What topcoder ranking do I need to attract top companies like Facebook or Google?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Jakob Mccray



What topcoder ranking do I need to attract top companies like Facebook or Google?

No one can really answer this except a recruiter, and even then I don't see any reason why all Google recruiters should have the same standards.

Personally, I guess if someone is at least yellow on TopCoder, they would probably be better at interviews than the 95% of applicants who actually get interviews. But does that guarantee that they will get an interview in the first place? Not necessarily, the application process can be very arbitrary.

Well, I'm going to disappoint everyone, I guess ... sorry.

I think they are quite confused about their hiring process ... there are people whose writing software is being used by Google and when they are interviewed they are rejected. I remember a red coder said that he solved each and every question in his interview with his great precision and insane speed (it's also red on the top coder (steady red)) ... but was rejected. There is a blogger who is a knowledgeable person and does a lot of activities ... well, I have read his blog. Write what you know. It was rejected by Google after

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Well, I'm going to disappoint everyone, I guess ... sorry.

I think they are quite confused about their hiring process ... there are people whose writing software is being used by Google and when they are interviewed they are rejected. I remember a red coder said that he solved each and every question in his interview with his great precision and insane speed (it's also red on the top coder (steady red)) ... but was rejected. There is a blogger who is a knowledgeable person and does a lot of activities ... well, I have read his blog. Write what you know. It was rejected by Google after all rounds of interviews. Well, there are thousands of people (maybe much bigger than that) who are on Google and who are much less rated by you or the guys mentioned above. A large number of people don't even participate in Topcoder ...

I never gave an interview to Google and I'm far from it ... well, I'm not that kind of genius. But what I think everyone should know at this point is: -

There is nothing that can make you suitable enough for Google ... Yes, you read that right. Being red on the topcoder is just such a thing.

To complete what I started I better say something else ... if you are a red coder or even a half div1 on Topcoder then you have found the beauty of solving problems and that is what we do in real life (maybe on a scale different) and it is sure to help a lot more.

For Google I would say top 10. For FB I have no idea, but I guess it would be similar to Google.

It depends.

Assuming you know the difference between a coder, a programmer, and a developer, I would say that a top100 coder is not always a good industrial developer.

  1. They don't necessarily know how to write code that lasts at least 5 years.
  2. They don't necessarily know how to write code that someone else understands. They generally don't comment on their default programming style or provide documentation. They also find it difficult to read their peers' code without judging and analyzing.
  3. They don't necessarily know how to design, design, and write more than 500 lines of code. In TC it is'
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It depends.

Assuming you know the difference between a coder, a programmer, and a developer, I would say that a top100 coder is not always a good industrial developer.

  1. They don't necessarily know how to write code that lasts at least 5 years.
  2. They don't necessarily know how to write code that someone else understands. They generally don't comment on their default programming style or provide documentation. They also find it difficult to read their peers' code without judging and analyzing.
  3. They don't necessarily know how to design, design, and write more than 500 lines of code. In TC it is just a function; in ACM ICPC it is just one file.
  4. They don't necessarily know a lot about using external libraries or open source tools when it comes to finding cost-effective and reliable solutions to industrial problems. For the most part, they prefer to write it themselves from scratch rather than relying on others.
  5. They have deep performance concerns in mind by default, as fast execution is always a factor in most programming challenges. Fast sometimes means making your code super dirty and dirty so that it runs 10% faster and is ACCEPTED, not an algorithmic improvement. So if "maintainability" is more of a concern for a team of 100+ developers working remotely on an MM line size code base, things like What are some cool manipulation tricks / tricks? bits? they are not really useful.
  6. Not all problems in the industry are solved 10 in 5 hours. You will have days, weeks, or months to do your job.
  7. Not all top100 encoders are team players. Even ACM-ICPC teams are sometimes 3-tank solving individually. (And win!) Most of the good guys are introverts (10 years of experience dealing with them says so) and it's not easy for them to have efficient communication and explain their thoughts in a non-technical way. It's going to be a bigger problem in the industry when you have to explain your solution to a PM with no IT experience who only cares about time / money efficiency.
  8. They will get bored if you don't feed them challenging problems often. And that doesn't always happen in life.
  9. If the company itself is not among the 100 most popular companies in the valley, it will be very difficult for them to maintain the loyalty of these candidates.

That said, not everyone needs them. And it's a risk to hire someone like that if you don't have problems that only they can solve!

The good news is that big companies always have the money, the brand, the benefits, the time, and everything they need to take this risk and hire them. This is why if you are in the TC Top 100 or an ACM ICPC World Finalist, you will most likely be contacted by Google or FB recruiters frequently. And yes, after having a gold seal from one of these great brands on your resume as proof of industrial experience, you will receive even more opportunities down the road.

However, for the OP: if you are not there yet, if you are not passionate about problem solving just because of the feeling you get every time you see "Yes, AC!", And if your goal is to simply get hired for good or best companies, this path is one of the worst to take. Go learn Software development.

Edit: And from some perspectives it sucks. Aideen NasiriShargh's answer to What Sucks About Competitive Programming? Why is it better to do real world programming?

For the past 18 years, I have been involved in the growth of various engineering organizations at SGI, NetApp, Zynga. I have hired several hundred, if not thousands, of people throughout my career. I have been actively involved in the college recruitment process and strategy.

I have mentored many, many young engineers throughout my career. Several of whom have done important careers on their own.

Until I discovered Quora, I had no idea that competitive programming existed.

Let me note that competitive programming is * fundamentally * opposite of what professional programming is all about.

We are not

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For the past 18 years, I have been involved in the growth of various engineering organizations at SGI, NetApp, Zynga. I have hired several hundred, if not thousands, of people throughout my career. I have been actively involved in the college recruitment process and strategy.

I have mentored many, many young engineers throughout my career. Several of whom have done important careers on their own.

Until I discovered Quora, I had no idea that competitive programming existed.

Let me note that competitive programming is * fundamentally * opposite of what professional programming is all about.

We are not * competing * we are not * trying to solve the problem * what we are doing is collaborating and trying to create the most value for the customer. There is no "win" or "lose" more than delighting the customer.

What skills are relevant to landing a great job at a great company:

  • Being able to quickly solve a problem under time pressure is not an interesting or relevant skill.
  • Being able to write "smart" code is not valuable.
  • Being able to read large amounts of code is valuable.
  • Being able to write clear code is valuable.
  • Being able to work with other people is valuable.
  • It is valuable to be able to think carefully without being under limited time pressure.
  • Being able to work on problems that are ambiguous and being able to define a correct solution when there is no correct solution is valuable.
  • Being able to think about the value proposition for the customer is valuable.
  • It is valuable to have a broad and in-depth knowledge of computer systems and technologies.

Competitive programming is not an exclusive indicator of any of this. And to be honest, it is not clear if it is an indicator. Having never looked for competing programming people and having found people with the skills I am looking for, I can confidently state that competitive programming is unnecessary.

You want to work in a large company to develop the skills I spoke about. Experienced technologists will look for those skills.

If you want to do competitive programming because it's fun, do it.

Anonymous Tracking

Obviously, there is a lot of passion for competitive programming.

The original question was whether it is necessary to be hired.

And some of the responses feel compelled to argue that there is value. Some anonymous person felt compelled to point out that algorithms are a key part of scaling and that competitive programming is essential to learning about algorithms.

The guys who figured out how to scale Zynga to over 300 million MAUs and 60 million DAUs, who had the biggest FB game of all time, didn't spend their time doing competitive programming.

My claim is that competitive programming is not necessary to get hired.

Let me repeat that it is not.

And it has never been a decision criterion in 18 years of hiring a lot of people.

And since it is not necessary and has never been a decision criterion, then I think it is useless.

You are more likely to impress someone who is hiring with a favorite project on GitHub that other people use.

As engineers, we are more impressed with the things that are built and that other people use than with any competition that can win.

We spend more time searching for people on GitHub to hire than we do looking for lists of competitive programming winners.

If you want to add value to your resume, please do so. Go build something on GitHub.

And you know what you will be better at.

But what can I do?

After reading my answer, I realized that what I had done was only answer part of the question, the one related to competitive programming, not the "what else can I do"?

Stay away from jobs like college admissions

First, let me note that there are many great companies in the valley. In college I used to think, partly because that's how we think about college admissions, that I had to go to the best company and that if I didn't it would be a disaster. The reality is that, unlike universities where there is a strict classification, companies are much more fluid.

Great companies come and go and come and go.

Just to make it concrete:

In 2006, Facebook felt like one more social network for university students. In 2000, Google was just another search company. In 1996 Yahoo was a website at akebono.stanford.edu. In 1997 NetApp was a roaster company. In 2008, Zynga was a stupid poker company.

Approaching the job search like a dating game

The key to finding your first job or any other is finding a manager you like. It turns out that the biggest determinant of your future success is you, and the second biggest is your manager. Have a good manager who creates opportunities, then the sky is the limit. If you have a bad manager, you will be looking for a new job very quickly. Have a good manager who can help you grow, then you will grow.

The second key is the team. You don't have to want to hang out with your coworkers after work, but you have to like them. They should feel like people you trust, people you can learn from, people who can help you grow. Most importantly, they should feel like a team. You don't want to join a group of people who don't like each other.

The third key is growth. Sheryl Sandberg said it best: go to growth. Always look for opportunities where there is growth. When things get bigger, there are always more opportunities to learn, to expand your skills, to be promoted. Always look for a company that is about to grow very fast. And in most cases they are not the FB or Google of the world, but the ones that are going to be that type of company.

So what do I do, Kostadis?

There are many things on Quora about being hired at a great company. There is a lot on the internet.

Getting hired is a dating game. The work has to be there. The opportunity has to be there. Not getting a job does not reflect on you, necessarily, it may be the wrong time.

I wrote a pretty good answer to this question here:

Kostadis Roussos' answer to How can you become a good enough programmer to work at a top company in Silicon Valley? What kinds of things do you need to know at the very least? Any other tips to get there?

Go read that. And read some of the other answers too ...

Intelligence above average for sure!

Joking aside, here's a list of 11 qualities Google looks for in its interns (potential employees), according to a Business Insider article:

  1. Google doesn't look for experts.

"We would rather hire smart and curious people than people who are deep and insightful experts in one area or another."

2. Google wants people with a high "cognitive ability."

"If you hire someone who is bright, curious and who can learn, they are more likely to come up with a new solution that the world has not seen before."

3. Google searches for people with "guts."

A senior executive spoke to the Times

Keep reading

Intelligence above average for sure!

Joking aside, here's a list of 11 qualities Google looks for in its interns (potential employees), according to a Business Insider article:

  1. Google doesn't look for experts.

"We would rather hire smart and curious people than people who are deep and insightful experts in one area or another."

2. Google wants people with a high "cognitive ability."

"If you hire someone who is bright, curious and who can learn, they are more likely to come up with a new solution that the world has not seen before."

3. Google searches for people with "guts."

A top executive spoke to the Times about a time he was on campus talking to a dual major in computer science and math. The student was thinking of quitting computer science; it was too difficult.

"I told that student that he was much better off being a B student in computer science than an A + student in English,"

4. Google wants to know if candidates can tackle difficult projects.

5. Google wants candidates with analytical skills.

"Analytical training gives you a skill set that sets you apart from most people in the job market."

6. Google expects people to meet ridiculously high standards.

"We don't compromise our hiring bar, ever." Because of this, job postings stay open longer on Google than you'd expect, he says: They have to kiss a lot of frogs before they find The One.

7. But Google doesn't care about GPAs.

GPAs and test scores do not correlate with success in the company.

8. Google wants to know how much candidates have achieved compared to their peers.

For example, many people would simply write, "I wrote editorials for The New York Times." But a featured resume could be more specific about your accomplishments and how you stack up against others. A better example: "50 opinion pieces were published compared to the average of 6 for most opinion piece writers as a result of providing deep insight into the next area over three years."

9. Google looks for employees who know when to step up and take a leadership role.

"What we care about is, when we are faced with a problem and you are a member of a team, at the right time, do you step in and lead? And equally critically, step back and stop leading, leave someone More? Because the key to being an effective leader in this environment is that you have to be willing to give up power. "

10. Google wants to see people take ownership of projects.

With that sense of ownership, you will feel responsible for the fate of a project, preparing you to solve any problem. But it should also differ when other people have better ideas: "Your ultimate goal is what we can do together to solve the problem. I have contributed my piece and then take a step back."

11. Google also wants to see humility.

You need "intellectual humility" to be successful on Google. "Without humility, you cannot learn." This is a common problem among well-educated people; Graduates of elite business schools tend to stabilize. Instead of having the opportunity to learn, they blame others.

Among the top tier companies that were hiring this year, I applied to few, and for the most part, the interviews were easy for me due to my strength in competitive scheduling. However, whether I was actually hired has no correlation with that.

  • First, I received referrals from several seniors and friends because they knew I was good at algorithms and data structures. Also, I was able to fill a space on my resume with compliments from the contest, which made for a solid resume.
  • If you see the kinds of problems that good sports programming competitions have and compare them to the interview questions,
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Among the top tier companies that were hiring this year, I applied to few, and for the most part, the interviews were easy for me due to my strength in competitive scheduling. However, whether I was actually hired has no correlation with that.

  • First, I received referrals from several seniors and friends because they knew I was good at algorithms and data structures. Also, I was able to fill a space on my resume with compliments from the contest, which made for a solid resume.
  • If you look at the kinds of problems that good sports programming competitions have and compare them to interview questions, you will see that interview problems are the most common problems that no one will bring up in a contest.
  • However, some companies have given me very good problems and it was fun to solve them. Once again, being good at these contests ensured that I had that kind of algorithmic thinking and thought process necessary to find a solution or the correct approach to the problem.
  • Over time, my programming skills have improved considerably. Now when I look back at my previous presentations, I can clearly see how I could have avoided all that spaghetti code, how I can restructure the code to make it more readable. Now I can write code with less frequent and logical errors. I have a good command of C ++, knowing the complexities and characteristics of the language.
  • I have developed the ability to express my solutions and thought process to the interviewer, which I gained through various discussions I had with my teammates and friends while practicing and solving contests.
  • Sometimes it is a good topic of conversation in an interview :)

Of course there are some drawbacks too, like the interviewer might judge you and think you don't have good experience in real world software development and real world problem solving, or you may have a complicated approach at times. than required for a problem. from your previous experience in coding contests.

Follow my space exploration with Lalit Kundu for more such content.

Hello there,

Google has authenticated that they use almost 200 ranking signals in their algorithm. But still, they were never openly listed again. While this info graphic is by no means official. Add the genuine information we have about how Google ranks pages and websites.

Please check Google ranking factor one by one and if anyone needs the definition to understand it, I will provide it by comment. because this answer is already too long.

Domain factors:

  • Domain age
  • The keyword appears in the top-level domain
  • Duration of domain registration
  • Keyword in subdomain name
  • Domain history
  • Exact match domain
  • Private public
Keep reading

Hello there,

Google has authenticated that they use almost 200 ranking signals in their algorithm. But still, they were never openly listed again. While this info graphic is by no means official. Add the genuine information we have about how Google ranks pages and websites.

Please check Google ranking factor one by one and if anyone needs the definition to understand it, I will provide it by comment. because this answer is already too long.

Domain factors:

  • Domain age
  • The keyword appears in the top-level domain
  • Duration of domain registration
  • Keyword in subdomain name
  • Domain history
  • Exact match domain
  • Whois public private
  • Whois owner penalized
  • Country TLD Extension

Page level factors:

  • Keyword in title tag
  • The title tag begins with a keyword
  • Keyword in description tag
  • The keyword appears in the H1 tag
  • The keyword is the most used phrase in the document.
  • Length of content
  • Keyword density
  • Latent Semantic Indexing in Content (LSI) Keywords
  • LSI keywords in title and description tags
  • Page loading speed via html
  • Duplicate content
  • Rel = conical
  • Page loading speed through Chrome
  • Image optimization
  • Current content updates
  • Magnitude of content updates
  • Historical updates page updates
  • Keyword performance
  • Keyword in H2, H3 tags
  • Keyword order
  • Outbound link quality
  • Outbound link topic
  • Grammar and orthography
  • Distributed content
  • Helpful supplemental content
  • Number of outbound links
  • Multimedia
  • Number of internal links pointing to the page
  • Quality of the internal links that point to the page
  • Broken links
  • Reading level
  • Affiliate Links
  • HTML error / WC3 validation
  • Page hosts domain authority
  • Page rank of the page
  • URL length
  • URL path
  • Human editors
  • Page Category
  • Wordpress Tags
  • Keyword in URL
  • URL string
  • References and sources
  • Bullets and numbered lists
  • Page priority on the sitemap
  • Too many outbound links
  • Number of other keywords ranked on the page
  • Page age
  • User friendly design
  • Parked domains

Site-level factors:

  • Content provides unique insight and value
  • Contact us page
  • Domain trust / trustrank
  • Site architecture
  • Site updates
  • Number of pages
  • Sitemap present
  • Site uptime
  • Server location
  • SSL certificate (e-commerce sites)
  • Terms of service and privacy pages
  • Duplicate content on the site
  • Breadcrumb navigation
  • Optimized for mobile
  • Youtube
  • Site usability
  • Google Analytics user and Google webmaster tools
  • User reviews / site reputation

Backlink factors:

  • Linking the domain age
  • Of linking root domains
  • From independent class C IPS links
  • From link pages
  • Alternative tag (for image links)
  • Links from .edu or .gov domains
  • Link page PR
  • Binding domain authority
  • Competitor links
  • Referral page social actions
  • Bad neighborhood links
  • Guest posts
  • Links to home-page domain that page site on
  • No-follow links
  • Diversity of link types
  • Contexutual links
  • "Sponsored links" or other words around link
  • Excessive 301 redirects to page
  • Backlink anchor text
  • Internal link anchor text
  • Link title attribution
  • Country TLD of referring domain
  • Link location in content
  • Link location on page
  • Linking domain relevancy
  • Page level relevancy
  • Text around link sentiment
  • Keyword in title
  • Positive link velocity
  • Negative link velocity
  • Links from "HUB" pages
  • Link from authority sites
  • Linked to as wikipedia source
  • Co-occurrences
  • Backlink age
  • Links from real sites v/s splogs
  • Natural link profile
  • Reciprocal links
  • User generated content links
  • Links from 301
  • Schema.org micro-formats
  • Yahoo ! directory listed
  • Number of outbound links on-page
  • Forum profile links
  • Word count of linking quality linking
  • Quality of linking content
  • Site-wide links

User interaction:

  • Organic click through rate for a keyword
  • Organic CTR for all keywords
  • Bounce rate
  • Direct traffic
  • Repeat traffic
  • Blocked sites
  • Chrome bookmarks
  • Google toolbar data
  • Number of comments
  • Time on site
  • Special Algorithm Rules:
  • Query deserves freshness
  • Query deserve diversity
  • User browsing history
  • User search history
  • GEO targeting
  • Safe search
  • Google+ circlesDMCA Complaints
  • Domain diversity
  • Transational searches
  • Local searches
  • Google news box
  • Big brand preference
  • Shopping results
  • Image results
  • Single site result for brands

Social signals:

  • Number of tweets
  • Authority of twitter users accounts
  • Number of facebook likes
  • Facebook shares
  • Authority of facebook user accounts
  • Pinterest pins
  • Votes on social sharing sites
  • Number of google+1's
  • Authority of Google user accounts
  • Verified google+ authorship
  • Social signal relevancy
  • Site level social signals

Brand Signals:

  • Brand name anchor text
  • Branded searches
  • Site has facebook page and likes
  • Site has twitter profiles with followers
  • Official linkedin campany page
  • Employees listed at linkedin
  • Legitimacy of social media accounts
  • Brand mentions on NEWS sites
  • Co-citations
  • Number of RSS subscribers
  • Bricks and mortar location with google local listing
  • Website is tax paying business

On-page webspam factors:

  • Panda penalty
  • Links to bad neighborhoods
  • Redirects
  • Popular or distracting ads
  • Site over-optiization
  • Page over optimization
  • Ads above the fold
  • Hiding affiliate links
  • Affiliate sites
  • Autogenerated content
  • Excess pagerank sculpting
  • IP address flagged as spam
  • Meta tag spamming

Off-page webspam factors:

  • Unnatural influx of links
  • Penguin penalty
  • Link profile with high % of low quality links
  • Linking domain relevancy
  • Unnatural links warning
  • Links from the same class C IP
  • "Poison" anchor text
  • Manual penalty
  • Selling links
  • Google Sandbox
  • Google dance
  • Disallow tools

I also thoroughly learned each factor from the SEJ, SEL, and Google webmaster guidelines.

Thanks…

AMIT FROG

Let me introduce you to two scenarios when applying for a job and how much knowledge of data structures and algorithms matters in regards to these two scenarios.

  1. One is that you are fresh out of college. You may have an internship experience of 2-3 months and nothing more.
  2. The second scenario is where you are applying for a position that requires a minimum of X years of experience.


When companies hire new employees, they don't have much to evaluate them on except for their thinking skills and problem-solving skills. The best way to test this (and most companies d

Keep reading

Let me introduce you to two scenarios when applying for a job and how much knowledge of data structures and algorithms matters in regards to these two scenarios.

  1. One is that you are fresh out of college. You may have an internship experience of 2-3 months and nothing more.
  2. The second scenario is where you are applying for a position that requires a minimum of X years of experience.


When the companies are recruiting freshers, they don't have much to assess them on except for their thinking ability and problem solving skills. The best way to test this (and most companies do seem to stick to this) is by testing the candidate's knowledge about data structures and algorithms and problem solving skills. Though in actual projects in companies you might never ever be required to code a freaking Segment Tree or even a Linked list for that matter. But the norm is that if these skills are good enough, then you will probably even excel at work in the company.

So as far as freshers are concerned

  • A strong knowledge of data structures and algorithms.
  • Active participation in Online competitions.
  • Having great ranks on well known Online Judges like Topcoder and SPOJ etc. is necessary.


I wouldn't say that if someone is not active on OJs and if someone does not have a strong grasp over data structures and algorithms, then he / she cannot secure their dream job. I have seen so many students who hate competitions like this per say, but they are excellent in web designing and even advanced subjects like Machine Learning and this is something that jet propels them forward in the race.

In case you are applying for a position that does require a certain set of skills and that requires a certain minimum experience from you, then these things won't matter a lot. I mean after college, 90% of competitive programmers actually leave competitive programming and everybody has their own valid reasons. Only a select few keep their passion alive and continue coding, not to get yet another and better job but because they love it. For the love of sport. So in this scenario what will matter the most is the projects you have done at your previous companies or as a freelancer. Do you have what it takes to lead a small team if the need be. Do you have a strong grasp of all the tech stack required for effectively working under the role of ABC which can be anything :- From Senior Developer to Director of Engineering to even CTO of the company. Here instead of your algorithmic skills what will matter the most is the experience you bring to the table. The problems you will face here are practical problems.

Practical app level problems are very different from the ones we solve on online judges. The problems we encounter in our job don't always have a CORRECT solution per say. You have to optimise, optimise and optimise as much as you can till a better technology comes up and you upgrade. You will never find a solution that will work in all the cases. So this experience is what is needed in the second scenario.

In case you are still a fresher, work hard to improve and strengthen your problem solving skills and devour CLRS as much as possible. That is the Bible of data structures and algorithms. Practice, Practice and only Practice.

In case you have been in the industry for some time now, then don't pay much attention to this. Instead work on building your skills that might be needed for your job switch.

Hope this helps. :)

In my third year in college, I received internship offers from Facebook, Microsoft, and Google. Considering my profile at the time, I think the only reason they wanted me was my experience in contests. My team was second in the ACM ICPC regional contest the year before, and I was yellow at TopCoder, purple at Codeforces.

How do I achieve this? There are several steps.

  1. In the round of documents, I included the performance of my contests in my resume and highlighted that I want to work in algorithm. Typically for internships this would lead you to the interview round.
  2. In the rounds of interviews, answer the questions
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In my third year in college, I received internship offers from Facebook, Microsoft, and Google. Considering my profile at the time, I think the only reason they wanted me was my experience in contests. My team was second in the ACM ICPC regional contest the year before, and I was yellow at TopCoder, purple at Codeforces.

How do I achieve this? There are several steps.

  1. In the round of documents, I included the performance of my contests in my resume and highlighted that I want to work in algorithm. Typically for internships this would lead you to the interview round.
  2. At the interview rounds, answer the questions as flawlessly and quickly as you can. These questions are usually fairly easy if you have any background in programming contests. Don't do anything like "First give a slow algorithm, and pretend as if you were trying to optimize it...", as taught at Hacking a Google Interview. IMO, it's quite dishonest and most interviewers would recognize that.
  3. If you answer all the questions very fast, you may ask for more questions. In case the interviewer did not prepare more, it's your responsibility to come up with questions for him or her. To do so, it is important to do some research about your interviewer beforehand. Stalk their Facebook, LinkedIn, whatever, for their background, school, and interest and prepare about 5 thoughtful questions about them and their team. You would be extremely lucky if your interviewer is involved in programing contest. It was once my case, where I just asked how my contest experience can fit into his team's work.

Good luck!

I know a lot of people who have bagged jobs at Google with little competitive programming experience (including myself). Absolute zero experience with competitive programming is rare but still there.

Amazon / Microsoft: I know people with absolutely no experience in competitive programming who get hired.

Let me tell you this: In any company, competitive scheduling performance can help you indirectly only by strengthening your fundamentals. You will learn many data structures and algorithms due to competitive programming that will help you solve problems efficiently during interviews. How

Keep reading

I know many people who have landed jobs at Google with little experience in competitive programming (including myself). Absolute zero experience with competitive programming is rare, but it's still there.

Amazon / Microsoft: I know people with absolutely no experience in competitive programming who get hired.

Let me tell you this - At any company competitive programming performance may indirectly help you only by making you fundamentals stronger. You will learn a lot of data structures and algorithms due to competitive programming which will help you solve problems efficiently during interviews. However it is still possible to learn those things in ways other than competitive programming.

LinkedList, Stack, Queues, Binary Search Trees, Heaps, Tries, Basic Graphs, Arrays - If you are good with these data structures you can indeed land a job in any of these companies. You should do some interview specific preparation from:

GeeksforGeeks | A computer science portal for geeks
Coding Interview preparation made easy,
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Infact most questions are usually ad hoc - involving simple linear list of integers and performing some basic operations to it - sorting, searching, etc.

Problem Solving Ability is the most important thing. The art of breaking down an unknown problem into a problem whose solution is already known to us. The only way you will get better at it is by practicing a lot. There is no way you can get a job without hard work.

Edit:
In a totally different Answer, someone (I don't remember who) told that there only ~15k active participants on CodeForces while there are ~30k Google employees world wide. It is safe to assume that most of them are not competitive programmers.

Google APAC Test

  • Target Audience - Students studying in their final year of computer science engineering or related areas
  • Objective: shortlist students for various job opportunities on Google
  • Location: Asia Pacific. India
  • Content: competitive programming from easy to medium-difficult
  • Duration - 2.5 hours
  • Evaluation: automatically judged by the system
  • Calendar: 4 to 5 tests that take place from July to November every year. Registrations start 2-3 weeks before the first round. In 2016, the first round took place on July 10, 2016. All rounds take place on Sunday.
  • Pros: Top performers may receive a job offer from Google (after
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Google APAC Test

  • Target audience: students who are in the last year of computer engineering or related areas.
  • Objective: shortlist students for various job opportunities on Google
  • Location: Asia Pacific. India
  • Content: competitive programming from easy to medium-difficult
  • Duration - 2.5 hours
  • Evaluation: automatically judged by the system
  • Calendar: 4 to 5 tests that take place from July to November every year. Registrations start 2-3 weeks before the first round. In 2016, the first round took place on July 10, 2016. All rounds take place on Sunday.
  • Ventajas: las personas con mejor desempeño pueden obtener una oferta de trabajo de Google (después de las entrevistas, por supuesto)

Verano de código de Google

  • Público objetivo: estudiantes (mayores de 18 años) que desean contribuir a proyectos de código abierto durante el verano.
  • Objetivo: fomentar el desarrollo de código abierto
  • Location - Work from Home. International (except some countries)
  • Content - Real-life problems and large codebases usually maintained using a version control system
  • Duration - 12 weeks
  • Evaluation - Manually reviewed by mentors on a regular basis. 2 official reviews are submitted.
  • Schedule - Application for students starts in mid-February. Results are out by last week of April. Coding Period starts from mid May to mid August.
  • Perks - $5500 to all candidates who successfully completes the program. Some students have reported that they received an invitation for an internship at Google following their participation in Summer of Code.

Google Code Jam

  • Target Audience - Professionals and Students
  • Objective - Identifying top engineering talent and potential recruitment
  • Location - First few rounds are online. Finals are organized on-site
  • Content - Medium to Hard programming problems related to DS and Algos. One of the toughest programming contest
  • Duration - Varies from 3hrs to 24hrs depending on round
  • Evaluation - Automatically judged
  • Schedule - Qualification to Final Round spans from April to August every year
  • Perks - $15,000 grand prize for winners. Lot of swag and interview invitation for top performers.

Google Employees including interns are not allowed to participate in any of these programs. The selection procedure is quite standardized and there is hardly any scope for any mistake / bias. Everything is based on merit.

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