What sucks the most about a minimum wage worker's job?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Noah Carr



What sucks the most about a minimum wage worker's job?

The way they treat workers. I went to buy tobacco juice for my steamer yesterday. The workers there are typical minimum wage workers ... they do their jobs, they are highly educated and have little to no control over stock, produce, mask policy, or parking.

I was in the store for about 10 minutes. Most of that time I was listening to the guy in front of me scolding the employee because parking was hard to find, they didn't have blueberry flavored vape juice in the guy's preferred strength, they made him wear a mask (the law here changed yesterday , but most companies seem to follow

Keep reading

The way they treat workers. I went to buy tobacco juice for my steamer yesterday. The workers there are typical minimum wage workers ... they do their jobs, they are highly educated and have little to no control over stock, produce, mask policy, or parking.

I was in the store for about 10 minutes. Most of that time I was listening to the guy in front of me scolding the employee because parking was hard to find, they didn't have blueberry flavored vape juice in the guy's preferred strength, they made him wear a mask (the law here changed yesterday , but most companies seem to be sticking with the skins so far), and the tap function was not working on the card machine (I suspect it was the guy's card because it worked for me). The boy remained polite and professional throughout the entire process. When the client turned to leave, I said, "I hope your day improves." The boy behind the counter smiled a little more, but said nothing.

Okay, so the guy behind the counter has no control over any of the things that pissed off this guy. There is literally nothing you can do about it, and you shouldn't be expected to. He shows up on Saturday to win a few bucks. I think you're doing me a favor by being there. And people think they can make fun of him, berate him, and generally feel miserable.

The fact that most of them are designed to have high turnover and the people who work for them are considered expendable. You are not there to be promoted; Exemplary performance is almost immediately forgotten and trivially acknowledged, while mistakes are permanently archived, until they have enough to justify firing them and hiring someone else for a few pennies minus an hour. I have had jobs where one day I was literally employee of the week and the next I was fired, and without explanation.

There are also the BS people who say "you are not there to make a living, you are there to EXPERIENCE", real people

Keep reading

The fact that most of them are designed to have high turnover and the people who work for them are considered expendable. You are not there to be promoted; Exemplary performance is almost immediately forgotten and trivially acknowledged, while mistakes are permanently archived, until they have enough to justify firing them and hiring someone else for a few pennies minus an hour. I have had jobs where one day I was literally employee of the week and the next I was fired, and without explanation.

There are also the BS people who say "you are not there for a living, you are there for EXPERIENCE". Real people don't take minimum wage jobs for "experience", they take it for a paycheck don't starve. And it's highly unlikely you'll get the "experience" you need to climb the business ladder scrubbing floors, hauling trash, and scrubbing toilets anyway.

You are doing the world's work, you are hanging at the bottom link in the corporate chain, you are literally living from week to week and it is up to the whims of your boss and supervisor if you have a job tomorrow. , and there are pretentious jerks on TV, radio or the web 24/7 proclaiming that you don't deserve to be paid enough to survive because all the work you do is not important enough and you should be grateful for all the 'opportunities' they are giving you starvation wages working ... and they are starvation wages, because today's minimum wage when adjusted for inflation is literally half the 1960s minimum wage for the exact same job.

What sucks the most is the low pay. They can be easier than other jobs, they can be more difficult. I had a minimum wage job when I was young that was mentally easy, physically a little more difficult. After years of growing a business and making a lot of money, I got a good deal on the company and sold it. He still wanted to do something and different from what he had done for years. So I looked at Retirementjobs.com. Tried a part-time minimum wage job. It was unusually stressful mentally, even compared to running a business. I quit after a few weeks and started coaching in my old part-time industry for something.

Keep reading

What sucks the most is the low pay. They can be easier than other jobs, they can be more difficult. I had a minimum wage job when I was young that was mentally easy, physically a little more difficult. After years of growing a business and making a lot of money, I got a good deal on the company and sold it. He still wanted to do something and different from what he had done for years. So I looked at Retirementjobs.com. Tried a part-time minimum wage job. It was unusually stressful mentally, even compared to running a company. I quit after a few weeks and started consulting in my old industry part-time for something to do.

The point is, many jobs can suck, or be easy or difficult. And the pay may surprisingly not be related to how easy, difficult, or stressful a job is.

Another point is that employers (including me) will pay people as little as we can, or as little as is legal. And not necessarily because we are bad people. You could do it too.

I really didn't have a problem with my job at McDonald's. In fact, to a certain extent, I thought I was overpaid, because I didn't do anything. I sat at a window and said "Do you want fries with that?" And during downtime, he was putting plastic toys in happy food bags.

When I worked in the factory, it was 110ºF in the factory, I was sweating so hard and it was so hot that the salt crystallized in my hair, so that I could run my hands through my hair and pull it out. white salt crystals on my fingers….

It was hard work. It was hard work. I'd come home, I'd fall into the bathtub to

Keep reading

I really didn't have a problem with my job at McDonald's. In fact, to a certain extent, I thought I was overpaid, because I didn't do anything. I sat at a window and said "Do you want fries with that?" And during downtime, he was putting plastic toys in happy food bags.

When I worked in the factory, it was 110ºF in the factory, I was sweating so hard and it was so hot that the salt crystallized in my hair, so that I could run my hands through my hair and pull it out. white salt crystals on my fingers….

It was hard work. It was hard work. I'd come home, jump into the tub to get the salt out of my hair, and then pass out in bed.

Compared to McDonald's in the air conditioner, hitting Combo # 4 and the oversized and Diet Coke, and dropping some toys into a bag… ..

Minimum wage work was much easier. With much.

Any. Many people start out with minimum wage, even with a college degree (usually liberal arts) and with some work experience. A minimum wage job offers the worker the opportunity to excel… and advance. Most companies SEEK OUTSTANDING EMPLOYEES and WANT to promote employees to greater responsibility.

For those who have no experience, nothing. For those who think of it as a long-term situation that should come with a "living wage," it would be the person's miserable and unmotivated waste of work.

Minimum wage work is a good start for someone just entering the workforce. It teaches you how to do it and what are certain expectations in the workforce. It helps you learn to do things correctly.

Any. The minimum wage worker is excited about the pay he receives for doing the job. So much so, that tomorrow they will return and do it again, voluntarily.

There are many reasons. I don't know all of them, but I will share the ones I do know.

I assume you mean any lower value job when you say "minimum wage job" and there is a difference. I worked at McDonald's for almost 20 years, so I can speak from that angle.

Number one, if you go over 6 months, there is no way (in a corporate store) that you are earning minimum wage. (Note that your boss does his real job.) McDonald's policy states that there is a review every six months and even if it is not an enthusiastic review, there is still a small increase. If small. So after a while you're really not earning my

Keep reading

There are many reasons. I don't know all of them, but I will share the ones I do know.

I assume you mean any lower value job when you say "minimum wage job" and there is a difference. I worked at McDonald's for almost 20 years, so I can speak from that angle.

Number one, if you go over 6 months, there is no way (in a corporate store) that you are earning minimum wage. (Note that your boss does his real job.) McDonald's policy states that there is a review every six months and even if it is not an enthusiastic review, there is still a small increase. If small. So after a while, you're not really earning minimum wage anymore, but even after 20 years, it's not a huge amount. Also, in my store, towards the end of my career, they were not hiring at minimum wage anyway. I don't know if that was all over McDonald's or just my area / store.

I stayed for many reasons, and I don't know if many of them outperformed others until my last 2 years.

First, it was convenient for my schedule. Working at McDonald's led me to college. Yes, I paid 90% of my college bills working at McDonald's. I was lucky to be able to live with my parents and they contributed to my education, but the part that I paid for, I was able to do it. Also, he could work as he wanted and not work when he wanted. It is extremely flexible with a little planning, and if you are reliable and really do your job when you are there, practically permanent for as long as you want.

Second, I liked my co-workers. I valued them as friends and I still see a couple regularly, more than friends from other places. Sure, there were those who would not give CPR, but I have had them in all the jobs that I have worked. But, many of my coworkers gave me life experiences that taught me about life and went through those tough changes.

Third, it was comfortable. He knew what he was doing in the face of a new job that he didn't know about. I didn't have a reason to leave until after college and then my last 2 years.

Fourth, when I graduated, there weren't many openings in my area of ​​education. The few out there didn't hire me and I had the third reason listed to start, so I started substituting and worked both jobs. It worked for me, but Grandpa always wondered when he would get a real job.

Fifth, after "some initial setbacks," let's say, I finally qualified for health insurance. And McDonald's offers its managers GOOD health insurance. This is the reason why I stayed the last 2 years. If I hadn't had it, I would have left much earlier; when I left, I had 5 jobs. 4 of which were in my undergraduate area. All part time. I had also bought my own house and was about to buy my second car. They all work part-time in "a minimum wage job."

Things that I have noticed about my coworkers during those years include:

  • They don't think they can do anything else. (low self-esteem) They live in fear of trying.
  • They made poor financial decisions, so they have no room to take risks in a new job.
  • They don't have many job skills, so they go from store to store, quitting before they get fired and can't be hired. Or get fired, because they refuse to ask for help or work on things like showing up, being on time, being nice to customers, etc.
  • It never occurred to them to try to do something else.

Those 4 don't apply to everyone, but some may overlap.

As for the part of your questions about compensation, they also want to be valued. They are told that they are being undervalued where they are. Who doesn't want to earn more money? If we worked at $ 100 or $ 1000 an hour, and were told long enough that we were paid less than we were worth, wouldn't we want more?

Some people realize their worth and exceed “minimum wage work”, others think the world should turn to them, along with the 4 reasons I mentioned above.

In the end, I think it all comes down to how they were raised.

I'm going to be 100% honest with this answer, and people are going to accuse me of being critical or speaking for the right wing. They're going to ignore this sentence: Every middle-aged person I've personally met in my life who had a minimum wage job falls into one of these categories:

(Edit ... unsurprisingly, many commenters ignored that sentence. These are the situations for the people I personally know ... not everyone who is in that situation. Only the ones I know. Okay? )

  • They started smoking marijuana when they were teenagers and they never had high ambitions to do something with their lives.
Keep reading

I'm going to be 100% honest with this answer, and people are going to accuse me of being critical or speaking for the right wing. They're going to ignore this sentence: Every middle-aged person I've personally met in my life who had a minimum wage job falls into one of these categories:

(Edit ... unsurprisingly, many commenters ignored that sentence. These are the situations for the people I personally know ... not everyone who is in that situation. Only the ones I know. Okay? )

  • They started smoking marijuana when they were teenagers and they never had high ambitions to do something with their lives. This applies to a handful of people I met in high school. They were known marijuana fans in the 1990s and now, according to their Facebook posts, they are still working as part-time cashiers or warehouse people, and still in the marijuana lifestyle. This also applies to some adults I worked with when I was a security guard at a concert hall in my early 20s. Many of them were middle-aged men who would get high after concerts. We all earn minimum wage. For me, it was just one of several jobs I had at the time that, when combined, allowed me to support myself. For some of them,
  • They have a criminal record and / or have been in prison and are trying to recover. Many companies are hesitant to hire someone with a criminal record, so the people in that position are often willing to take whatever job they can get.
  • They receive welfare and cannot earn too much money or they will lose government benefits. I worked with people like that when I was in retail. They were all parents and most of them were very good workers. But, when offered overtime, they declined, and when given mandatory annual raises, they asked for the smallest possible raise ($ 0.10), because they didn't want to earn so much that they no longer qualified for government benefits.
  • They struggle to keep any job, usually due to reliability issues. They basically bounce from job to job every few years, always starting at minimum wage with each bounce. I suspect that many of these people have drug problems.
  • They are married people who took time off from work to start a family and are now returning to the workforce as their children grow older and not as needy. Any money they earn is just additional income, a second income for your spouse's career. They like the part-time minimum wage job because it's easy and it gives them a bit of spending money and something to do with themselves during the day.
  • They live in a small town / rural area where minimum wage is all they need and all that is offered to them anyway. A minimum wage job in the country is usually enough to pay rent and put food on the table, and for some people, that's all they want in life. It is not a lack of ambition, but a desire for simplicity.

Who are minimum wage jobs for?

They are for whoever needs them and were established at a rate where a job should pay for someone to support themselves.

TLDR;

According to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FSLA), they are set at an amount necessary to live (cost of living then and now), "... the Secretary will assess every two years ... ... and it will take into consideration any changes that may have occurred in the cost of living ”.

The objective of the law was summarized as the “elimination of harmful working conditions for the maintenance of the minimum standards of life necessary for health, efficiency

Keep reading

Who are minimum wage jobs for?

They are for whoever needs them and were established at a rate where a job should pay for someone to support themselves.

TLDR;

According to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FSLA), they are set at an amount necessary to live (cost of living then and now), "... the Secretary will assess every two years ... ... and it will take into consideration any changes that may have occurred in the cost of living ”.

The objective of the law was summarized as "the elimination of working conditions that harm the maintenance of the minimum standards of living necessary for the health, efficiency and well-being of workers." - FDR defends the minimum wage

Why is this such a hot topic?

Because the United States and many Western countries block their citizens from the Earth's natural resources.

Here it is explained quite eloquently:

Why do the poor deserve social benefits?

This forces people to seek work from people with money or land. So because someone is imposing this way of life, jobs become necessary to survive. Since the jobs are necessary to survive, the payment for those jobs should be a salary that can cover the basic necessities of living, food, shelter, clothing, and medicine / medical care.

Has poverty come down?

So, to put it another way, if the state prevents people from having food and shelter and forces them to work, then the income from the jobs must be sufficient to cover basic needs or else it is a reckless danger, negligence and death.

Are people supposed to be able to live off minimum wage jobs?

Yes. Don't let people tell you it isn't. The people who tell you that they are not the ones who benefit from paying low wages or are toads (repeaters of what they hear).

In fact, US President Franklin Roosevelt said this:

“Don't let any calamity-howling executive with an income of $ 1,000 a day, who has been turning his employees over to government relief lists to preserve his company's undistributed reserves, tell you - using his money. shareholders to pay the postage for their personal opinions, to tell them that a wage of $ 11.00 a week will have a disastrous effect on the entire American industry. "- 1938, Fireside Chat, the night before the Fair Labor Standards Act was signed which instituted the federal minimum wage.

If it is spoken today,

"Don't let any calamity-howling executive earning $ 55,000 an hour ... tell you ... that a wage of $ 15 an hour is going to have a disastrous effect on the entire American industry."

CEOs in the US earn up to 300 times the average worker. In an hour or in a day they charge you your annual salary. They can afford it. Many multi-billion dollar companies don't even pay taxes and are receiving billions of money from taxpayers called subsidies. They do not earn a basic income but a luxury income every year, while more than 80% of workers live from paycheck to paycheck.

Citing the history of the United States minimum wage:

In the landslide election of 1936, President Roosevelt enacted the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) in early 1938. The FLSA introduced sweeping regulations to protect American workers from exploitation and created a mandatory federal minimum wage of 25 cents a time in order to maintain a "minimum standard of living necessary for health, efficiency and general well-being, without substantially reducing employment."

Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938: Maximum Fight for Minimum Wage

In sec. 203 (l) (2):

The "salary" paid to any employee includes the reasonable cost, as determined by the Administrator, to the employer of providing such employee with food, lodging, or other facilities ...

Second. 204 (d) (1):

The Secretary shall present every two years in January a report to Congress that covers his activities during the previous two years and includes the information, data, and recommendations for additional legislation in relation to the matters covered by this chapter that he deems appropriate. Said report shall contain an evaluation and appraisal by the Secretary of the minimum wage and overtime coverage established in this chapter, together with his recommendations to Congress. In making such an evaluation and assessment, the Secretary shall take into consideration any changes that may have occurred in the cost of living and in productivity and the level of wages in manufacturing, the ability of employers to absorb wage increases, and other factors such as him. . may consider relevant ...

FDR also said:

"No business that depends for its existence on paying less than a living wage to its workers has the right to continue in this country."

"By a living wage, I mean more than a simple subsistence level, I mean the wage of a decent life." (1933, Declaration on the National Industrial Recovery Law)

Any business that relies on exploitative workers should not be allowed in the business.

Now here's the fun part.

Many business owners will get mad at the worker for asking or protesting for a living wage, simply for trying to survive. How selfish are these workers for wanting to have enough money for food and shelter?

But if you look at the big picture, you will see that wages have stayed the same year after year, but the cost of living has increased.

So a person earning $ 1000 a month for the past 20 years saw his rent go from $ 500 a month to $ 2000 a month, while his salary either marginally improved.

The employer gives the salary and the owner takes it away.

So, business owners have diverted their feelings (possibly). It is not the worker who wants to survive that is causing problems. It is the cost of living that has risen year after year that requires higher wages and it is the state that blocks people's food and shelter. And the main reason for this is that rental and housing costs are uncontrollable.

San Francisco has lost his mind

San Francisco Has World's Highest Rental Prices, Says Housing Startup

If business owners want to be upset with someone, do it with the woman who raised her rent from $ 600 a month to $ 1800 a month just because she could (true story). When you have high rental costs, all your money goes toward rent, so as a worker, you have to earn more to cover the higher costs.

If you had control of rents and affordable housing, you would not have protesters or unions demanding increases in the minimum wage every year. People don't protest because they have nothing else to do. There are millions of other things that people would rather be doing, but if they are protesting, you are doing something wrong.

Other countries have free and affordable housing, free health care, and rent control. Why? It is not a mystery. It is not an exact science. See what other countries are doing. In fact, giving people a basic income and health care (Medicare for all) would solve some of the minimum wage problems.

Mathematics are difficult. It is very difficult (for some people). So I have shown with math and evidence how the cost of living, low wages, globalization, automation and an insecure job market are causing large amounts of poverty and homelessness and some suggestions for solving it.

How are 80% of Americans susceptible to homelessness and poverty?

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.