board and knew both the president (the stereotypical banker's wife) and Alice the librarian (the stereotypical maiden, elderly librarian). Alice's student assistant had left and between the three of us, I "volunteered."

It was good, comfortable and exciting work. It was easy to work with Alice. We both liked cats, horses, and books. Not in that order necessarily. The "bad" books were not banned, but they were placed under that beautiful horseshoe desk.

I did everything, which is the kind of work I like. Helped with book selection, book processing, book shelves, book selection for clients, and whatever else we had to do.

There was shadow in our life. We are open late on Friday, like the rest of the city. Some guys (supposedly) came to raise something thinking Alice was there. Well, I was there too. I didn't take his behavior very well. Later, we accept the help of one of our policemen. Then there is no problem.

That part-time job led to another, at the Sauk County Library. This was a place to buy books that libraries might not be able to get. We select, process and distribute them to libraries and schools. We also had the Super Pickle, an old-fashioned moving van, painted green. We would travel to schools and rural towns and open doors. It was work but quite fun to watch children and adults grab a stack of books. I'd check them and later, in the silence of our room, check them again.

The only wrinkle in that job was riding in the cabin. There was a pothole on 154 near the Lower Narrows that usually made my head bounce off the ceiling.

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