What to do and what not to do when you are in an interview?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Channing Christensen



What to do and what not to do when you are in an interview?

Things to do:
-Looks decent. The interviewer likes decent people.

-Enter the room with permission. Do not rush.

-Greet the interviewer cordially with firm handshakes. (Don't crush their hands)

-Always come prepared. Search Google about the company and learn more about it.

-Speak fluently in a soft, reassuring voice. It's okay to be a little nervous. :-)

-You don't need to know the answer to all the questions I ask you.

-Show interest in what he is saying / asking you. He will also have a similar interest in you ... :-)

-Smile throughout the interview. Smiles are contagious, the interviewer will also start to smile :-)

-After the interview is over, thank him for his time (with a handshake), collect your files, and come out like a champ.


Things not to do:
-Don't act scared or overconfident. Show some humility

-While sitting, do not cross your legs and always keep your hands on the table.

-Do not yell or speak loudly. It is a deciding factor.

-Don't shake your legs, make strange noises or expressions during the interview. ACT PROFESSIONAL!

-Don't disrespect the interviewer with sarcastic jokes. Never!

-Do not obscure the environment with negative answers. Always respond in a positive tone.

-Once the interview is over, don't rush! Take your time...

NOTE: Do not make your interviewer angry in any way, you may complain to your manager and they may not allow you to sit in any other interview.

That's it ... if your interview is coming up, GOOD LUCK! And all the best!

Once they say we'll call you, the door has been opened for you to follow up. Whether it's a good way to knock him off or not, seize the opportunity. The best way is during the interview when they say, reply with, I look forward to it. When should I put that on my agenda? Then wait a period of time. Whether it is specific or not (or., In 2 weeks or in 2-3 weeks). Then acknowledge it and go to that day. Where it is given as a rank, the later date assumes. Reiterate the specific date, "So, should I expect to hear from you by the day / month at the latest?" , then let them affirm or correct. OR

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Once they say we'll call you, the door has been opened for you to follow up. Whether it's a good way to knock him off or not, seize the opportunity. The best way is during the interview when they say, reply with, I look forward to it. When should I put that on my agenda? Then wait a period of time. Whether it is specific or not (or., In 2 weeks or in 2-3 weeks). Then acknowledge it and go to that day. Where it is given as a rank, the later date assumes. Reiterate the specific date, "So, should I expect to hear from you by the day / month at the latest?" , then let them affirm or correct. Once you have it, continue by saying, “I understand that you are busy with this recruitment and with your regular duties. In case I don't hear from you by then, I will contact you on (use next business day). What time is the best time to contact you so I can put a reminder on my schedule? ”. Have your schedule to show that you really want to remind him. If they say it's not necessary, just be polite and say you do it as a matter of managing your personal schedule and keeping track of your opportunities. If you don't already have a direct line to reach them, ask for one. If they are serious with you, then it won't be a problem. If they are not and have tried this touch to ignore it, they will accept it to avoid embarrassment. Either way, you've created a means to finish this, as well as an opportunity to demonstrate some key self-management skills. It is a victory for you. just be polite and say you do it as a matter of managing your personal schedule and keeping track of your opportunities. If you don't already have a direct line to reach them, ask for one. If they are serious with you, then it won't be a problem. If they are not and have tried this touch to ignore it, they will accept it to avoid embarrassment. Either way, you've created a means to finish this, as well as an opportunity to demonstrate some key self-management skills. It is a victory for you. just be polite and say you do it as a matter of managing your personal schedule and keeping track of your opportunities. If you don't already have a direct line to reach them, ask for one. If they are serious with you, then it won't be a problem. If they are not and have tried this touch to ignore it, They will accept it to avoid embarrassment. Either way, you've created a means to finish this, as well as an opportunity to demonstrate some key self-management skills. It is a victory for you. plus the opportunity to demonstrate some key self-management skills. It is a victory for you. plus the opportunity to demonstrate some key self-management skills. It is a victory for you.

In this case, you will have to play it by ear. If you were given a vague time period, wait until the day after that period and then call. Let the person know that you are following up on your interview and that they just need to know your decision so they can proceed accordingly. I have to manage my time to its best use. It will allow me to move in the right direction. If they say there is no decision, give them more time or whatever, use the follow-up approach above.

What you want is to gain a degree of control over the job search process. By keeping track with specific dates and times, you can do just that. Never end an interview without obtaining permission to follow up.

I would like to share the things that might be inappropriate in case you share them with your boss. Below are some points to the best of my knowledge and observation.

I do not have information

The first rule is that you should never tell your boss that you have no idea or that you don't know if your boss asks you something. The boss or employer generally has an opinion of the employees they trust, who will share the answer or find the solution to the concern. The fact of the matter is that even if you have no idea about something, you will check and come back on the subject. This resp

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I would like to share the things that might be inappropriate in case you share them with your boss. Below are some points to the best of my knowledge and observation.

I do not have information

The first rule is that you should never tell your boss that you have no idea or that you don't know if your boss asks you something. The boss or employer generally has an opinion of the employees they trust, who will share the answer or find the solution to the concern. The fact of the matter is that even if you have no idea about something, you will check and come back on the subject. This answer will give your boss an assurance that you will be an asset to the company and look forward to a long-term partnership.

Do not share operating practices from your previous job.

Do not share the operating practices of your previous job compared to your current company. In case you share this immediate boss and colleagues, they may feel that you are rigid and not flexible to adapt to the new environment. If you have any observations, bring them just as an observation point or as a way to improve things.

I'm already over busy

Never tell your boss that you are already busy and could not complete a task due to lack of time. In this way, its value will decrease. This will give your boss an idea that you are not capable of doing something or of what you are not. Even if you are very busy, try to find some time to finish your homework.

Don't give critical comments

We all face failures and successes, the same goes for a boss and an organization as well. Bosses are undoubtedly experienced and experts in their fields, however they may face failure. In any circumstance, you should not make disparaging remarks. A critical view or observation can be given before the execution of an event, but not after the event has occurred, that will be treated negatively.

Be honest and active first! Many of us react to the situation and to other people. That is, as soon as you arrive at your job interview, you will be the one to react to your interviewer or the situation present there.

Instead, be the actor and make sure you're the first to come up with a plan.

  • Hello Mr./Mrs. ___ Today I will be a little late about 15 minutes. I'm not going to apologize, I just made the mistake of not leaving early enough to calculate this traffic. I'll be there as soon as humanly possible.

In this example, you are the actor who takes responsibility for the actions, which

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Be honest and active first! Many of us react to the situation and to other people. That is, as soon as you arrive at your job interview, you will be the one to react to your interviewer or the situation present there.

Instead, be the actor and make sure you're the first to come up with a plan.

  • Hello Mr./Mrs. ___ Today I will be a little late about 15 minutes. I'm not going to apologize, I just made the mistake of not leaving early enough to calculate this traffic. I'll be there as soon as humanly possible.

In this example, you are the actor who takes responsibility for the actions, which is a great first step. What you should not here is that making excuses is not going to help. Be honest and take responsibility. Even if you were in a car accident, they will still be waiting for you. Therefore, you must take responsibility for your meetings and cancel or reschedule them. An excuse is not going to help you in any way.


However, what would be even better is if you walk in with the assumption that they want to talk to you!

  • Hello Mr./Mrs .___ Today I will be a little late about 15 minutes. I'm not going to apologize, please sit back, I'll be there. I guarantee that your search for a new hire will be over in the next 30 minutes!

As you can see, here you are being very presumptuous and sounding very arrogant. The idea is good, but the execution on the part of this person is very poor, as they seem arrogant more than anything else.

That said, we're only missing one ingredient for the perfect way to handle being late for a job interview: attitude.


When you take being late incredibly seriously, and think that it is a horrible thing that should not happen under any circumstances, you will act correspondingly shy and your interviewers will adopt this feeling themselves.

Instead, keep in mind that it happens to everyone, and it's just plain unfortunate. Smile and laugh and show your interviewer that it's no big deal.

  • Hello Mr./Mrs. ___ Haha… this is a bit awkward. I have to tell you, I'll be a little late for our job interview. I apologize for taking more time from my mistakes. (smile) Haha… But look, I really think I'm very qualified for this job and I would still love to take this opportunity today. Thank you very much and see you in a bit!

This is the best you can do, but it largely depends on two factors:

  1. Your own confidence. If you are not comfortable and confident doing this, they will notice and put you to the test. Say no, or things that will mislead you. In those cases, you must maintain your attitude and not waver in positivity.
  2. Your ability to smile during the call. This will make a difference. As soon as you call them, start smiling and only stop after the call ends. You'll sound different, you'll be more relaxed, and your interviewer will probably be able to tell that you're smiling ... even on the phone.

A good attitude when calling them is your best bet so that they see you as something small.


In summary, these are the things you need to do:

  1. Take charge. Act like you're in control of your life and take responsibility. Call them, make no excuses and be totally safe and honest.
  2. Act like they already like you. This is for the brave and confident people, as this assumption can backfire if you can't back it up. But if so, it will be very rewarding.
  3. Have a positive attitude. People want employees who are able to solve problems with ease. This is your first test, so to speak. So ... or you can't fix it, you don't even call and you're totally stunned. Or is he calm, collected, honest, sincere, and still happy with his opportunity. What do you think will work best?

I interviewed Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn, Flipkart, Franklin Templeton and deleted them all. I have worked with all of these companies.

I gave more than 70 interviews in large and small companies, in India and the US, in a very exhausting job search process after my MS. After that, I took three breaks in my career and interviewed many more companies. Names include Walmart Labs, Target, InMobi, CA Technologies, Karvy, Open Text, Mindtree, BCG, Intellecap, Directi, Leo Burnett, IMRB, Nielsen.

I didn't usually clarify interviews when I started giving them, but with better skills and inte

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I interviewed Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn, Flipkart, Franklin Templeton and deleted them all. I have worked with all of these companies.

I gave more than 70 interviews in large and small companies, in India and the US, in a very exhausting job search process after my MS. After that, I took three breaks in my career and interviewed many more companies. Names include Walmart Labs, Target, InMobi, CA Technologies, Karvy, Open Text, Mindtree, BCG, Intellecap, Directi, Leo Burnett, IMRB, Nielsen.

I didn't use to clarify interviews when I started giving them, but with better interview skills and insight over the years, I have clarified each and every interview I've given in the last 3 years, in part because I've become very selective. with whom I interview. I received offers from Target, Open Text, InMobi, and a few others, but I accepted them from companies I've worked with.

Here are some of the best practices that I recommend using for presentations:

  1. Don't start with your name. The interviewer already knows.
  2. Don't say where you are from in the next sentence. The interviewer may not know the town / city where most of us come from. Focus on passing on your work history.
  3. I like to start with an informal word, like "then." The idea is to keep the conversation going and not make it look like you've recited a paragraph. This is not a living school. Other words could be 'safe', 'good'.
  4. Start with what you are currently doing.
  5. Then mention your last most recent experience.
  6. Use "I" or "we" as it was. If you lead the project you are talking about and guided your stakeholders, use 'me'. If the project was led by someone else, use "we". Be clear from which position of responsibility you were operating.
  7. Just highlight one important thing that you want to highlight or that is unique to each job.
  8. Then mention more past experiences, if any.
  9. You do not need to reveal your entire history if it is too long. Just talk about the jobs relevant to this job, but mention that you worked in another similar domain before for X years.
  10. Many of us have the urge to say everything in the introduction, don't do that. If you made a career change, you don't have to go into detail in the introduction. Save it for a later question.
  11. You can mention roughly how long you worked at a particular company. I refrain from that, instead I like to give more importance to what I worked on.
  12. Mention your impressive titles.

Here's my introduction during the LinkedIn interviews, which is my current job. So I was working with Flipkart.

That is why I currently work with Flipkart as a Senior User Researcher. Your payment page is my competition. I recently worked on their co-branded card with Axis Bank. Prior to this, I worked with Google as part of their Next Billion Users (NBU) team at GPay. It was a product made for India, for new Internet users, so I did a lot of research in Tier 2 cities. Before that, I worked with Microsoft on a combination of design and research functions. I was working on Visio, an enterprise diagramming product. I was previously a data analyst for a few years at Franklin Templeton and a few other companies. I have a couple of master's degrees from the University of Illinois and the National Institute of Fashion Technology.

If you are a student and don't have much experience to talk about, here is another presentation of me when I was changing careers. Back then I was mainly pitching myself into my career and personal projects. I remember this particular interview at CA Technologies for a UX position where I impressed the interviewer. He was very positive with me and said, 'I see you've been using your time very well.'

My last job was at Franklin Templeton Investments, where I worked as a data analyst. Before that, I did a master's degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I studied advertising. Research courses were part of the program and I did some projects around design research. I worked at Franklin Templeton for two and a half years. However, I realized that that field was not for me and I did not enjoy working in an Analytics role. So over the past year, I have invested time in working on what interests me. I've done some self-projects in design, one on ABC and one on XYZ. the XYZ was made for a start-up. ABC was approximately ____ (one line) and XYZ was approximately ____ (one line).

Important note: My self-projects are usually very detailed and I support them with a portfolio, making them very real, not just something I am talking about.

The lessons are the same here, except for these additional ones:

  1. If you are not currently doing anything, start with 'My last job was ...'
  2. Come straight to your education and what specific course you studied that prepared you for the job you are applying for.
  3. Then mention any tiny work experience. It could be in college, in a startup, in the past.
  4. Please indicate why you are interested in this position. Are you passionate about this field? Or were you in a different field that didn't work for you? Do you find this interesting? The answer should be unique to you, as it has the potential to give you an advantage over other applicants.
  5. Tell the interviewer how you developed your skill set: self-projects, reading, hackathon, did you create anything? Show them samples.

With this crisp introduction, you've given the interviewer enough material to ask for more. Now pause and let them do their work.


Answer questions in comments / DM: My self-projects can be found on my Medium profile where I write about my profession. If you look at the older articles, you will find 5 to 6 projects of your own.

For those of you wondering how to recover from your career hiatus, I took advantage of Linkedin every time to find a job. Here are answers on this:

Anshul Agarwal's response to Has LinkedIn helped you get a job? If so, do you have any advice?

Anshul Agarwal's response to How do I find a job on LinkedIn?

Anshul Agarwal's response to How do I find a job on LinkedIn?

The question could mean: what you should never do in an interview.
The question could also mean: What should you do just before leaving an interview.

Assuming you are asking what not to do, a few things come to mind:

  • Never say "It's hard to explain" or a similar phrase. You are being evaluated by how well you can communicate.
  • If they ask "How are you today?" Never complain about the flight, the weather, the kids or anything. You want to show emotion, you want to show that the day is going very well because you are having this interview. You want them to see you as a pleasure to be around. You should be in a
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The question could mean: what you should never do in an interview.
The question could also mean: What should you do just before leaving an interview.

Assuming you are asking what not to do, a few things come to mind:

  • Never say "It's hard to explain" or a similar phrase. You are being evaluated by how well you can communicate.
  • If they ask "How are you today?" Never complain about the flight, the weather, the kids or anything. You want to show emotion, you want to show that the day is going very well because you are having this interview. You want them to see you as a pleasure to be around. You should be in a good mood. Your response should be "I'm great! I'm excited to be here."
  • Never put something on your resume that you can't talk about. People always consider fashion technologies as core competencies. When I ask questions about their core competency and they have no idea, it makes me question their entire resume. It is almost impossible to recover from that.
  • Never say "no" when asked "do you have any questions?" You should always have questions. For instance:
    • When do you expect to make a decision?
    • Can I call you then?
    • Ask about them, how is their day to day. People always like to talk about themselves and you get an idea of ​​what work will be like.
    • Ask them what concerns they have about you. (not a yes / no question). This gives you one last chance to ease your worries.
    • Ask about the project you will be working on.
  • Never talk too much. If each answer takes 10 minutes, the interviewer will only come up with a handful of questions. Give a short and direct answer, and then ask "Would you like me to give you more details?"
  • Practice pausing instead of using a filler word like "ummm", "I like it", "you know", "right?", Etc ... you will look smarter.
  • Never send a 10 page resume. Your interviewer will not read it. Make it easy to browse and understand the gist.
  • Never go to an interview without reading the job description. It sounds silly, but I have people who don't remember the job description. He tells me that they are applying for many other jobs and that this one does not particularly matter to them.

Don't mention things like religion unless it's relevant to the position (for example, teacher of religious education). You may be a good Christian, but that may not match the religion of the interviewer.

Don't mention family commitments, unless they ask about your planned vacations in advance. Caring for a child with special circumstances is great, but an interviewer may feel like they might call you out of work on short notice.

Some interviewers, especially people from the Far East, want to get to know you as a person and later as an employee. Don't take this as offensive, this is how they do it. For example, a company that

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Don't mention things like religion unless it's relevant to the position (for example, teacher of religious education). You may be a good Christian, but that may not match the religion of the interviewer.

Don't mention family commitments, unless they ask about your planned vacations in advance. Caring for a child with special circumstances is great, but an interviewer may feel like they might call you out of work on short notice.

Some interviewers, especially people from the Far East, want to get to know you as a person and later as an employee. Don't take this as offensive, this is how they do it. For example, a company I worked for said that new hires are hired for life. An employee is seldom laid off, and the company likes to keep its employees. That is why it is important that the person can not only do the job, but also fit in. If you are not comfortable answering certain questions, be honest and say so. An elderly man interviewed on the television series House was asked how old he was (clearly a question that should not be asked in an interview). He replied, "I am 21 years old, unless it is relevant to the job."

Very few interviewers are expert interviewers, and if they are, they probably haven't done the job before. Usually it can be your immediate boss and possibly someone who knows the role to ask you job-related questions. Your boss has a series of goals to accomplish. He (She) will want to pass you some of those. If the role is specialized for the company, it is perfectly reasonable to say that you do not know the details.

Finally the standard stuff. Never talk about money unless the interviewer does. If they are offering a range, tell them that ideally you would like the higher end of the range. What are they looking for so that you can claim the highest salary?

Let the interviewer pick up your hobbies if it's on your CV / CV. This is often a good sign, since he is happy with your work and now looks at you as a person. So be prepared to answer questions about your hobbies; It is possible that he shares the same hobby. So if you say you are a golfer, they might ask you a question about the local golf course "How do you pass the creek on day 4?"

Never say or do during the interview

Never look anywhere - keep eye contact

Never play with things in your hand: keep your hands steady, the correct posture, your back straight, your hands and legs extended

Never sit in a chair without a handshake when asked to take a seat: always have a smile, a firm handshake, courtesy

Never go to an interview without a copy of your resume - keep extra copies as HR may take one and you may be asked to meet with the manager for the second round.

Never go with casual clothes, no matter what type of interview it is: jeans, slippers, T-shirt are strict, no, no. Business casual is fine, but check

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Never say or do during the interview

Never look anywhere - keep eye contact

Never play with things in your hand: keep your hands steady, the correct posture, your back straight, your hands and legs extended

Never sit in a chair without a handshake when asked to take a seat: always have a smile, a firm handshake, courtesy

Never go to an interview without a copy of your resume - keep extra copies as HR may take one and you may be asked to meet with the manager for the second round.

Never go with casual clothes, no matter what type of interview it is: jeans, slippers, T-shirt are strict, no, no. Business casual is okay, but check with HR if it's okay.

Never carry anything that makes sounds, key rings with bells, charms in your purse, wristbands or bracelets. Keep it very simple so you don't draw attention beyond your own abilities.

Never be late for your interview. In fact, arrive before the interview time, waiting 10 minutes is fine rather than giving the wrong impression.

Never do phone interviews when people are around, always find a quiet place to talk. It is your potential employer that you are speaking with which may be the best company to work for you.

Never answer the call and say hello when it is a scheduled interview, always answer with your name so the person knows you are calling the correct number.

Never conduct a Skype interview with internet issues, you only get one chance to impress, don't screw that up due to poor connectivity.

Last but not least, never end the conversation without leaving a positive note to the interviewer, it is icing on the cake when you end a conversation well enough that the person remembers all the candidates they can interview.

Throughout your life, you will probably have to prepare for many job interviews. Every interview is different because every job and every interviewer is different. With that said, there are some things that rarely change when it comes to job interviews. Tips to improve interview performance.

Here are five things you should always say (and want to say) in an interview:

1. You know the company very well.

Show the interviewer that you've done your research by talking about your knowledge of the company. Before the interview, check out their website, social media, recent articles, and anything else you might need.

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Throughout your life, you will probably have to prepare for many job interviews. Every interview is different because every job and every interviewer is different. With that said, there are some things that rarely change when it comes to job interviews. Tips to improve interview performance.

Here are five things you should always say (and want to say) in an interview:

1. You know the company very well.

Show the interviewer that you've done your research by talking about your knowledge of the company. Before the interview, check out their website, social media, recent articles, and whatever else you can find. Know the scope of the company and the news related to it. Weave this knowledge throughout your responses, and the interviewer will see your company of real interest.

2. You have the experience to get the job done.

Each interviewer will ask you about your experience. Use this question as an opportunity to show that you have the ability to do the job. Talk about the relevant things you have done and the results of your work. Explain that your success with a previous project will allow you to successfully do something else for this company. Prove your worth.

3. Works well with others.

The ability to work in a team is one of the qualities most desired by employers. An interviewer wants to know how you have worked on a team in the past and how your team was successful. Explain what your role was on the team and how you contributed to the success of the team. Companies want to create teams that can manage themselves and produce strong results.

4. Constantly seek to learn.

Employers want to know that you are open to adapting and learning new methods. Talk about your willingness to keep learning more about your industry. Tell them that you are constantly reading articles on industry trends and talking to mentors for advice (and to actually do these things, don't just say it). Be specific when referring to the posts you read or the blogs you follow.

5. You are motivated.

When you use the word "motivated" to describe yourself, you are expressing some things to your interviewer. First, you want to help the business do well. Second, you are a productive worker. Both of these show employers that they can count on you to get the job done. Explain how your motivation has helped you in the past and how it will help you with specifics related to this new role.

Whether you are applying for a job as an engineer or a clerk, these things hardly change. If you remember to touch these points, you will be better in all your job interviews.

Arriving too early for the interview: Although it is not as bad as being late, arriving more than ten minutes before the appointment can hurt you. The interviewer may feel pressured to see you right now, even if they are not ready. Being early also makes you seem overly anxious, even desperate.

Speak badly of your boss: Everyone in the industry may know that your boss is a fiasco or that the company is in trouble, but if you say so in an interview, you will appear disloyal and uncooperative. If asked directly about your employer, say something positive, even if just "It was an interest

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Arriving too early for the interview: Although it is not as bad as being late, arriving more than ten minutes before the appointment can hurt you. The interviewer may feel pressured to see you right now, even if they are not ready. Being early also makes you seem overly anxious, even desperate.

Speak badly of your boss: Everyone in the industry may know that your boss is a fiasco or that the company is in trouble, but if you say so in an interview, you will appear disloyal and uncooperative. If asked directly about your employer, say something positive, if only, "It was an interesting experience."

Pressure the interviewer: If the interviewer says they will make a decision about the position in the next few weeks, they should say "I will check again." If you have another offer, tell him, but don't try to pressure him into making a decision with his back to the wall.

Talk too much or too little: Do not try to immobilize the interviewer without letting him ask your questions, the interviewer will not like you at all. Follow, rather than guide the interviewer. This will help the interview go smoothly. If you speak more than half the time, you may come off as an aggressive person with no listening skills. If they ask you a question you don't know the answer to ... say "I don't know, but it won't be a problem, I'll pick it up", instead of beating around the bush and answering incorrectly. Speak slowly and clearly ... to the point (even if the interview is over the phone). Provide information only when requested and it must be accurate and convincing.

Dressing or behaving too casually: The company environment can be very informal, but job candidates are expected to dress and behave formally. Show respect! Going to your interview in casual attire when conservative attire is expected can lower your chances of being called back.

Research the company too superficially - You can't be expected to know every aspect of a company you're interviewing for, but if you're interviewing at a Fortune 100 phone company, for example, you should know that your core business is telecommunications. Try to do some basic research on the company or just ask the recruiter who you are working with, they will be happy to tell you.

Asking about salary and benefits too soon: When asked if you have any questions in an interview, DO NOT ask about salary and benefits until there is a basic determination that you are suitable for the job. Usually the interviewer will tell you or you will have an instinct to ask those questions. Remember, if you were sent for an interview through a recruiter, the recruiter has already told the company a base salary range that you are looking for.

These are some of the things I can think of right away.

To Do List:
1) Keep Calm - Walk into the room with a smile. No matter how prepared you are, no matter if you know the answer to their questions or not, stay calm. Panic will only make you forget things and grope to express even what you know.

2) Be honest: be honest about your answers, your experience. Be yourself and support your answers with your own experiences.

3) Eye contact: shows the level of confidence when maintaining eye contact. That doesn't mean you should look at the interviewer :), but you should

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These are some of the things I can think of right away.

To Do List:
1) Keep Calm - Walk into the room with a smile. No matter how prepared you are, no matter if you know the answer to their questions or not, stay calm. Panic will only make you forget things and grope to express even what you know.

2) Be honest: be honest about your answers, your experience. Be yourself and support your answers with your own experiences.

3) Eye contact: shows the level of confidence when maintaining eye contact. That doesn't mean you should stare at the interviewer :), however, you should maintain regular eye contact with the interviewers rather than looking around you or at your shoes.

4) Be attentive - Listen carefully to everything the interviewer says and asks. This shows your interest in the offer you have requested.

5) Ask for clarification - When you do not understand something that is said / asked, do not hesitate to ask for clarification about it.

6) Ask smart questions: do some homework beforehand and ask the questions that have come to mind about your future job / organization. It is not advisable to be unfamiliar with the organization you want to work for.

7) Evaluate the interviewer and the organization: An interview is not only the process of hiring an employee by the employer, but it is also an opportunity for the employee to evaluate his employer (if it is the company that he really would like to join?). It is a two-way street.

8) Humility and gratitude: Whenever you receive help and guidance from your prospective employer, thank him for the same. Be humble and show your gratitude to them.

9) Speak Up - I often see that interviewees are not even audible due to fear and anxiety, even when they know the correct answers. Be audible, show confidence, and don't dominate.

10) Use Common Sense: Sometimes questions are asked to test / validate not our technical skills but human traits. Would you know when your patience is being tested, or you are being asked questions so that they understand if you can express your opinion or not and not for the correct answer, or that you can be a good team player?

List of things not to do:
1) Don't bite your back - No matter how bad your past experiences with current or former employers and employees may have been, never make negative comments about it.
Saying negative things about your previous job only shows that you are not a good team player, complaining, indiscreet and ungrateful. So refrain from talking about negativity. (People are generally tempted to do this when asked by the interviewer to share their experiences from their previous endeavors. Watch out!)

2) Don't slouch: Sit still in your seat with the appropriate meaningful gestures and avoid slouching in your chair. Show your lack of interest. Also don't stand still like a mannequin without any movement.

3) Don't beat around the bush: when you don't know the answer to a question, be honest and say that you haven't had the opportunity to work on it and that you don't know the details of what is being asked.
If you have little knowledge, say so, tell them you only know the high-level details, and explain them in a line or two. So much of your time is valuable and this will help the interviewer move on to the questions with which you have the most experience.

4) No wrong impressions - Don't give the impression that you are joining solely on salary / geographic location. Instead, show your genuine interest in joining the organization for the benefit of both of you. Sometimes people seem to be more focused on benefits than work.

5) No Panic or being Nervous - Do not panic or be nervous. End of they day you can only answer that you know, so don't kill yourself with the guilt of I missed to answer 1 question.

6) Cell Phone - Keep the phone in silent. Do not be looking at it to check the time or the text messages. It only shows your nervousness and lack of interest.

Will add as and when I come across.

Hope this helps! Happy job searching!

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