What was Steve Jobs really like?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Nina Figueroa



What was Steve Jobs really like?

Talking about pure research Steve Jobs Theater is great!

The theater's actual audience reveal to the public is on September 12, the same day the iPhone 8 or other new devices are supposedly unveiled. The theater sits next to the 'spaceship' with only 1,000 seats in total. (Which makes public events for Apple more exclusive than the last event that took place at the 7,000-seat Bill Graham Civic Auditorium.) The auditorium is located under a rounded glass building. The theater's above-ground lobby is 165 feet in diameter with 20-foot-high glass walls. (Seen below).

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Talking about pure research Steve Jobs Theater is great!

The theater's actual audience reveal to the public is on September 12, the same day the iPhone 8 or other new devices are supposedly unveiled. The theater sits next to the 'spaceship' with only 1,000 seats in total. (Which makes public events for Apple more exclusive than the last event that took place at the 7,000-seat Bill Graham Civic Auditorium.) The auditorium is located under a rounded glass building. The theater's above-ground lobby is 165 feet in diameter with 20-foot-high glass walls. (Seen below).

A quote from Apple CEO Tim Cook to Wired reads: "It's on a hill, at one of the highest points on this earth." "It felt like him." (Referring to Steve).

Here's a link to a video of the construction at Apple Park:

And another video of a drone tour of the park:

The theater seems like a very open and creative space, which is exactly what Steve would have wanted. Another fact to understand is that the theater has the largest freestanding carbon fiber roof ever made. I hope this answers your question!

DISCLAIMER: I have never met Steve Jobs in person.

I think it is important to say it, since I have read perhaps all the books on Steve Jobs and admire him since I was a child. And I had the privilege of meeting Steve Wozniak, as well as other important people in the industry.

All I can say about Steve Jobs is that he cannot be described in only one direction. While most people look at their traits and personality (which are complex in themselves), few people understand that those complex traits and personality also changed over time. The young Steve Jobs who founded Apple was very different at the most seaso

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DISCLAIMER: I have never met Steve Jobs in person.

I think it is important to say it, since I have read perhaps all the books on Steve Jobs and admire him since I was a child. And I had the privilege of meeting Steve Wozniak, as well as other important people in the industry.

All I can say about Steve Jobs is that he cannot be described in only one direction. While most people look at their traits and personality (which are complex in themselves), few people understand that those complex traits and personality also changed over time. The young Steve Jobs who founded Apple was very different from the more experienced Steve Jobs after the NeXT era, in many ways.

I'm following this question as I'm actually eager to read responses from people who REALLY knew Steve Jobs, the person, not Steve Jobs, the book character. However, I don't want to downplay the excellent work that many people have done writing biographies with this last sentence. I am so grateful that I was able to learn more from him thanks to all those amazing people who took the job to document his life.

Steve Jobs was amazing, people consider him a bad boss and often criticize him for being too harsh on employees.

Steve had his own way of working and the reason why people after 7 years of his death is the fact that he was ambitious. Steve Jobs inspired others to work

Steve didn't want others to be donkeys, but he wanted to make the most of others. It worked as a catalyst in many ways. Technologies like USB and HTML 5 were in their early stages and no one really wanted to change.

Here Steve defended them and did not use the above technologies, even though the technologies could jave deve

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Steve Jobs was amazing, people consider him a bad boss and often criticize him for being too harsh on employees.

Steve had his own way of working and the reason why people after 7 years of his death is the fact that he was ambitious. Steve Jobs inspired others to work

Steve didn't want others to be donkeys, but he wanted to make the most of others. It worked as a catalyst in many ways. Technologies like USB and HTML 5 were in their early stages and no one really wanted to change.

Here Steve defended them and did not use the older technologies, even though the technologies could have been developed anyway, but Steve had his ability to understand the capabilities of the new technologies.

This made him who we were and earned his respect.

Read somewhere.

Think of the most negative movie ever made about Steve Jobs. He was at least 10 times more idiotic than that.

Some highlights:

  1. Arrogant, he spoke harshly to the people around him.
  2. Ruined Wozniak many times.
  3. He denied his own daughter.
  4. People fired in small cases.
  5. He lost control over emotions. He was too controversial and unwieldy as a project leader.

The Modern Artist, although a real world changer, was a rather difficult type of person to handle in real life.

Ok, I guess you mean he's really like "in person" when you meet him. Well there's a fact where he says that he had been kept separate in a room by his boss at Atari because Steve had poor hygiene, basically he smelled fucking. And just eat fruit, WOW. He then returned to Apple after being fired by its board (in about 10 years). I can't really say how he will be, the guy basically didn't have a social life.

How would you expect me or most people to have more insight than Issacson? Steve Jobs was an intensely reserved person, not the type to open up in public. However, you can check Issacson's stated sources and his general reputation as a writer. But I doubt that even Issacson claims to have all the information about Jobs. Nobody did it ... except Jobs himself.

It is widely known that, for example, he treated Steve Wozniak quite badly at times, but Woz has no real grudge against him.

Treat the bio as a set of flashes for Jobs, the man, and evaluate those flashes instead of waiting

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How would you expect me or most people to have more insight than Issacson? Steve Jobs was an intensely reserved person, not the type to open up in public. However, you can check Issacson's stated sources and his general reputation as a writer. But I doubt that even Issacson claims to have all the information about Jobs. Nobody did it ... except Jobs himself.

It is widely known that, for example, he treated Steve Wozniak quite badly at times, but Woz has no real grudge against him.

Treat the bio as a set of glimpses of Jobs, the man, and evaluate those glimpses instead of waiting for the perfect summary that you and no one else will ever get.

Job's ideas and intellectual property were of his own design.

He leveraged the work of his associates, but was far ahead of most of them in recognizing a market need, designing packaging and communications to make products thrive, and convincing customers that they couldn't do without what he was selling.

His biography indicates that he was highly motivated and had few "friends."

One can get an idea of ​​his character, career, personality, work style, passion and personal life from Walter Isaacson's biography entitled 'Steve Jobs'. A great read!

I have read it and do not want to reveal spoilers.

This man was a horrible human being and too many people allowed him. I'm pretty sure he was a sociopath and fits the DSM V description. He was only nice to someone when he wanted something from them and was trying to manipulate them. His grandeur was unbelievable and on the contrary, Bill Gates, while not an angel, had never been the type to talk much about wanting to make a dent in history and was a hermit compared to Jobs in the 80s and 90s. ( Bill Gates gave a tech talk to kids about Nickolodeon back then. Jobs never showed any interest in kids or charity in his life, ever since

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This man was a horrible human being and too many people allowed him. I'm pretty sure he was a sociopath and fits the DSM V description. He was only nice to someone when he wanted something from them and was trying to manipulate them. His grandeur was unbelievable and on the contrary, Bill Gates, while not an angel, had never been the type to talk much about wanting to make a dent in history and was a hermit compared to Jobs in the 80s and 90s. ( Bill Gates gave a tech talk to kids about Nickolodeon back then. Jobs never showed any interest in kids or charity in his life, as it wouldn't just stand out for him to talk about his genius, as he did at conventions) .

He cared for no one but himself and frankly, he would tell anyone who knows where his remains are to unbutton his shorts and "fertilize" his grave. Justice would be delayed; Frankly, I'm amazed that no one at Apple finally broke up, gathered a group, slammed their office door behind them, and savagely beat him to the point where he was in a wheelchair, to the level of Stephen Hawking disabled. (I know the words are harsh, but he really was that evil. Let me prove it).

He would not acknowledge that his daughter was his until a DNA test and court order forced him to pay alimony. While his daughter and mother were impoverished, he was living the good life with expensive cars and everything he wanted with a snap of the fingers. He didn't even bother to see her. At one point she moved in with him, but he never held her or paid attention to her and when she asked for a goodnight kiss, they just laughed at her.

He claimed that those who worked for him "were not used to working in an environment of excellence," but the more important truth is that the environment he created at Apple was more like a ship full of kitchen slaves. People suffered from nervous breakdowns and heart attacks. According to the man himself, the world could be divided between the A levels and the bozos. Only one guy was welcome at Apple. If you had two teams where one wasn't delivering what you wanted, well, Incredibles Jack Jack had fewer tantrums and would crush his self-esteem to dust. He treated people more like robots than human beings. These people were rarely allowed to go HOME and making grown men cry didn't hurt Jobs. (I wouldn't be surprised if when one of his subordinates finally drank a bottle of aspirin,

His hypocrisy knew no bounds, considering that he STOLE the technology and ideas to start Apple from Xerox and the idiot never understood that he would have been nothing without Wozniak. People LIKED Woz's wizard. Steve even screwed Wozniak when he tricked him into designing a video game ... and Jobs took all the money. Wozniak did most of the groundwork for early Apple models, but STEVE took the credit. The shockingly horrible truth is that Steve Jobs, a man old enough to remember Bozo the Clown but not wise enough to realize that his engineers were probably laughing at him for continuing to use the archaic term, hadn't programmed anything since. early 1970s when he died. I did not know Python. Some form of C and its derivatives? JavaScript: why? You probably knew BASIC and ASCII. (For those who doubt me, think:

It would also mean that if he held to the same unrealistic standards as the ones he whipped like mules, he wouldn't have been able to get hired by Apple, as his qualifications would be pretty outdated. He stated that he only wanted excellence-BULLSHIT. He hired people far more qualified and talented than himself to do his dirty work, and he sucked their blood like a leech. Steve Jobs did not invent the iPod. Its engineers did. They never got credit.

This man deserves to be exposed for who he really was and presented as a warning of a cruel and abusive man who was allowed too much power and influence. He may have built a billion dollar empire, but he ruined many lives to get there. Lisa Brennan-Jobs deserved to have a caring father. Woz deserved to be hailed as a genius. Creators of all treats in the past 20 years must receive credit.

I worked at Apple and had to introduce Steve from time to time.

The first time we met, he entered the room, looked around, realized that I was new, approached me and asked (all at once): "Are you smart? Talking, am I going to waste my time? "

Rather than respond immediately, I decided to consider what, if anything, I was going to say. But since I didn't respond right away, Steve said, "Okay, let's get started." I wonder how that meeting would have gone if I had tried to say something instead ...

I introduced him to new technology several times. Then

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I worked at Apple and had to introduce Steve from time to time.

The first time we met, he entered the room, looked around, realized that I was new, approached me and asked (all at once): "Are you smart? Talking, am I going to waste my time? "

Rather than respond immediately, I decided to consider what, if anything, I was going to say. But since I didn't respond right away, Steve said, "Okay, let's get started." I wonder how that meeting would have gone if I had tried to say something instead ...

I introduced him to new technology several times. Sometimes it was my ideas, and other times it was the work my team did (My team always did an exceptional job. The people who reported to me were outstanding, and it was an honor to lead them).

We were in a meeting once, and Steve commented on how much he hated the 'wart' the external iSight camera was. I said, "I can make it internal." Steve asked how long it would take to get a prototype ready. My team worked on it (with many other hardware and software teams) and we developed a prototype. We had the demo set up and ready to go the next day. The only 'glitch' we hadn't anticipated was that one of the software guys updated the operating system on the machine AFTER we ran the demo and we felt it was ready. So the next day when we showed it to Steve, there was a color change in the video that we hadn't seen the day before. Asked why and the software engineer spoke up and said he had updated the operating system and probably changed the gamma setting. I think Steve was more amused and just said, "

Another time I was presenting a feature for Motion that I came up with. Real-time, green screen, high definition color keying software. Steve asked me at the presentation if another company could introduce this feature. I said, "Well, since I thought about it, I imagine someone else might come up with the idea, but they are unlikely to be able to figure it out in the same way that I can." (By the way, the 'peanut gallery' of vice presidents and directors behind Steve tried to tell me how to answer Steve's question. The problem was that half of them were nodding and the other half were shaking their heads.) He decided that since it was difficult to duplicate, instead of seeking a patent, we would keep it a trade secret. And as far as I know

Over the years, I (and my team members) made dozens of performances for Steve. My team was responsible for products like Mac Mini, Apple TV and the creation of many product prototypes ...

Steve was very smart. I was always amazed at how sharp he was and how quickly he could focus on what was important. I don't know of ANYONE who even comes close to how good it was to be able to do that.

Most of my presentations were for Jony Ive. Jony is a wonderful person to work with. One day my daughter joined me for lunch at Apple's "Cafe Macs" Steve and Jony were sitting nearby. My daughter was going to school for design illustration and asked if she could say hi to Jony. I took care of her and hoped to say hello and leave. But Jony was charming and chatted with my daughter for about 45 minutes. I noticed that Steve was getting more and more impatient, but also since they were talking about what good design did, I think Steve was being more tolerant. Finally, Steve suggested to Jony that they had to leave, and Jony concluded his discussion with my daughter. She was floating out of the cafe. Jony is a very kind and considerate person.

Andy Cunningham served as Steve Jobs' communications consultant, beginning in 1983, for the launch of the first Apple Macintosh computer, and remained throughout his departure from Apple and was reborn with his second company, NeXT.

He spoke about working with Steve Jobs at a PRSA event in Palo Alto, CA on Tuesday, October 17, 2017.

In Andy's words:

“He was so compelling with his vision. As soon as it came in, you were on. It was exhausting. They were testing you every minute of every day. But if he passed 80% of those tests, he could stay and if he didn't get 80%, he was out.

"The greatest joy of working

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Andy Cunningham served as Steve Jobs' communications consultant, beginning in 1983, for the launch of the first Apple Macintosh computer, and remained throughout his departure from Apple and was reborn with his second company, NeXT.

He spoke about working with Steve Jobs at a PRSA event in Palo Alto, CA on Tuesday, October 17, 2017.

In Andy's words:

“He was so compelling with his vision. As soon as it came in, you were on. It was exhausting. They were testing you every minute of every day. But if he passed 80% of those tests, he could stay and if he didn't get 80%, he was out.

“The greatest joy about working with Steve Jobs was that his agenda in life was clearly to change the world. He had no other interests. Money did not matter to him. Power didn't matter to him and women didn't matter to him. As a member of your team, it was very rewarding to work in that kind of environment. Even though it was challenging and difficult, it was very refreshing.

“The main thing I learned from Steve was this notion of everything that is high quality. It was about quality, regardless of whether it was the stair you were putting into a building, the color of the pixels on the screen, or the actual words on the paper ... it had to be exact and perfect. I learned a lot about the quality of him and about the environment. He really liked creating an environment where people wanted to work.

“If you ever visited the Macintosh building at Apple with the pirate flag, the offices were outside and in the middle was a piano, which he didn't play by the way. He put it there on purpose for people to meet, create, play and be creative.

“Under Steve Jobs, Apple was a missionary company. They wanted to change the fundamental behavior of human nature.

“Apple is going through a genetic change, not because of a conscious change, but because of what happened to Steve Jobs. With his passing, he handed over the keys to an amazing steward of the assets he created. Tim Cook has done a godly job of taking the assets they gave him and making them even more valuable and Apple an even bigger company. But what he has not been able to do is maintain that missionary status. So the company is moving from a missionary state to a more mechanical state. With that change, they will have to pay much more attention to their products. This happened recently with your batteries, something like that will not be tolerated in your new environment. We used to tolerate things like that from Apple because it was cool to buy Apple products. You felt that you were part of this movement to change the world. But if you are only going to buy another product,

Andy Cunningham, PR Pro who worked with Steve Jobs

Photo credit: Christopher Michel

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