What would Apple be like today if Steve Jobs never died?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Kyrie Buck



What would Apple be like today if Steve Jobs never died?

The short answer is: Apple would be more Mac-centric.

Steve Jobs loved the Macintosh. I loved. He was there to create it, he had a vision, and he did everything he could to keep the Mac firmly in tune with that vision. His vision was one of simplicity, the "computer for everyone," and Apple was actually very good at this during Jobs's two terms.

Not long after Jobs was ousted from Apple in the mid-1980s, the product line became difficult to understand; there were strange and arbitrary limits on the hardware; software engineering departments were out of focus and invested a great deal

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The short answer is: Apple would be more Mac-centric.

Steve Jobs loved the Macintosh. I loved. He was there to create it, he had a vision, and he did everything he could to keep the Mac firmly in tune with that vision. His vision was one of simplicity, the "computer for everyone," and Apple was actually very good at this during Jobs's two terms.

Not long after Jobs was ousted from Apple in the mid-1980s, the product line became difficult to understand; there were strange and arbitrary limits on the hardware; software engineering departments became unfocused and spent a great deal of time writing software that was not commercially successful (look up “Taligent” and “OpenDoc” for a revealing and infuriating part of Apple's jobless story); I would buy a machine that was literally just introduced and it would be obsolete in a few months. By mid-1996, Apple was selling more than 20 different Macintosh models, and most Apple people couldn't tell you why.

When Jobs returned in 1997, he quickly eliminated anything that did not adhere to the original vision of making computers for everyone. By early 1999, it had narrowed down the product line to four (iMac, Powermac G3, Powerbook, Workgroup Server) with the ability to customize specifications through an online store. The products were great too. Focused, personable, and easy to understand.

And no matter how successful the iPod and iPhone may have been in his later years at the company, Jobs was still absolutely determined to make great Macs and make sure there was something dazzling every year or two. Backlit keyboard, built-in webcam, 17 ″ form factor, Unibody construction, magnetic power connector, built-in Wi-Fi antennas ... all of these things, and much more, appeared first on Apple products.

That is what is lacking in today's Macintosh era. Nothing dazzles anymore. Its seemingly high-end computer is known, unkindly, as the "trash can." The professional line of laptops comes with a touch bar that, to many, feels like a gimmick. Its current iMac design has been with us for 13 years with nothing to show but spec hits and weight loss. (Yes, even the iMac Pro is little more than a huge increase in specs.) Professionals who review many Apple products have complained and questioned their new hardware purchases rather than displaying the kind of unbridled enthusiasm when the 15 ″ PowerBook or Blue & White G3 were introduced.

And do you know what those complaints and doubts remind me of? Apple unemployed from the early nineties. We said the same things: "OK, I'll buy this IIvx, it's faster but not as well designed as my old IIx."

Apple would be even bigger than it is today.

All the answers are great, but they focus on the products. Jobs focused on Apple. He had arranged for the creation of the new Apple campus. He was a salesman and marketer at heart, who knew how to design products. He took a chance, but he knew what he was doing. Those risks paid off.

One can only guess what kind of innovative products Apple would have created. I had an Apple TV idea that never seems to have materialized. Personally, I think he needed the cable companies to join him for this. Or maybe just the channels themselves. But he didn't

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Apple would be even bigger than it is today.

All the answers are great, but they focus on the products. Jobs focused on Apple. He had arranged for the creation of the new Apple campus. He was a salesman and marketer at heart, who knew how to design products. He took a chance, but he knew what he was doing. Those risks paid off.

One can only guess what kind of innovative products Apple would have created. I had an Apple TV idea that never seems to have materialized. Personally, I think he needed the cable companies to join him for this. Or maybe just the channels themselves. But it didn't come to fruition because he wasn't there to sell it to content creators and cable companies to start with.

For example, when you were at NeXT, you sold a computer with object-oriented programming. This allows the code to be reused. It does it so you can do more by writing less. The way he sold it: "The code you don't write is the code you don't have to debug."

Not many people can sell things like Jobs and certainly no one at Apple anymore. They don't advertise products like Jobs did. They depend on a different type of marketing. I imagine Apple would have evolved the Apple TV and possibly the Mac. They probably would have invented a handful of new products. Not just a watch, but riskier products. For example, Jobs removed the CD from laptops early on. You could force cultural changes and get away with it. In an interview, Jobs said about the removal of a hardware function, if people do not buy the product, we will know and change it. People criticized his choice, but his choice stuck and people liked that he removed that feature later on. Apple could have taken more risks, created more products,

But for further speculation, as someone said in another answer, the Mac was what Steve Jobs loved and it was there from the start. Converting the desktop to Desktop 2.0 is what I probably would have done, in my opinion. Along with your idea for a new TV, you probably would have created a new home product. But without him to sell the game-changing product, even if they have his design, what can Apple do? They are lost clinging to their still very lucrative and unfinished legacy. Now it appears that Amazon is infiltrating the smart home market, filling the void of what Jobs would have done. Who else? Google tries, but has its own process. All other makers are too big and artistless, like jobs, holding the brush and leading with a vision.

Regardless, he lost the fight against cancer. Your investment in a new headquarters, your idea of ​​a new type of television, it seems to me that Apple would have that product that changes the rules of the game. iPod → iPhone → iPad → new iMac? Who knows. Perhaps even a decentralized Internet.

Pixar had Jobs's fingerprints all over it. He just comes up with the idea that he may have created a product to make both the desktop and the television obsolete at the same time. He had the talent and resources. His sales talent is probably the missing piece that Apple needs to convince cable companies to create change. The first is the first. Getting cable companies to join a new product that fuses television with the Internet, boom! It's hard to imagine the possibilities. However, I think SnapChat is probably on the spectrum for what it would have looked like.

I think that regardless of the products that Apple came up with, Steve would have been the one to sell them and make them come true. Apple would be even bigger for that. Without Jobs, Apple is solved with a different kind of marketing, one not so focused on new products, but on updates and new features of its existing products. They know they can't bring a product to market like Jobs would. They can't take the risks that he could. They are not him.

As someone whose brain is similarly wired to Jobs, I suspect they would have released a bigger iPhone 5 instead of waiting for the 6. Cook said they thought a lot about the size of the 5, but if it was Jobs, only one thing matters, how the customer would feel when entering the store to consider buying it. Women loved the 5, but speaking of men, I was a bit disappointed that there wasn't a bigger "male version." I think he wouldn't have tried to build an iPhone and iWatch that tall ...

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It wouldn't be much different and, in fact, you might be in a worse position. Steve Jobs was not the key to Apple's success. There was a dedicated team of engineers, experts and visionaries, of which Jobs was only a part, who imagined new technologies, refined ideas, and created products while dressing in cloth so that new and innovative technology came to market as a ready-to-use product. use.

This is different from, say, the Newton, which was a good idea but came to market with too many mistakes and unfinished ideas, and thus was lost in time and apathy.

But long before Jobs died, that team had disappeared. Apple was tr

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It wouldn't be much different and, in fact, you might be in a worse position. Steve Jobs was not the key to Apple's success. There was a dedicated team of engineers, experts and visionaries, of which Jobs was only a part, who imagined new technologies, refined ideas, and created products while dressing in cloth so that new and innovative technology came to market as a ready-to-use product. use.

This is different from, say, the Newton, which was a good idea but came to market with too many mistakes and unfinished ideas, and thus was lost in time and apathy.

But long before Jobs died, that team had disappeared. Apple was trapped in the same place where they are now. They have no new ideas and can only continue to refine what they already had.

Like all so-called geniuses, Jobs took all the credit. Usually this works for the purpose of landing a CEO position, but it always fails in the long run. Jobs, like everyone in his class, bought his own BS ​​and alienated his team. When the old members left, they weren't replaced or, rather, they weren't replaced by creative people.

Jobs replaced Apple designers with Apple clients - mindless drones who were excited to have something, anything, as long as it had an Apple logo on it.

  1. He would have struck a deal with Elon Musk to take Tesla privately and combine efforts in building a powerful AI and an autonomous car.
  2. It would still have Tim Cook working on logistics and catapulting Apple's market cap to $ 1T
  3. He would have studied the rise of cryptocurrencies and created a global P2P payment system.
  4. It would not have allowed the Android ecosystem to blindly copy iOS and it would have kept iOS much more stable compared to what we have seen in the last 4 years.
  5. It wouldn't have allowed the extra-large, unintuitive iPhone X without biometrics, it would have focused on having a more powerful MacBook Pr.
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  1. He would have struck a deal with Elon Musk to take Tesla privately and combine efforts in building a powerful AI and an autonomous car.
  2. It would still have Tim Cook working on logistics and catapulting Apple's market cap to $ 1T
  3. He would have studied the rise of cryptocurrencies and created a global P2P payment system.
  4. It would not have allowed the Android ecosystem to blindly copy iOS and it would have kept iOS much more stable compared to what we have seen in the last 4 years.
  5. It would not have allowed for the extra-large, unintuitive iPhone X without biometrics, it would have focused on having stronger MacBook Pros even though they have fewer margins, it would have avoided the tricks seen in most Apple products today. .
  6. It would have negotiated with cable providers to offer live television on demand on Apple TV and iOS devices.
  7. It would have a lot of freedom to explore new industries to innovate with all that money that Apple is accumulating.

It would be very different, but in a good way. First things first, let's talk about the Mac:

Mac Pro would have water cooling, Threadripper / EPYC, NVME or M.2 storage, Nvidia GPU support, cheaper
Pro Display XDR would be 8k Micro-LED, more expensive
iMac Pro would have 6k Mini-LED, Threadripper, more RAM, cheaper
Base 4k iMac would feature Ryzen 7/9 and better memory
All Macbooks would have better keyboards, displays, and webcams
Mac Mini with core i9

They would also dramatically improve your mobile devices:

The iPhone 7–7s would have the iPhone X design with a flat edge

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It would be very different, but in a good way. First things first, let's talk about the Mac:

Mac Pro would have water cooling, Threadripper / EPYC, NVME or M.2 storage, Nvidia GPU support, cheaper
Pro Display XDR would be 8k Micro-LED, more expensive
iMac Pro would have 6k Mini-LED, Threadripper, more RAM, cheaper
Base 4k iMac would feature Ryzen 7/9 and better memory
All Macbooks would have better keyboards, displays, and webcams
Mac Mini with core i9

They would also dramatically improve your mobile devices:

The iPhone 7–7s would have the iPhone X design with flat edges and on-screen TouchID with FaceID.
The iPhone 8–8s will have a full screen with FaceID and TouchID under a sliding screen. Only two iPhone models: normal and plus
The iPad Mini and Air would adopt the current design of the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil 2.
The iPad Pro models would have LG OLED 4k with 144Hz ProMotion displays.

Other than this, they would keep crushing Google and Microsoft in terms of innovation. Android's market share will be much lower than it currently is. Mac will start to take over. Apple and Amazon monopolize the tech industry.

Thanks for the A2A.

If Steve Jobs had never died, of course, Apple would not be the same as it is today. As Apple CEO Tim Cook said, the late Steve Jobs told him not to be like me, do it your way because there is no one like me.

I think your question would be if Steve Jobs were alive today, would Apple be a trillion dollar company? Of course it would be because Steve Jobs was / is / will be the co-founder of Apple. I feel like it would have been better because of your intuitive ability to change the world.

Good question. I think they would be as dominant, if not more, than they are today in the mobile space.

I think the designs we are looking at would be different. Something tells me that Jobs would never have disconnected from the camera bump on the iPhone 6, or the camera slot on the iPhone X screen. Jobs was involved in almost every design coming out of Apple, so this is something what he would have gotten himself into.

I think we would also see a different media presence from Apple at this point. I think Jobs saw a lot coming of what we have now in the streaming landscape, and I think Apple

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Good question. I think they would be as dominant, if not more, than they are today in the mobile space.

I think the designs we are looking at would be different. Something tells me that Jobs would never have disconnected from the camera bump on the iPhone 6, or the camera slot on the iPhone X screen. Jobs was involved in almost every design coming out of Apple, so this is something what he would have gotten himself into.

I think we would also see a different media presence from Apple at this point. I think Jobs saw a lot coming of what we have now in the streaming landscape, and I think Apple would have had a stronger presence in the area by now.

I think Mac may have received a little more love during his continued tenure, but he was also one of the first in the company to recognize dead weight, so who really knows with that.

There's no way to know. Jobs was known for his "reality distortion field," meaning that while you were in his presence, he could make you believe anything. He was a visionary and had strong feelings about design and function. Walter Isaacson's Biography of Him is the first e-book I bought when I got my first iPad!

A lot of credit should be given to Tim Cook and the Apple Board of Directors for moving the company forward after Jobs' death in 2011. I don't consider Cook another Jobs, but he has done a good job.

There is a saying I know, taken (I think) from the title of a book: “Find the

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There's no way to know. Jobs was known for his "reality distortion field," meaning that while you were in his presence, he could make you believe anything. He was a visionary and had strong feelings about design and function. Walter Isaacson's Biography of Him is the first e-book I bought when I got my first iPad!

A lot of credit should be given to Tim Cook and the Apple Board of Directors for moving the company forward after Jobs' death in 2011. I don't consider Cook another Jobs, but he has done a good job.

There is a saying I know, taken (I think) from the title of a book: "Find the irreplaceable people in your organization and fire them immediately!" In other words, no one should be so critical to the success or even the existence of a business, because their loss would spell the death of the business. Jobs was right to choose his successor.

It is not clear what would have happened since he died more than 7 years ago. Since Steve Jobs is not as well versed in traditional corporate culture as Tim Cook, it would have prompted Apple to file more lawsuits if he had put a foot in his mouth. I imagine Steve Jobs could have paid more attention to the Mac lineup, while the iPhone would be less competitive if he got his way and kept screens small and insisted on not hitting the camera.

Well, for one thing, they would have ONE iPhone a year which would be insanely awesome. However, we now have five phones that are missing something that one of the other phones has. Also, you would have a lot less cables! Only ONE cable (very fragile and expensive) would work for each of your Apple products.

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