What was the most unique job interview you have ever experienced?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Kyle Davis



What was the most unique job interview you have ever experienced?

Well. In 2005, when I was still in the tech industry, I had one of the most ridiculous interview experiences.

I actually wrote a blog post about it (I'll link to it, but my blog is more determined NSFW. Follow the links at your own risk).

Extracted:

So I think I've mentioned to them that they've been interviewing me for jobs lately. The dilemma I face is that much of what happens during an interview is blog-worthy; Unfortunately, blogging about a potential employer runs the risk of not landing the job.

Well, never let it be said that I let my career get in the way of entertaining you fu

Keep reading

Well. In 2005, when I was still in the tech industry, I had one of the most ridiculous interview experiences.

I actually wrote a blog post about it (I'll link to it, but my blog is more determined NSFW. Follow the links at your own risk).

Extracted:

So I think I've mentioned to them that they've been interviewing me for jobs lately. The dilemma I face is that much of what happens during an interview is blog-worthy; Unfortunately, blogging about a potential employer runs the risk of not landing the job.

Well, never let it be said that I let my career get in the way of entertaining you motherfuckers. I just had to share this.

I had an interview at a technology company in Northern Virginia. The guy who contacted me is a vice president who happens to be a former military man. It looked pretty nice during the phone's initial screen, albeit a bit ... how do I put this? ... not in touch with this time? The next conversation took place at the bottom of the phone screen.

VP: "So ... it was great talking to you ... Sa-lil. Salil ... Man-ik-taaa-la. Is he Indian?"

Me: "Yes. Yes, it is."

Vice President: (thoughtful) "You know, I met an Indian once. (Note: this is a tech company in Northern Virginia. An Indian ... once?) He used to work here. His name was Nishant XXX (I swear to God he told me the guy's full name, and then he also waited for me to say, "Oh yeah, Nishant! He's Indian, I'm Indian, I know him!") (Of course, in There was actually a 50-50 chance that I would meet him if he was in the DC area, but whatever, he doesn't know! DON'T KNOW!). Yeah, it didn't work out that well. He left. He was. a little ... paranoid. We once sent him to Florida with a team U-Haul and then I got a call from the U-Haul place. The guy was like, yeah, your friend has been here for two hours. He's reviewing the contract and he's crossing out parts,initial and discuss everything. "

Me: "Umm ... well. I'll try not to do any of that."

VP: "Oh no, no, no. Of course not! Hahahahaha! That's not what I meant."

I am fine".

So I set a time to go to an interview. Once again, the interview seems to be going quite well, with one small exception. It asks me if I have experience with NIST-800 work, which I don't have. He looks at his notes (from our phone screen I guess) and he says, "That's weird. I think you said you had experience with NIST-800."

I told him that I was familiar with NIST-800, but never claimed to have done an implementation. What he knew was from the classroom. I'm pretty sure he was mistaking me for someone else.

Anyway, after the interview is over, try to start a little chat again. Again it starts with my name. "Sa-lil. Manik-tahla. Am I saying it right?"

Me: "Yes. You are." (I'm not pointing out that I prefer people to just say everything at once, rather than insert awkward pauses in between)

Vice President: "Hmm. Well, you know what? I'm going to be frank with you, since you're a US citizen just like me. Okay? Ok, great. You know, you really should consider getting a nickname."

Me: (after a pause) "Yeah, well, I actually have one. It's Jay."

Vice President: "Ah, excellent!"

Me: "But I prefer to go for Salil."

Vice President: "Oh. Oh yes, of course. Of course. Good."

Then we walk towards the elevator. In the elevator, he presses the button and then I guess he decides to go three by three. "So. Do you know how you get a certain image of someone when you talk to them on the phone? I mean, it's always amazing to see what they look like in person because you never get it right, right? I'm sure you do. You had a completely different image. of me in your head after you spoke to me on the phone (note: No, my image was actually quite accurate. See above). Well, I thought you would be about three inches taller. "

Me: "It was nice meeting you."

And then God finally left me and opened the fucking elevator door. I practically immersed myself as Sarah Connor avoiding the cop in Terminator 2.

Seriously, does this shit happen to anyone else?

It was then that I joined the Croatian Armed Forces in Bosnia as a foreign volunteer.

I had a handwritten note with me with the address of their recruitment office, but when I went to the Zagreb city center location, there were only a few fruit and vegetable stores there.

I showed my newspaper to a vendor and he pointed to a small alley that led behind the buildings. I climbed a narrow staircase to the second floor and rang the bell. There was no sign of anyone living there and the hallway looked very miserable and deserted.

A young man, perhaps in his twenties, opened the door.

Keep reading

It was then that I joined the Croatian Armed Forces in Bosnia as a foreign volunteer.

I had a handwritten note with me with the address of their recruitment office, but when I went to the Zagreb city center location, there were only a few fruit and vegetable stores there.

I showed my newspaper to a vendor and he pointed to a small alley that led behind the buildings. I climbed a narrow staircase to the second floor and rang the bell. There was no sign of anyone living there and the hallway looked very miserable and deserted.

A young man, perhaps in his twenties, opened the door and I told him in English what I wanted. He didn't seem surprised and let me into a small anteroom where he told me to sit in a chair in the corner of the room.

I did what he told me to do and started looking around: besides the guy who had let me in, there was another working in the same office. This was a kind of reception room that led to two adjacent offices. I looked at the walls, the desks, but couldn't see anything that looked military. Maybe they gave me the wrong address?

I didn't have to wait long until they called me at one of the two offices. The one I entered appeared to be the main office; There was a large wooden desk and behind it was a guy who had an air of "authority."

Behind him was a huge four-and-a-half meter long aluminum plane tail hanging from the wall. A large red "communist" star was painted in the middle.
The man behind the desk was in his early fifties, very thin, and had dark (colored?) Hair. As he spoke on an antique phone, he looked at me curiously and motioned for me to sit in a chair that was in front of his desk.

When he hung up the receiver, he addressed me in fluent German:

"How I can help?"

I started with my prepared speech ("I'm German and I want to volunteer for the Croatian armed forces in Bosnia ..."), but he interrupted me:

"I'm sorry, young man, but I have to disappoint you, we are doing humanitarian aid here, we are not hiring people for war."

I told him that I had taken his address from a soldier I had met at the Ministry of Defense. He demanded to see the newspaper, read it, shrugged, and handed it back to me.

Again: "I'm so sorry, but you're in the wrong place."

I did not know what to do. This game went on for a while and I was getting impatient. I pointed to the sunken plane behind him and said:

"Humanitarian aid? Is that why you have half a Yugoslav fighter plane hanging on the wall?

He smiled a little, gestured with his index finger for me to wait a moment, and dialed a number on his office phone. He barked a short order into the receiver and hung up.

A guy, maybe thirty years old, very muscular, came into the office, and although he was wearing jeans and a T-shirt, everything in his habit screamed: combat soldier!

He stood to my left, listening to what the boy behind the desk was saying (probably about me; they spoke Croatian and I couldn't understand them). Every now and then the 'soldier' ​​would look in my direction.

When his 'boss' finished, the soldier started talking to me in English:

“So you want to fight for us? Are you sure about that? Do you know how dangerous this is?

From the tone of his voice, I could tell that he was seriously concerned and that he wasn't making fun of me.

I replied that I was absolutely sure and that I had thought very carefully about my decision. My last line was a lie (I hadn't really 'thought' about it; my decision was not based on any reason) and maybe the boy was sorry because the next thing he did was a bit of a shock to me. :

He stood in front of me, leaned over so that we were face to face, and pointed at the left side of the face.

Before he came face to face with me, he had only been able to see his right side, but now, I could see a large scar running from his left temple across the entire left side of his face. He wasn't an expert on scars, but to me, he looked very cool.

He told me this was from artillery shrapnel that had hit him three weeks ago and that he had been in the hospital until last week. He continued his talk:

“You have no idea how it feels when thirty Serbs storm your trench. Think about it! Do you have some money? Take it and have a nice vacation on the Adriatic coast, then go back to Germany! "

As I went on and on, the older one was studying my face. Finally, the soldier stopped and they were both waiting for my answer.

I told them I hadn't changed my mind.

They looked at each other, sighed, and then the older one took a typewriter and started writing something. The soldier told me that he was now officially a soldier of the Croatian Defense Council. He told me the place I had to go and the unit I would serve with.

Then they explained to me how I would get to my unit in Bosnia (by bus). The eldest gave me my marching papers and some money for travel expenses. We all stood up, shook hands and wished me good luck.

I arrived at the battlefront less than forty-eight hours later.

This job interview, which I am about to share, is a dream come true. A dream come true when it comes to what I experienced. Because I never thought I could live an interview like this. I didn't even know that interviews like this existed. The happiness I felt from this experience is out of this world. The best and most unique job interview I have ever experienced in my entire life.

For privacy reasons, I will not be able to reveal the position and the company. But I can say that the position is in the aviation industry. The work was based in the Middle East

Keep reading

This job interview, which I am about to share, is a dream come true. A dream come true when it comes to what I experienced. Because I never thought I could live an interview like this. I didn't even know that interviews like this existed. The happiness I felt from this experience is out of this world. The best and most unique job interview I have ever experienced in my entire life.

For privacy reasons, I will not be able to reveal the position and the company. But I can say that the position is in the aviation industry. The work was based in the Middle East.

I saw this dream job online and applied through your career site.

After two days, I received an email informing me that my application was being reviewed. I was super happy with this email. An email that has nothing special. But for me, this email was really special. Because being shortlisted for a popular position is a big deal. Being shortlisted from x amount of people is a big deal for me. Not every day you are shortlisted. Also beating the ATS is always a joy. If you don't know what an ATS is, read this article to learn more about this hiring system:

8 things you need to know about applicant tracking systems

A few weeks later, I received another email. "We are pleased to inform you that you have been invited for an interview." I don't think I can explain how I felt when I read that email. I felt like I had won something big. Wish I could save that feeling and put it in a box. To be able to open the box from time to time to experience that euphoric and extraordinary happiness.

This is a special role and the number of people applying is great. Being shortlisted for an interview for this position is huge.

Anyway, I was informed that this interview will take place at the headquarters of this airline. In other country. They informed me that they will take me by plane for the interview. All expenses paid. I will be there two nights and the interview will be one day. They sent me several documents to sign.

A few days before departure I received the plane tickets and all the information. I received information about the hotel where I will be staying during the interview. They informed me that there will be a driver at the airport, who will take me to the hotel.

It felt like going on vacation. Don't go to an interview.

The day came and I began the journey. When I landed, I was escorted by an airport service agent. I went through the "express lane" customs, etc. The airport service agent led me to the driver. The driver was going to take me to the hotel. I felt like a kind of VIP, being assisted with everything.

I arrived at the hotel, which was in the center of the city. The hotel reception informed me that they had booked a driver for me. To take me to headquarters for the morning interview. It was surprising how well planned all of this was. How organized all this was. Everyone at each stage was informed and managed their duties in an amazing way. I was so impressed by the excellent customer service I had received throughout.

I arrived at night. I didn't sleep that well. I was anxious and tried to prepare for the interview.

In the morning I was extremely nervous and stressed. So many thoughts and emotions that went through my mind.

Anyway, I was in for a big surprise when I went to the hotel lobby to meet the driver. I saw 19 other candidates in the hotel lobby. They were all going to the SAME interview. I thought I was the only guest for this interview. But no, 19 others were also invited. I was very surprised. So this airline had paid and transported 20 candidates from all over the world to attend this interview. Crazy and amazing.

There was a man in the lobby who had a list of all of our names. He checked that they were all there. Then we all got on some minibuses that would take us all to the interview site. Headquarters. There were candidates from all over the world. There were candidates from Australia, Brazil, France, South Africa, Romania, UK, Turkey, China, Japan, India, Spain, and the list goes on. 20 unique candidates. When we got to headquarters, we all met a representative from Human Resources. This lady took us to the conference room where we would have our interviews.

I thought we would have an interview and finish. But no, there was a long list of stages in the hiring process that we had to complete. All in one day.

We all sat in the conference room. There were four recruiters there. They began to introduce themselves and the airline. They talked about the position. We were told that we will do several evaluations and interviews.

After that, we all introduce ourselves. All of us who were invited to this interview, we all had aviation experience. One way or another. The candidates were between 23 and 36 years old. There were only two men and the rest were all women.

We start with a group exercise. They divided us into some groups and gave us some words related to work. Then we had to talk about those words and why they were important for that role. We take a little break and then we start with another evaluation. This time it was an individual presentation. We had to present various themes and our reflections on those themes. Of course, the issues were role-related. All of these were typical behavioral assessments. They wanted to see if we were a good match for the role or not.

After this, we had a written test. All the questions we received were related to the role. We took another little break and when we got back, something crazy happened.

The recruiters told us that we were all going to get "diets."

That?!! I thought.

They told us that this was part of our invitation. The airline's way of welcoming us here. A recruiter came over and handed out envelopes with cash. Then we had to sign a document indicating that we received this letter and the cash. The amount we obtained was approximately USD 55. Never in my entire life have I received a fucking envelope during an interview, with cash.

What the hell? LOL.

However, it was a very positive and delightful surprise. They didn't have to do this. But I guess it was part of the "package". Why? I do not know. We got the flight, the hotel, and now the "food allowance."

Anyway, after that, we had the lunch break. When we returned, we had quick one-on-one 10-minute interviews. We had to go to another room to answer some questions. The questions they asked us were about our resume. Our previous and current work experience. Our academic training. They asked us to tell a little about ourselves and why we want to work as xxxxxxx. Why this airline, etc. Typical interview questions.

After this stage, we had another little break. When we got back, we did another group exercise. After this stage they asked four of us to go to another room with them. We all wondered why they selected those four candidates and not us. They selected two boys and two girls. We were all curious about this. The four of them left and we had another break.

Damn, we had 10,000 breaks during this process. Then those four candidates returned to the conference room. We asked them what happened and why they asked them to go with them. They said they had shortlisted those four candidates for another position. That they had a short interview for that role. I suppose that during the evaluations and group exercises that we did so far, the recruiters could evaluate and select those candidates who would be a better fit in the other position.

What a crazy hiring day.

After that surprise, the recruiters talked a bit more about the position. This time they talked a lot about the rules and regulations. They even mentioned that we had to sign a confidentiality document if we got this job, etc. Then we had another break. At this point, I was so tired of walking in and out of the conference room during breaks. At that time it was 3 pm. We started the day at 9 in the morning. A very long day of activities, anxiety and stress. So many emotions running through you.

When we all returned to the conference room, they told us that they wanted to speak with us individually in another room. So they called each of us to go back to another room. But this time things were different. When I was in the room they told me it was the last meeting. They thanked me for my time and told me that I will receive the results by email, within a week. They asked me if I had any more questions, etc.

I was informed that a lady is waiting outside the conference room. Take me with a driver to take me back to the hotel. When I got out, I saw five other candidates outside. We all follow this lady to find the driver.

We got on a minibus that would take us back to our hotel.

We arrived at the hotel. I went to my hotel room and sat on the bed. I sat there to process everything. The whole day was crazy. Nothing I've ever experienced before. What the hell just happened. He was exhausted and tired beyond belief. I took a shower and ordered room service. Then I went to sleep. He had a flight to catch in the morning. Fly back home.

When I arrived at the airport the next morning, I kept thinking about the entire hiring process. I was happy. Very happy and grateful to have had the opportunity to experience such a unique recruiting process. I was in a really good mood until I saw someone.

I was walking through the airport shops and I saw another girl. I recognized that girl. That girl was one of the candidates who was with me in the interview for that position. I got excited and went to say hello.

What he told me next ruined my mood and my day. I ruin everything. I hated the information you told me. I wish I had never seen that girl at the airport. It really ruined my whole day.

He told me that when I left the interview, with the other five candidates. That the six candidates that we left were all rejected. That when we left they had continued with the interviews. That continued until 8 pm. The six of us who left were eliminated.

When we left, the recruiters had congratulated the remaining 14 candidates. That they told the other four candidates that they had gotten that other job. So those 10 got the original role too. This girl was among the 14 who got the job. They all signed tons of papers. The recruiters told everyone that if they saw us they couldn't discuss this with us. They can't tell us they rejected all of us. Or they got the jobs. But this girl told me anyway.

I wish this girl had never told me. Knowing what happened after we left made me very sad. Sometimes it is better not to know certain things than to know. Our conversation ruined my mood and my day. It made me feel like a failure. I felt so betrayed by the company and the staff. They all acted cunningly. He sent us all and didn't tell us we were turned down. So sneaky.

Then after our little discussion, I had to go to my boarding gate to catch my flight.

Such a depressing ending.

A week later the rejection email arrived. It was a very generic email. Very short and cold.

Overall, this was the best job interview process I have ever experienced in my entire life. I am happy and grateful that I had the opportunity to experience a job interview process like this.

Even if the ending was terrible and the worst, I am happy for this great job interview experience.

In fact, I was one of the hiring managers. We had a lady who came for an interview. She had traveled about 300 miles to get here, coming from her big city to mine. My first thought was why can't you find a job in your city?

This was for a computer networking job. We did everything from physical cabling to software uploads. Nothing on his résumé said he had experience except a short time at a materials company. This is one of those places where customers drive with their own truck or trailer and can buy topsoil, gravel, rock, etc.

We use the panel interview process where

Keep reading

In fact, I was one of the hiring managers. We had a lady who came for an interview. She had traveled about 300 miles to get here, coming from her big city to mine. My first thought was why can't you find a job in your city?

This was for a computer networking job. We did everything from physical cabling to software uploads. Nothing on his résumé said he had experience except a short time at a materials company. This is one of those places where customers drive with their own truck or trailer and can buy topsoil, gravel, rock, etc.

We used the panel interview process where the entire team met with each candidate. Each member was allowed to ask a question. You need to remember that the interview process is where we screen out candidates that we think don't fit in, that we don't like them for any reason, or that we don't believe in their resume. It was clearly in the third category.

My coworker asked her to describe a situation at work where an unexpected problem occurred that required immediate attention and how she handled it. My group faced the unexpected on a daily basis. With more than 300 locations across the state, including some very large sites with hundreds of connected devices, there was rarely a day that something didn't work out.

He told us that there were two buildings on either side of the driveway to his property. The sales office was on one side and the back office employees were in the other building. They had run a fiber optic cable between the two buildings to connect all the equipment. One day a large gravel truck arrived to drop its load at the rear of the property. When the driver was leaving, he had forgotten to lower the garbage can from his truck. As he emerged, his bucket caught the fiber optic cable that ran through the two buildings. He kept going, which took all the computers off the desks and they piled up against the wall.

Now if some real guy on the net is reading this, we all know the story was total nonsense. But it was fun listening to it. My gut tells me that what they really had was a 10base2 network.

I can write a book about interviews. Part of my HR job is recruiting. I'm sure your question was for the person you interviewed, but I thought it would give you a perspective from across the desk.

So yesterday a man unannounced my office (there are 4 of us in the administration, so it is a main office). I was talking to a young man who just finished his application when this guy walks in. I had requested it a week before. His English is sad for someone who has worked at McDonald's for 15 years and speaks very loud. Without apologizing he interrupts me talking to the young man

Keep reading

I can write a book about interviews. Part of my HR job is recruiting. I'm sure your question was for the person you interviewed, but I thought it would give you a perspective from across the desk.

So yesterday a man unannounced my office (there are 4 of us in the administration, so it is a main office). I was talking to a young man who just finished his application when this guy walks in. I had requested it a week before. His English is sad for someone who has worked at McDonald's for 15 years and speaks very loud. Without apologizing, he interrupts me talking to the young man sitting at my desk basically yelling because he is talking too loud and asking me "please, do you have work for me?" I said that I'm with someone right now because he apparently can't see the person on my desk. He shakes his head but keeps asking in Spanish if I speak Spanish. I reminded him, “no, I don't speak Spanish, I don't have anything available for you. Do you understand? "I asked him. He proceeded to look at me and speak Spanish out loud. I repeated, I don't speak Spanish. I don't have a vacancy, do you understand me? He continued speaking Spanish as he stood next to me. My coworker who was watching this scene in dismay asked him: "Are you talking on the phone ?!" In fact it was. He was interrupting my day to ask about a job and instead of listening to me, he just answered his Bluetooth and stood over me speaking loudly in Spanish to someone on his phone. I basically had to ask him to come out. He was interrupting my day to ask about a job and instead of listening to me, he just answered his Bluetooth and stood over me speaking loudly in Spanish to someone on his phone. I basically had to ask him to come out. He was interrupting my day to ask about a job and instead of listening to me, he just answered his Bluetooth and stood over me speaking loudly in Spanish to someone on his phone. I basically had to ask him to come out.

He stood directly outside the door continuing their phone conversation aloud. Then someone called on his behalf. Now, to be fair, I just spoke to this guy just a week ago. His English was broken, but he seemed to be able to explain that he was not happy with his work. Rudeness comes in all languages. Here are some tips on how to get a job.

  • When you are following up on a request if the interviewer is with someone, sit down and wait your turn.
  • If you can't speak the language, bring an interpreter and both of you sit on your asses
  • Never stand on the person who can give you a job.
  • Never, and I mean never answer your phone when trying to get a job and proceed to speak out loud to that person while standing next to the person who can give you a job.
  • Don't have someone call on your behalf within 2 minutes of being asked to leave because the person you are interviewing is interviewing someone else!

Needless to say, I'm not going to hire that guy. That's one in a million stories….

Oh yeah, don't smoke meth before you randomly drop in and idly ask "are you hiring?" While your girlfriend calls you a fool ... that's another story.

Job candidates must be prepared for just about anything in an interview these days. Sometimes it's crazy what interviewers feel compelled to ask.

You used to be able to expect traditional questions like "Tell me what was your biggest challenge at your last job." It would arrive well rehearsed, reasonably certain that it would do well.

But now interviewers are asking questions like, "Why are manhole covers round?" or "What superhero would you like to be?" You no longer know what to expect and you certainly don't know how to prepare.

Meanwhile, he wonders whether employers are delib

Keep reading

Job candidates must be prepared for just about anything in an interview these days. Sometimes it's crazy what interviewers feel compelled to ask.

You used to be able to expect traditional questions like "Tell me what was your biggest challenge at your last job." It would arrive well rehearsed, reasonably certain that it would do well.

But now interviewers are asking questions like, "Why are manhole covers round?" or "What superhero would you like to be?" You no longer know what to expect and you certainly don't know how to prepare.

Meanwhile, he wonders if employers are deliberately trying to trip him up. That's not very nice, is it?

As silly as these questions may sound, there is a serious reason behind them.

Employers are more cautious, now taking almost twice as long as 2010 to make hiring decisions. That's because hiring mistakes are costly. A difficult interview process, with questions designed to elicit honest and thoughtful answers, gives you one more tool to narrow down the field of candidates.

A creative line of questions can produce richer tests than the standard "tell me about yourself" type of query. They hope to learn how you get along with others, how you resolve conflicts and deal with difficult problems, if you will fit in with the culture, and how you handle the unexpected.

So now that you know there is a method to this seeming insanity, here are some strange types of questions you may encounter, what the interviewer hopes to learn, and how to think about your answer.

Teamwork
Imagine that you are at sea and your captain falls overboard. How would you work with the crew to get them back on the ship?

A question like this can be jarring at first, because you have to put yourself in this weird hypothetical situation first (and hopefully you aren't afraid of water). Your answer will indicate if you prefer to work alone or if you feel comfortable working. with other people in a high stress situation, as well as your willingness to take on a leadership role.

Motivation
Would you rather win at Jeopardy or Survivor?

These types of questions seek to discover what excites you the most. Would you choose the game that requires prior preparation and study, or the one that requires adventure and delving into the unknown? With any kind of question, be prepared to answer the "why?" which will invariably come later.

Logic
How many basketballs can fit in this room?

Your first thought may be that the interviewer must really like basketball, very much. But, they really want to see how well you think, analyze the situation and attack the problems. If numbers aren't your strong suit, don't panic - the interviewer will hope you take a little more time to formulate your best estimate. But it never hurts to brush up on your estimating skills, just in case you have a problem like this.

Decision making
What would you do if you just inherited a pizzeria from your uncle?

You might be surprised to find that he even has an uncle, much less his own pizzeria. The interviewer wants to know how you approach an opportunity, how enthusiastically you adapt to new situations, and your appetite for risk. They want to see an orderly thought process and evidence of decision. Regardless of your role or experience, it would be wise to discuss the need for a deep understanding of the state of the business before taking any action.

Personality
What is your spirit animal?

Certainly a question like this can take you by surprise. At the simplest level, the interviewer can look for a spark of creativity and willingness to play along (if their first instinct is to scoff at the question, that may indicate a cultural mismatch). They want to find out how you see yourself and your answer can symbolize where you see yourself on the food chain. They could also be looking for evidence of what others think of you.

Remember: there are often no right or wrong answers to many of these questions, so answer honestly and to the best of your ability.

Even if you are temporarily stumped, don't let the question make you too upset, because the worst thing you can do is refuse to play along and answer the question. You can always say, "Okay, let me think about that." Then use that pause to buy some time as you formulate your best answer.

If you can accept each question as a challenge and an opportunity to discover something new about yourself, you might even enjoy the conversation that results.

On behalf of my friend Tolya.

1992 ... Ukraine post-USSR, city of Kiev ... Economic crisis, inflation and uncertainty.

A 20-year-old sergeant, Tolya had just returned from a 2-year mandatory military service.

Skills learned and acquired: 1) eat whatever is edible; 2) smoke the cheapest and stinkiest cigarettes, one pack per day; 3) smoking tea and leaves (yes, those leaves too, if available, but usually only the ones that come out); 4) drink anything that burns; 5) sleep standing up with your eyes open (I'm not kidding); 6) Armenian curses (the captain of his company was Armenian).

Had his wallet

Keep reading

On behalf of my friend Tolya.

1992 ... Ukraine post-USSR, city of Kiev ... Economic crisis, inflation and uncertainty.

A 20-year-old sergeant, Tolya had just returned from a 2-year mandatory military service.

Skills learned and acquired: 1) eat whatever is edible; 2) smoke the cheapest and stinkiest cigarettes, one pack per day; 3) smoking tea and leaves (yes, those leaves too, if available, but usually only the ones that come out); 4) drink anything that burns; 5) sleep standing up with your eyes open (I'm not kidding); 6) Armenian curses (the captain of his company was Armenian).

If her portfolio had been even more impressive, Tolya would still have had trouble finding a good job. So after 4 months of desperate job search, he decided to swallow his pride and become a policeman. Back then it was easy to do and there was a high demand for soldiers who had just returned home. But…

very few normal men would want to work as policemen in Ukraine.

You don't want to be a cop unless there is something fundamentally wrong with you ... or you are in dire financial straits.

Tolya was. He asked us for forgiveness and understanding, we knew how difficult it was for him to take this step… he was our friend after all.

We went together to the police station where his interview had been arranged. Our plan was to wait for him and after the interview go into town for a few drinks and a chat.

The interview lasted a minute.

This is what happy Tolya, who couldn't hold back her tears of joy, told us on the way to a pub:

I walked in and said, "Hello, Comrade Senior."

The older man looked at my CV, scratched his triple chin with a pencil, looked up and said:

-Hi… You are Kievana, Tolya. Are you willing to beat the fu @@ k of your city boys?

And that was it. "No, Comrade Senior, thank you" (Go hit your dick on the fu @@ k with your dick, Comrade Senior. If you can find it, you fat pig ")

2018. Kiev, Ukraine. Tolya is a watchmaker, is married and has two wonderful children.

I was interviewing for a job that was essentially a chief of staff position for a senior executive. She was a well-known woman, the wife of a high-level politician, and was heavily involved in civic causes in our area. So maybe my expectations were high because of that, but this is how it happened:

-Spend the first 5 minutes of my interview at your desk checking your email.

-After a very generic and frankly lazy question about my qualifications, she immediately moves on to the type of boss I work well with and if my current boss was that guy.

-I have been in enough interviews to know how

Keep reading

I was interviewing for a job that was essentially a chief of staff position for a senior executive. She was a well-known woman, the wife of a high-level politician, and was heavily involved in civic causes in our area. So maybe my expectations were high because of that, but this is how it happened:

-Spend the first 5 minutes of my interview at your desk checking your email.

-After a very generic and frankly lazy question about my qualifications, she immediately moves on to the type of boss I work well with and if my current boss was that guy.

-I've been in enough interviews to know how to professionally answer a question like this, but she was visibly agitated and asked what bothers me about my current boss.

-continues for the next 10 minutes to try and get me to say something negative about my boss, which of course I would not

-abruptly shifts to a 5 minute bitch session about her direct reports

-then proceeds to start throwing scenarios out at me that all revolve around whether or not I would rat out people in the company for gossiping and backstabbing

-continues to get annoyed and keeps rephrasing the same questions over and over

-next I'm sent in to be interviewed by her 5 direct reports, which went great and I even found myself saying this seems like a great group of people I could work with

-I'm sent back in to talk with her again and she starts by asking me what they said

-I recapped what we talked about, and she rolls her eyes and says “what did they say about me?”

-at this point, I'm formulating the words in my mind for cutting this inteview short while I respond that we talked about the position, the culture and my experience (not her). She leans forward in her chair and snarls “they didn't say anything about me?”

-This is where I shift to I'm done demeanor and start gathering my things ready to thank her for her time and concede that it doesn't seem the position is a good match. suddenly she sits back and smiles and starts talking about the benefits and details of the company, saying things like “"when you come on board.” WTH?

-finally abruptly ends the interview by saying "I think I have more interviews, I don't know, but somebody will call you.”

yeah thanks. And I won't be answering.

Recently, a recruitment agent approached me looking for an opportunity in Amsterdam. The job sounded good, I presented my requirements to the agent, who then validated them with HR before the first interview took place.

I passed three successful interviews and reached the final stage. All the interviews were positive, everything seemed to fit and the HR has assured me that they are willing to discuss an offer as soon as possible, but before that they would like me to meet with their partner in Amsterdam the following week to position myself. I correctly in the company.

We agreed on the

Keep reading

Recently, a recruitment agent approached me looking for an opportunity in Amsterdam. The job sounded good, I presented my requirements to the agent, who then validated them with HR before the first interview took place.

I passed three successful interviews and reached the final stage. All the interviews were positive, everything seemed to fit and the HR has assured me that they are willing to discuss an offer as soon as possible, but before that they would like me to meet with their partner in Amsterdam the following week to position myself. I correctly in the company.

We agreed on the logistics, the exact date / time and I booked my flight. HR says we'll take care of the rest.

I land in Amsterdam and to my first surprise - no hotel booking. I call HR, they apologize and advise me not to book anything over the internet but to go directly to few hotels which they had called the day before and were available for the night. I hopped on/off the hotel bus on every stop until I managed to find a room available and make the booking for the night.

It wasn't a pleasant experience but I had no idea there was more to come.

I slept for few hours, woke up, showered, packed and booked an Uber to my meeting. I arrived 15 minutes earlier, sat by the reception desk, got connected then sent a friendly email with my exact location.

Tic toc, no answer. I decide to call the number I was given, nothing. I started to worry a bit. Then I receive this email “Be down in 5”.

I wait another 25 minutes. Then this man shows up. We shake hands and to my surprise no apology on being late either. Weird! - But this was just the beginning!

We agree to move to a quieter place to sit. I take few seconds to put my laptop back into my luggage before I realize that he walked away roaming the place for a seat while I was way behind. Weird!

We sat and started talking, he presented himself for few minutes. The minute I talk he goes “Sorry, shall we get something to drink?” then the man stands and heads to the counter without bothering to ask what I wanted. He then brings two cups of coffee (one with milk and one without) asking me which one I would choose!

Awful! I was pinching myself that moment, but clearly not dreaming!

The discussion goes on and I realize he did not read my CV, had no clue who I was, had no clue I flew to meet him (as he was surprised to see my cabine luggage), and he would go on asking irritating questions until I felt this wasn’t for me, turn off completely and show him my disinterest to join!

The most unprofessional person, the weirdest interview ever. Amsterdam was great though!

Personally, I had an interview a few years ago with a company that made displacements when companies had layoffs due to errors. They had an agreement not to hire any of the layoff employees for 6 months. One day after the 6-month mark, I got a call from them for an interview. So I went and everyone was nice and it looked good. They called me for an interview with the other managers and they told me to keep it open all day. Well. So I went early in the morning and they walked me with a different manager about once an hour, I did a tour of the facilities, if the work area and at noon they were taken to a

Keep reading

Personally I had an interview quite a few years ago with a company that did outplacements when companies had bug layoffs. They had an agreement not to hire any of the employees from the layoff for 6 months. One day past the 6 month mark I got a call from them for an interview. So I went and everyone was nice and it looked good. They called me for a meet the other managers interview and told me to keep the whole day open. Okay. So I went early in the morning and was toddled around to a different manager about once an hour, had a tour of the facility, if the work area and at noon was taken to a very nice seafood restaurant where it was me vs about 8 managers. I felt like I was under a microscope. Then back to the office and I finished the manager interviews. (Btw this was before cell phones.) I was exhausted and really not very interested if this was the way they interviewed. (Job was HR manager.). I got home and came I and said to my hubby" If they call I'm not in". He said I was too late, they'd already called and wanted a callback. He said they would be waiting for my call tonight. So I called them back and they made me an offer of about 20% more money than I was currently making. I declined and they said what would it take to bring you onboard? I asked for a minute and then said there would be three things: salary that essentially doubled what I was currently making, 6 weeks vacation a year, and fully paid health benefits from day 1. They told me I'd have the offer letter the next day (a Saturday). It arrived via FedEx and there was also a $10,000 signing bonus. How could I turn this down? No way. So I worked there quite happily for several years. And there were also quarterly bonuses and just a shipload of perks. It was a dream job.

I had this strange interview on skype. The position was for an electronics engineering intern. I am a master's student in the first semester and it is so.

Interviewer: What is your master's grade point average?

Me: As I mentioned, I am in the first semester. So I don't have a GPA.

E: Okay, so there is a problem for you. Estimate the number of dentists in the city of Berlin.

Me: (Thinking it must be related to analytical skills) I need some data on the city before making any predictions.

I eat?

Me: popluation (might this help)

Me: X million

I: X / 100 million

E: How did you get to that number?

Me: I just ma

Keep reading

I had this strange interview on skype. The position was for an electronics engineering intern. I am a master's student in the first semester and it is so.

Interviewer: What is your master's grade point average?

Me: As I mentioned, I am in the first semester. So I don't have a GPA.

E: Okay, so there is a problem for you. Estimate the number of dentists in the city of Berlin.

Me: (Thinking it must be related to analytical skills) I need some data on the city before making any predictions.

I eat?

Me: popluation (might this help)

Me: X million

I: X / 100 million

E: How did you get to that number?

Me: I just made an educated guess

I: What is the basis of your conjecture?

Me: Its just that 1 dentist for 100 people should be sufficient. (Mind it, I might be wrong but I just made a guess as it was just a random problem statement). I said, I need more data such as population of children adults and old age people or Average time taken by dentist to attend one patient or any such information which could be related in any way to the problem.

I: Okay, lets leave this problem and I will ask you another question.

Me: Okay

I: Predict the number of car mechanics in city of Berlin.

Me: *In my mind, What the fuck is this*

*Same stort for next 3–4 minutes*

He signs off by saying that I can re apply once I have my GPA for the first semester. All this time he had covered his camera in a skype interview and asking me not to switch off my camera. It was such a weird experience that even till date I wonder what was he trying to figure out by asking such questions.

I hope I was able to contribute a bit to the question. Thanks for reading :)

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.