What should you expect from your first acting job?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Jamie Scott



What should you expect from your first acting job?

In your first acting job, you should NEVER expect to be an extra if it's a movie or a movie or be in the set if it's a play or a musical. The Ensemble are those characters that are a lot and have no name. Like Annie's servants.

Most of the actors are very nice and patient with the newer actors when it is the first concerts because they were also beginners once.

When a director tells you to do something, do it. Unless you feel uncomfortable doing it. Generally, on the first job, this shouldn't happen, but it's just a good rule of thumb. If a director

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In your first acting job, you should NEVER expect to be an extra if it's a movie or a movie or be in the set if it's a play or a musical. The Ensemble are those characters that are a lot and have no name. Like Annie's servants.

Most of the actors are very nice and patient with the newer actors when it is the first concerts because they were also beginners once.

When a director tells you to do something, do it. Unless you feel uncomfortable doing it. Generally, on the first job, this shouldn't happen, but it's just a good rule of thumb. If a director really wants you to be in their production and you can't do something for some reason, they will either change it to something you are comfortable with or not force you to do it at all. Seriously.

Let's imagine in your first job, you play an extra in a superhero movie (whatever you want, it's pretend) and you're an extra and you're escaping a monster / villain attack and they tell you to get a baby out of a stroller and run. while holding it in one hand and a small child in the other. If you have very little experience with children, you usually don't want to. Tell the director and they will move it to where you feel comfortable. Or you get fired, but this fantasy is working for us.

He says that he is not comfortable with the baby due to lack of experience with him and that he does not want him to get hurt because of him. They change it to where you:

  • Do not take the baby out of the stroller, but still take the baby and the child to a safe place.
  • Take the baby and put him in a sling so that you can hold him steady with one hand and carry the young child with the other.
  • The baby does not exist and you just need to save the child.

Another thing is, you probably shouldn't expect to get paid, or not much, because you're on your first job, probably as a bonus. At Monty Python and the Holy Grail, they announced that college-age people from the area would come to spend a day of filming in which they will be given a basic knight costume and will be paid 2 euros, or the equivalent of 2.21 dollars, free transportation. and some food for a day's work. 1 and that's really all you can hope for at most.

Footnotes

1 15 facts about 'Monty Python and the Holy Grail'

You should expect moments of joy and excitement, but also a lot of nerves. It will always be overwhelming when you start your first acting job. Remember that it is a journey, learn from all your experiences and you will become a good actor. You can't expect to nail everything right away.

I recommend trying to be as calm and relaxed as possible on set or on stage. To do this warm-up before the concert. If you meditate or do yoga or something like that, make sure you take time in the morning to focus and warm up.

Prepare everything you can. Be polite and if you are acting immediately

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You should expect moments of joy and excitement, but also a lot of nerves. It will always be overwhelming when you start your first acting job. Remember that it is a journey, learn from all your experiences and you will become a good actor. You can't expect to nail everything right away.

I recommend trying to be as calm and relaxed as possible on set or on stage. To do this warm-up before the concert. If you meditate or do yoga or something like that, make sure you take time in the morning to focus and warm up.

Prepare everything you can. Be polite and if you are acting right away, learn your lines backwards!

To learn and keep your mouth shut.

So, it's your first day at the new job; Here are some tips to help you get started on the right foot:

On your marks....

  • Remember that the impact you make in the first few days will have a lasting effect on how you are perceived by your employer and other staff.
  • Take the opportunity to take a fresh approach in areas with which you have struggled in the past, for example, delegating, communicating.
  • Keep your eyes and ears open and your mouth relatively closed for the first few days until you establish the lay of the land.
  • Make sure you remember the names of the people you will come in contact with.
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So, it's your first day at the new job; Here are some tips to help you get started on the right foot:

On your marks....

  • Remember that the impact you make in the first few days will have a lasting effect on how you are perceived by your employer and other staff.
  • Take the opportunity to take a fresh approach in areas with which you have struggled in the past, for example, delegating, communicating.
  • Keep your eyes and ears open and your mouth relatively closed for the first few days until you establish the lay of the land.
  • Make sure you remember the names of the people you will be in contact with regularly (write them down in your little black book if it helps).
  • Look, listen and, when in doubt, ask!


Find your feet

  • As soon as possible, request a meeting with your new boss to review your job description. Ask questions. It is better to be honest now while you are being "defended" rather than 6 months later.
  • Establish where you fit in the household hierarchy: You don't want to be seen delegating to staff who are not within your remit or failing to lead someone who is.
  • Establish personal relationships (if any) within the home: Does the gardener have a relationship with the housekeeper? This is something important!
  • Once you are sure of all of the above, call a staff meeting with the people under your control and give them an opportunity to bring up the areas where they have problems or concerns. Follow this up with individual meetings afterward. The fact that they are happy and productive in their work reflects well on you, so this will pay dividends down the road.
  • Who is unhappy? Is there someone you feel difficult about? Maybe they feel like they should have had their job instead of you?

It's not just who you know ...

  • It is very easy to establish special relationships with some members of the workforce at first. We are talking about friendship here, nothing more! Avoid this. Some of the staff will be friendly to you, others may be waiting to see how you perform and refuse to judge, good for them. Don't alienate the cautious by becoming overly friendly with individuals or a clique.
  • Any work or home environment is full of internal politics and gossip; don't give anyone ammunition that could come back to haunt you later.
  • Be polite, professional, and polite to everyone. Once you are confident in your position and understand all of the above, THEN you can consider any changes you might need.
  • You will soon see staff who need help and guidance. Offer it in a professional and friendly manner. Help people in any way you can (without being taken advantage of) and you will soon be the respected professional you deserve to be.



DO:

  • Be on time and dress well. If you are instructed to be there by 8 am, please arrive by 7:50. If the dress code is business casual, you probably shouldn't wear jeans. You may even want to wear a tie on the first day (gentlemen) or a business suit (ladies). No one will make fun of you for dressing too much, at least not on your first day. Remember: overdressing won't become the hot topic of the afternoon coffee spiel, but overdressing will. "Did you see that new guy in jeans?" "Yeah, what does he think this bar is?"
  • Shake hands with everyone you meet and be open. My first day working at the cooperative was very lucky: everyone wanted to shake my hand and talk about me. Where I come from, my interests and how I got the job. Answer the questions, even if they are older. If someone asks you if you like skiing or if you like Starbucks coffee, feel free to answer the question. Age is something that disappears in the office. Just because someone is older doesn't mean they are above you or that you need to be bullied. Also, be sure to brush your teeth and wear a little cologne / perfume (again, in moderation!), As first impressions tend to last quite a long time.
  • Work until the end when it's time to work. If it's your first day, you will work hard. Get over. Don't complain and do it right. Take your time and if you have any questions, try to solve them. If you can't figure it out, don't ask right away. Skip it and compile a list of questions on the go. That way, when you are “done” you can ask 10 questions at a time instead of asking 10 individual questions and probably anger and annoy your supervisor / manager / mentor. Remember that being proactive will go a long way. If you are an "entrepreneur", you will certainly impress people.
  • Make sure your humor is office-appropriate. I had a friend in college who got a cooperative and couldn't make many friends. Well bro, it's probably because your 30-year-old coworkers don't think Family Guy references to women's rights are funny. When you rub a person the wrong way, that person immediately goes and tells all their co-workers about that inappropriate joke you made.
  • But honestly, the older employees in the office probably don't watch South Park anymore, and they're probably not playing the latest Call of Duty, so they don't want to hear how cool that triple death you had with your guys was. At 3 in the morning it was last night. Anything that sparks a good conversation is a great icebreaker, or you can always wait for someone else to start a good conversation. Use your good judgment.


NOT TO DO

  • Talk too much, too loud, or laugh at everything. I say this from experience. I have a very recognizable laugh. On my first day, I made sure to tone it down. It is a fact that people in offices talk about new ones. These are generally not positive (sad, but true) conversations, and if you give them something to scoff at, they will. This provides you with another barrier that you must jump before you can earn their respect. Also, it's probably a good idea to leave your sparkly heels (women) or white tuxedo shoes (men) at home. Dress to impress, but don't overdo it.
  • Grab your laptop, sit on your cube, and be quiet. If someone asks you if you want a coffee, say yes. Even if you don't like coffee, you don't need to drink it. Take a ten minute break and make sure your coworkers know that you are not a serial killer. If someone asks you to go to lunch, go! You will learn a lot about your co-workers and you will also give them the opportunity to learn about you. Friendships between offices can be key parts of life, especially if you've moved house.
  • Be introverted, wait for people to give you jobs or surf the internet. If you are out of work or finished something, ask for more immediately. Ask your supervisor, ask your manager, ask your other co-workers, ask everyone.
  • Don't go back to your computer, surf the internet and wait for someone to provide you with a new task. Worse still, let your manager know immediately when you finish something and ask him to go over it in front of you so you can take notes on your mistakes. In fact, I recently worked with an intern who didn't tell me when anything was done. This means I have to end up micromanaging and constantly asking them how their progress is going. Don't be that intern or that employee.
  • Get to know everyone. Join the company softball team. Join the people who play golf and basketball and participate in all company events. Even if you are not an athlete, people like people who try. Start a recipe club. Start a wellness committee. Find other people who like running or knitting as much as you do. Share books and workouts with your co-workers.


Summary

All in all, make sure you are an open, hard-working, and motivated employee. Make friends, don't be introverted, and make sure to stay focused when it's time to stay focused. Learn how to make coffee; this will sometimes earn respect (especially in my office). Learn when to complain and when to keep it up.


Whether you work for a multinational bank or even a small cat food manufacturing company, the nerves on the first day of work can be stressful in the sense that anything you do or say can make or break. It will also determine who will talk to you and who will avoid you.

Your immediate supervisor will usually make a hasty first impression judgment that you may have to work hard to maintain or fix. How do you survive the emotional and physical demands of the first day at work?

The 3 main sources of stress

Before even setting foot inside your new workplace, you will be inundated with stressful thoughts. The top 3 stressors would be: your work attire, your communication skills, and your expectations.

How should you dress?
The general rule of thumb is to dress for work, not for play or partying. When you were interviewed, you should have paid attention to the dress code, and this is what you should try to follow. The fact that you are new is already the most outstanding feature; You don't need to outshine others by dressing inappropriately. The acceptable dress code should be followed not only on the first day, but also during your period of employment.

How should you communicate?

There are two ways to communicate: verbal and non-verbal. His way of dressing is not verbal; what comes out of your mouth is verbal. Thus, there are more ways to communicate non-verbally through movements, facial expressions, attitudes, your choice of food and coffee, body language… the list can go on forever. The essential point is that you send various signals in subtle ways - reading comics at work will likely make your coworkers believe that you are not doing the job you were hired for, for example.
The best advice you can get about your communication skills is to watch what you say and do before you do it. This means thinking about what you are going to say before saying it and being aware of your actions. For example, don't let your eyes wander when your supervisor is talking to you and avoid pointing at people. Being in South Africa, which is a diverse and multicultural environment, makes it more difficult than usual; so adapt to the person in front of you and "take it easy."

Expectations
Be positive about yourself and it will help you get through the day. Just as you have expectations of your new job, people in your work environment have expectations of you. Try to take the middle ground until you get your bearings. The good news is, it's only day one and most people are willing to give newbies more than one day to adjust, including their immediate boss.

Potential problem
Every work environment has its own piece of politics. This refers to current hot topics, gossip and power plays and emerging leaders struggling to get more attention. Stay away from politics; stay neutral.
There will also be difficult workers or supervisors as a real potential problem. Be patient and let them say what they want. It's usually about not wanting to upset your balance or feel threatened by a new person in the office. You have to accept that you cannot make everyone happy. However, if there is a risk to your safety, review your options for reporting behavior or attitude.

Ultimately, your new job means responsibility and a new career. You have the keys. Try to take control of the job and exceed expectations. You must also document your accomplishments. Each day that you survive and excel at work is another stepping stone to something better.


Sources: First day of work: what to do and what not to do on your big day, How to survive your first day of work: what to do and what not to do, first real job? Here are the dos and don'ts for your first month

My first job was in a management consulting company. Although I did not particularly enjoy these two years, I learned many things that have been useful as my career progressed.

  1. At first, attitude matters as much or more than the actual result. Nobody likes working with an idiot, even if he's good. Sure if you're extraordinary you can get away with it, but most of us aren't THAT good at anything. (let's say like Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods or Alex Rodríguez)
  2. Until you are the CEO, regardless of your title or job description, your real job is to make life easier for your boss / supervisor.
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My first job was in a management consulting company. Although I did not particularly enjoy these two years, I learned many things that have been useful as my career progressed.

  1. At first, attitude matters as much or more than the actual result. Nobody likes working with an idiot, even if he's good. Sure if you're extraordinary you can get away with it, but most of us aren't THAT good at anything. (let's say like Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods or Alex Rodríguez)
  2. Until you are the CEO, regardless of your title or job description, your real job is to make life easier for your boss / supervisor. The sooner you realize it's about them, and not you, the smoother things will get.
  3. Take performance reviews with a grain of salt, they will never be perfectly accurate; As with all things, there are human prejudices and irrationality built into the system. You are not as good or as bad as what your review explicitly says. Use everything you receive as feedback, that you can process, and choose whether or not you want to make those changes.
  4. Attention to detail is very important, so learn to be detail-oriented, even if that's not your normal mode of operation. Because in groups of humans, it is about building trust. Having double-checked everything and really being on top of your game is the easiest way to build that trust over time with people you don't know that well.
  5. Be a net energy adder to a room, not a net energy scavenger. It almost always pays to be positive, even when you disagree.
  6. No amount of money is worth getting bored with. If you are not committed to what you do, change it unless you have some family obligations that you cannot get out of.
  7. When you start out, your work will mainly consist of 100% things that you don't necessarily want to do. As you get more senior and more confident, you earn the right to accept jobs / jobs that have a higher percentage of things you like to do / enjoy and a lower percentage of things you don't like to do but have to do
  8. Cultural fit is a big deal, you can be a total stud in one setting and a total failure in another, even while acting exactly the same. Be honest with yourself when looking for a culture in which you would enjoy working. For those of you who are very much against doing things someone else's way, start something yourself!
  9. If you don't tell your coworkers or boss what you want, they have no way of knowing. By simply accepting the entire status quo, you are implicitly saying that you agree with the way things are. But be respectful and considerate when you do, without right or greed.
  10. You won't know what you want to do for the rest of your life from your first job. (some people do, but it is rare). Instead, focus on A / B testing in your own life - try to absorb all the things you experience and find out what you enjoy, what you don't enjoy, what kind of people you like to work with, etc. Use the first job to expose yourself to as many variations as possible, so you can make better decisions in the future.

First, I think you need to be clear about what you mean by a career in acting. Most of us, when we come to Hollywood, we want anything and everything. We want to be a movie star but we will make a background or student movie. Never mind. We don't think we can choose, so we don't. But like any profession, the more specific you are about your goals, the easier it will be for others to help you and imagine that you are successful, and these are two very important things. You never know who is going to help you, so you have to assume that everyone can do it. And you have to radiate success so that people want to help you. No

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First, I think you need to be clear about what you mean by a career in acting. Most of us, when we come to Hollywood, we want anything and everything. We want to be a movie star but we will make a background or student movie. Never mind. We don't think we can choose, so we don't. But like any profession, the more specific you are about your goals, the easier it will be for others to help you and imagine that you are successful, and these are two very important things. You never know who is going to help you, so you have to assume that everyone can do it. And you have to radiate success so that people want to help you. Nobody likes people who think they don't need help, don't know what they want, or are clearly not ready for success.

Here are some possible careers you could have: Show
host. Think Ryan Seacrest or Jules Asner. These are positive, optimistic people with big smiles and clear voices. You may have fame and fortune, but you go a lot of time without a script. It's not so much about acting as it is about being a personality, the kind of person that everyone wants to be friends with. Start a YouTube vlog and try creating your own audience.

Soap star. I'm talking about television during the day. Most of these were shot in New York, but some were shot in Los Angeles. It's true that some movie stars got their start in soap operas, but generally people who make soap operas stay on soap operas. It is a very particular type of performance and it pays well. It's a 9 to 5 job. You need to be attractive, in good shape, and be good with facial expressions. Start by doing some background work for the soap you want to be on.

Commercial actor. Most actors want a commercial agent and a theater agent. The idea is that commercials finance their "real" aspiration. But actors who do very well in commercials rarely act "for real." The more you play, the more you win and some take the jackpot and become spokespersons like Flo for Progressive. Commercial acting is about auditioning. The work itself is not difficult but you have to reserve it. Get as much training, help, and advice as possible for business auditions. Start taking improv classes and get an agent. Commercial agents are pretty easy to come by. If you ever meet a casting director socially, ask him if you can spend a day (or more) in his office watching auditions. Offer to work for free. This is the absolute best way to learn what to do and what not to do.

Theater actor. If you want to make a living doing this, you need to have a very solid theater training. You need to know how to sing or dance or both. You must first be willing to travel, be bi-coastal, or make a name for yourself in the regional theater. Many actors successfully go from stage to film, but few go the other way around unless they are a star. You will love reading and watching plays. Hear all you can. The way to succeed here is to stay on stage and make a good impression.

Funny. This can be a comedian if you like to write jokes or want to be the only one on stage. You can be a sketch comedian, if you aspire to be on SNL or MadTV. Many comedies are broadcast solely from Groundlings and Second City. Start by watching a lot of comedies and comedies live in movies or on television. Go through the Groundlings or Second City show and focus on developing characters and writing. Or create a personality for yourself, write material and practice with open mics.

Sitcom actor. Most of these come from a comedy background, so check out the notes above. Sitcoms are all about comedy timing, being a compelling character, and having spontaneity. Perfect your personality and live it. Are you the dumb blonde? The nerdy boy? The womanizer, the seducer, the conspirator, the rock? Dress the part, speak the part, walk the part. Write your own material, record it, put it on YouTube. Hold workshops with the best sitcom casting directors and keep trying to get an agent to show up for the pilots.

Dramatic television actor or film actor. This is what most people want, to be a movie star. Because most actors want it, there is more competition, less rhyme or reason as to who is successful, and a greater likelihood of being frustrated. It helps to be young. I would say that more than half of the people who become recognized actors started as children, had the full support of their parents, and were engaged in acting even before graduating from high school. It is very rare for actors who start out in Hollywood in their late twenties or older to become stars. That's a fact and you can ignore it if you want, but it won't necessarily go away. Helps to look incredibly handsome. There are exceptions, of course, but most movie stars are very attractive. The exceptions are often called character actors. So be a character!

It also helps to be well connected. And this is the hardest part. If you come from a family that knows the best agents, producers, cinematographers, directors, writers, and casting directors in town and you can call on those people to get you started in the business, you are infinitely more likely to succeed. If you have those connections, use them. Do not be proud or stubborn, you will regret it. If you don't have those connections, try establishing them. Look at alumni organizations, connect with people from acting classes, ask friends and family they know in Los Angeles, call everyone and tell them what you are doing. You have to be willing to spend at least ten or even twenty years doing this before you can aspire to be a working actor. I wish it was an exaggeration.

The most important thing is to keep acting and that may be the hardest part. You have to create exposure and demand for your talents. You cannot be "trying to be an actor", you have to "be an actor". Act in student films, write and film your own films with friends, go to writer's groups and showcases where actors can act (try to find the free ones), enroll in acting classes (if they are highly recommended), volunteer for Young Storytellers. Try to get to know as many people as possible and get involved as much as possible. Volunteer at film festivals and theaters, go to shows and screenings, join groups. Be the person people see wherever you go.

This is a business, so have business cards. Be prepared to answer the question "What kind of acting do you like to do?" Have a list of five actors you admire, whose careers you want. Have a list of five directors you would kill to work for. Have a list of writers who write the kind of dialogue that makes you want to act. Know the players like the back of your hand. Don't speak ill of anyone, ever. Nobody wants actors with opinions. They want actors with interests, experiences, feelings, passions. Explore yours. What can you do? Used to be a cop? A doctor? Did you get a degree in chemistry? Do you drive a motorcycle? Are you from Texas? Can you tie a steer? Were you a beauty queen? Can you juggle? Are you a redhead? Do you speak Farsi? Are you an immigrant? Can you recite poetry? Do you play tennis? Don't be generic. To be interesting. Be memorable. Create a personality. Change your name if you wish. Do not give up.

If you just want to be on set, there are also background actors (extras), understudies, and body doubles. The last two can pay quite a bit and you can work with the best talent in the business. Keep your body in shape and be willing to take a back seat.

Any other advice:
Get a job. The idea that you can't work full time and be an actor is ridiculous. It takes a long time to establish a career. Get an industry-related job if you can to feel connected to it. Don't try to hide that you are an actor, but emphasize that you want to work hard and learn all aspects of the business. Be trustworthy. To be professional. Once you've proven yourself, you'll have the flexibility to audition or be able to do something else, but you'll have made some good connections and learned a few things along the way. Try not to spend too much money on headshots, workshops, and classes. Save if you can.

Be professional at all times. Acting is a job. It can be a fun, easy, and wonderful job, but it's only one part of a multi-million dollar business. Learn to find your light, hit your mark, keep your body still, know your lines, take multiple shots, handle props, and be generous to other actors. Know that many actors become hairdressers, makeup artists, location seekers, producers, writers, agents, managers, head photographers, acting coaches, and casting directors. Almost everyone you know wanted to perform at the same time, so be humble and respectful of what others bring to the table.

Keep positive, motivated, hard-working, and personable friends. Get rid of idiots and negative people. Kindly accept offers of help, opportunities, and advice. Stay true to yourself and don't lose sight of what you want. Learn the names of the people. Be good. And don't forget to have a life. Travel, learn new things, read books, make friends, and stay in touch with people at home. They are your reminder of why you decided to do this in the first place and they love you for you.

My first job was bringing urine and stool samples from elderly and disabled patients to the doctor's office ... yes, I mean it. Although most of us who read this probably didn't believe it at first, I bet most of us are also healthy enough to go to the doctor's office to take a urine sample. However, there are many people (I would say that 99% of the patients I encountered were over 80 years old; one couple was almost 100 years old) who simply cannot go to the doctor's office to deliver a sample. And the saddest part? Usually these people are alone, with no family m

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My first job was bringing urine and stool samples from elderly and disabled patients to the doctor's office ... yes, I mean it. Although most of us who read this probably didn't believe it at first, I bet most of us are also healthy enough to go to the doctor's office to take a urine sample. However, there are many people (I would say that 99% of the patients I encountered were over 80 years old; one couple was almost 100 years old) who simply cannot go to the doctor's office to deliver a sample. And the saddest part? These people are usually alone, without family members to help them (otherwise their children or grandchildren would have brought them to the clinic).

I remember one more patient, who was about 90 years old according to the date of birth in her registry. I got to his house around sunset. The door of his house was open and he could hear the television on in his house. Ring the bell. There was no response from inside the house. I rang the bell again. Once again, there was no response. At this point, I freaked out; I thought there was a possibility that my patient had already moved on (remember, this lady is over 90 years old). I got her pregnant. No response. I gently called. No response. Finally, I almost had to yell, “ARGUE! I'm here for your sample! "Only then did I finally hear something.

It seemed like the old woman had fallen asleep while watching TV (thankfully). "Just a minute!" From the door, I could see his shadow rise from the sofa. He moved slowly to where (I guess) the refrigerator was. During this time, I heard a lot of banging and banging. I asked him if he needed help, but he said he was fine. Finally he gave me his urine sample; The whole process took about 15 minutes.

When I left, I couldn't help but wonder why this kind old woman, who clearly couldn't take care of herself, lived alone. Where were your children? Grandchildren? I assumed her husband had already left. It's been about 7 years since then ... I wonder how it will be. Is she still around?

Although it was not what I considered a pleasant job, I learned a lot about myself and life during this job. Many of the elderly patients I had visited were some of the kindest but also loneliest people I have ever met. Many of them had that pitying look on their faces when they saw me, as if a young man like me shouldn't be wasting his youth doing this job.

To this day, I have a soft spot for the elderly; It may not always be obvious to other people, but I secretly and silently judge others based on how they treat the elderly.

TLDR; It took me almost 2 years, visits to 7 cities in India, selection rounds with more than 30 companies and numerous visits to fake companies ** before I got my first job.

** I have written about false / invalid job openings below.

After graduating from NIT Silchar, one of the leading engineering universities in India, and still being the only one in our branch of around 35 students, who, despite having no arrears, were unable to get a job through the placements on campus, I am largely responsible for everything myself. To sum up the college campus days, my CPI / CGPA was 6.23, lower than the cutoff criterion.

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TLDR; It took me almost 2 years, visits to 7 cities in India, selection rounds with more than 30 companies and numerous visits to fake companies ** before I got my first job.

** I have written about false / invalid job openings below.

After graduating from NIT Silchar, one of the leading engineering universities in India, and still being the only one in our branch of around 35 students, who, despite having no arrears, were unable to get a job through the placements on campus, I am largely responsible for everything myself. To sum up the college campus days, my CPI / CGPA was 6.23, lower than the cutoff criteria from IBM (which was the first company to visit and offered massive offers) and a few other companies. I was not technically strong or confident or very good at communication skills and most of all I just followed others, rather than realizing what I wanted. There was also the confusion of focusing on branch / core companies (my branch was Electronics & Telecommunications) or IT companies and I couldn't even stick to a plan. In the early days, when companies were hiring in bulk, I had a hard time clearing out the written rounds. Then I started to get rejected in the group discussion rounds and finally when I got to the final technical rounds the number of candidates required by them dwindled to a few and I ended up graduating without a job.

Here is a screenshot of the excel sheet, which I started keeping when I had a lot of free time, after moving to Bengaluru, the IT capital of India, in search of work.

Note: this sheet shows the list of companies that came to our university campus for internships and I appeared. By the way, I have attended at least 91 companies on January 28, 2017 (I attended at least one round).

In the first few months of my stay in Bengaluru, I skipped some job fairs and walk-ins because I wanted to "prepare" first, and finally realized that, in my case, it was a waste of time. I also remember making excuses to a close friend, who used to be worried about me, saying that I would need some time to improve my health as well, before I started looking properly. I know, I was very stupid. I had also decided not to pay for any professional courses, because I knew there could never be a job guarantee and I didn't want to feel stupid about not getting a job even after spending another Rs. 50,000, which would be roughly 2 years of fees my father had paid for my engineering.

When I was "ready", which was probably after a month or two, it was almost the end of 2007 and the infamous Great Recession had started to show its impact on the job market. I remember one time that almost a month had passed without hearing of a single valid vacancy. I was spending hours every day at the nearby cyber cafe, desperately crawling my mailbox, job boards, and various other job portals I knew about. I was left with no choice but to keep reviewing the technical stuff regularly, which was the hardest part. He could barely remember after a few days what he had studied from the Javanese book he had. I hated going through the same things knowing there was no set date for the test / interview. I couldn't stick to any solid plan.

  • take the city bus service day pass and take an unknown route to travel to the other end of the city and back.
  • watching only a few select movies such as Welcome to Sajjanpur, Taare Zameen Par, which had proven to push the right buttons in my mind to release stress (sometimes Malèna too: P).

But it goes without saying that I couldn't help but escape the depression. By then I had stopped meeting most of my friends from work because I was afraid that I would be the only stranger and spoil their fun with my sad situation. I also applied for the walk-in process for a BPO / callcenter job, mainly to get some change, because I had spent a lot of time sitting at home. However, I was unable to proceed to the second round of the process after hearing that it was a night shift job.

Here is a list of some of the most disappointing / frustrating moments during my stay in Bangalore:

  • I traveled to Chennai, after receiving an email about an Infosys unit, which ultimately turned out to be a fake call, initiated by someone else. More than 200 people had arrived from cities as far away as Delhi, and all collectively asked Infosys officials to carry out a recruitment process, but disagreed.
  • I had also traveled to Hyderabad to attend a job fair, but then realized that, excluding a few companies, most of the others were not IT companies. It hurt me more to remember the events of the job fair in Bengaluru, which I had skipped at the beginning.
  • I had a friend from university who had joined me after 1 or 2 months of moving to Bangalore, to stay close to my home. We had a few months of job hunting together. I had finally found a regular company and we also used to relax together watching movies, having lunch, visiting the nearby parks, etc. But suddenly one day he left town and after calling him, I knew he had taken a job at Samsung and moved in with some other friends. I was horrified for a moment, to find myself alone again. Also, two other of my friends from university, who had come to Bengaluru after me, also got their respective jobs before me.
  • I caught chickenpox towards the end of my job hunting days, in Bengaluru, exactly when I had started to see some vacancies and had felt the market return to normal. He was waiting for the results of some companies that he had appeared in. I was frustrated because I didn't know how long it was going to take me to recover. In order not to worry my parents any more, I decided not to inform them about my illness. It was hard keeping it to myself. Fortunately, my friend (from the previous point who had suddenly left me) came to my rescue to fill my gas stove.
  • I was publicly abused while on my way to a job interview. See my answer to Have you ever taken revenge? If so, what were the consequences and what did you learn?

And then there were these numerous bogus companies, or companies that place fake openings, that seem genuine at first glance, but you realize it once you visit them, or sooner if you have some experience. I used to call these beggar companies. I had so many frustrating encounters with these types of companies, with so many ways of manipulating candidates of their own that I will have to put them under individual bullets.

  • There was a walk-in tour of a company where the first round was a long written test, which took me almost 3 hours to complete. They asked for time during lunch to evaluate the responses. Then in the interview round, after having a discussion, they finally got to the point and said that the candidate had to pay a large amount of money, around Rs. 30 to 50 thousand (probably for training expenses). The psychological trick of taking a long written test was probably to project themselves as more selective and therefore better than others. Also, many candidates who had already been exhausted by many tests could have agreed to surrender after this one and pay the money.
  • There was an email from a company that mentioned that they called me because of a microcontroller training I had gone through. It was paid training that I had attended in Mysore, while I was at my university, following others, by the way. My purpose was simply to add a bullet point to the resume rather than a real interest in the subject. Anyway, going back to this company, when asking others who had come to attend the process, the majority told me that they had also undergone similar professional training. I started to feel that it would probably be a genuine company. That day I had a written test and after a few days I received this email:

Hello there,

Greetings from Emminent Embedded Solutions
We appreciate your interest shown and your valuable time at our facility to take a written test.
We would like to inform you that you have been selected for the position of "ENGINEER TRAINED PROJECT".
The company provides training and salary.
Meet our Operations Manager with a copy of this letter every business day between 10 a.m. M. And 5 p.m. M.

Emminent Embedded Solutions is a software development and outsourcing company.
We are not an institute to provide training and send you with a paper.
We train you because we need you for our projects.

Thank you, Regards,
Team Recruitment,
Emminent Embedded Solutions.

Although I felt some pleading, I ignored it and kept my fingers crossed. I also ignored the poor English (I meet our manager ... every business day), hoping it was just a mistake. I went to his office and then they got to the main point. The candidate had to pay Rs. 65,000 to get a job there. Then they would provide training for 3 or 6 months or so, during that period they will give a salary of Rs. 7500 per month. However, at any point in between, one can be expelled with a 2-month notice, if performance was not up to scratch. So you can see that the total salary could at most be Rs. 45000, still Rs. 20,000 less than what you pay.

  • For another walk-in trip, I came to this complex of buildings somewhere in Malleshwaram, which had many IT firms and consultancies occupying a room or two. This was a consultancy and there was a fee of Rs. 200 to appear for a written test, which would make you eligible for your multiple client processes. I showed up for the test but never heard from them. After a while, I had to go to the same building for another company's process. The previous one was gone. I wouldn't be surprised if he left the place after some income. From what he had heard, that building and several other similar building complexes are used by those cheaters who take the place for some time, win, and then pack up.
  • I received this contact through a newspaper ad (I was so desperate by then that I had begun to look forward to each and every available source or person). Looking for the address with the help of Google Maps, I came to the residential areas of JP Nagar. It was a home and this person made me sit in their living room. He took a look at my resume and quickly pointed out some problems. Of those I remember, one was that he had written "Sex: Male", which should have been "Gender: Male", because Sex was a medical term. Second, he hadn't mentioned any references, without which he would never be able to get a job in this situation. Now the main part. I could pay you Rs. 500 to use your name as a reference and I would also send my resume to your huge list of esteemed clients.
  • After rounds of proper written and technical interviews from a company, they asked me to sign an agreement to deposit my original 10th class (high school) grade sheet, which would be with them for 18 months. If I wanted to leave, I would have to pay a hefty sum of around Rs. 50,000. So far I was fine, given my situation and market conditions. He knew very well that depositing the score sheet was normal. But my problem was with the salary conditions. There would be no salary for the first 3 months (this was fine for me too), but then the salary thereafter would be decided at the end of the 3 months, based on my performance. At the time, there was no salary figure written in the offer letter.

However, I decided not to and I raised this condition with them so that they would give me in writing the minimum wage that they were going to pay me after the 3 months. They rejected my proposal and this episode ended.

  • Then there was this company, called Rajesh Global Solutions, in Whitefield, where there was a walk-in all day. When I arrived, there was still a good crowd and they said there would be no more process now, and interestingly, anyone who wanted to join, could join from the next day, if they agreed to the following conditions:
    • there will be no salary.
    • candidates will not have to deposit money or report cards.
    • candidates had to carry their own laptops every day.

I used this as an opportunity to rehab, in the company of active job seekers, after being lonely and depressed for months. I joined there, along with about 10-15 other people. I used to commute every day from the opposite end of town, carrying my heavy laptop on my shoulders, switching two buses, taking almost 3 hours in total. What was the job? Well, nothing really. We used to look for candidate resumes on job portals like naukri etc. to create your own database. There used to be regular meetings with speeches from the CEO and a Business Development guy who used to try to motivate us to look beyond "low paying" software jobs and into other high paying options. After several speeches of this kind with abstract content, We finally understood that they wanted us to get into sales and marketing of things like household items, for example, water purifiers, etc. There was also a technical team there, who said they were about to get a project and would need one or two guys to work on PHP. A test will be carried out to select it. I got serious about learning PHP and quickly understood a lot. Although the test was never done, I was able to add PHP to my resume, and that was helpful because I started getting more calls for PHP openings, which were comparatively less profitable. who said they were about to get a project and would need a guy or two to work on PHP. A test will be carried out to select it. I got serious about learning PHP and quickly understood a lot. Although the test was never done, I was able to add PHP to my resume, and that was helpful because I started getting more calls for PHP openings, which were comparatively less profitable. who said they were about to get a project and would need a guy or two to work on PHP. A test will be carried out to select it. I got serious about learning PHP and quickly understood a lot. Although the test was never done, I was able to add PHP to my resume, and that was helpful because I started getting more calls for PHP openings, which were comparatively less profitable.

Towards the end, he had almost decided to get a fake work experience certificate from a job to fill the gap of almost a year, but he was very scared by the risk of being blacklisted. But luckily I didn't have to do that. Finally, after spending almost 11 months in Bengaluru, I got a call from this company called ADPS Software Solutions, who offered me a PHP-based job and my ordeal ended. This company was also in a residential area, in HSR design, and that was one of the reasons why some of my friends decided not to attend, fearing it might be a fake. It was a one-room corner office on the top floor of a residential building. I had so many doubts that when I was offered the job during the interview with the CEO, I asked him if he had to pay something as a deposit. Surprisingly, he said no. Although,


If this is not enough, I am leaving with this memorable song, which used to be played repeatedly in the internet cafe where I used to spend a lot of time, that made it even more difficult for me (watch the video for an energetic super duper dance) -

Movie Gaja Kannada - Aitalakadi | HD video song | Darshan, Navya Nair

By the way, there were also many melodious songs in Kannada, many of them sung by Sonu Nigam, for example Anisutide yaako indu.

My first day in the office was June 1, 2018.

I was nervous and excited the day before and slept quite early, around 11pm. I woke up at 7 in the morning the next day. This was unusual, but more importantly, it brought me positivity. In college, there have been days where I slept at 7 in the morning after eating breakfast and now it was earlier.

A good rest and breakfast is in itself an excellent start to the day. This is what I felt on my first day of work.

Welcome to the professional world.

I arrived at my office at 9:30 am. The company I work for is quite small (offshore consulting startup) and there is only 1

Keep reading

My first day in the office was June 1, 2018.

I was nervous and excited the day before and slept quite early, around 11pm. I woke up at 7 in the morning the next day. This was unusual, but more importantly, it brought me positivity. In college, there have been days where I slept at 7 in the morning after eating breakfast and now it was earlier.

A good rest and breakfast is in itself an excellent start to the day. This is what I felt on my first day of work.

Welcome to the professional world.

I arrived at my office at 9:30 am. The company I work for is quite small (offshore consulting startup) and there are only 10 employees in total. So there was no formal introduction between the employees and me. My company was founded by my final year students from IIT Kharagpur and all employees are from the same university only. So there is nothing formal between any of us. In fact, my principal (my senior year at my university) started explaining to me the work they are currently doing within the first 5 minutes of my entry into the office. Post that, they assigned me a desk and asked me to start learning a software.

We all had lunch at 1 and since it was my first day (and also with the fact that I am the youngest employee) my superiors were making light jokes (Well ...). The power went out after a while and we all went out onto the balcony. The view from my office balcony (Mumbai) -

I left the office at 7 in the afternoon.

All in all, it was a satisfying experience, something I had thought about before (and I suppose yearned for).

12 is, bedtime.

Cheers to everyday life.

An acting career is a quaint term from a long time ago. My father, John Cullum, has had a "career," but it started in 1956, when you could actually pay your rent in New York City doing Shakespeare. Nowadays, if you are in your 30s, it is almost impossible to earn a decent living from a legitimate acting job (the younger you are, the greater your chances - a talented 8-year-old girl can quickly rack up her college tuition). For example, I am currently doing Shakespeare in Glendale, CA. My salary? $ 15 per show! I can do a lot of plays and chase the camera and work with intermittent success, because

Keep reading

An acting career is a quaint term from a long time ago. My father, John Cullum, has had a "career," but it started in 1956, when you could actually pay your rent in New York City doing Shakespeare. Nowadays, if you are in your 30s, it is almost impossible to earn a decent living from a legitimate acting job (the younger you are, the greater your chances - a talented 8-year-old girl can quickly rack up her college tuition). For example, I am currently doing Shakespeare in Glendale, CA. My salary? $ 15 per show! I can do a lot of plays and pursue camera and work with intermittent success, because I have an independent means of income, but otherwise, if I had to rely on my income as an actor, I would be collecting food. stamps, living with several roommates in Pacoima. And yet if I quit smoking today,

That may or may not sound like a success, but I can assure you that this "career" has broken me. I never imagined that it would be so difficult, that there would be so much rejection, disappointment, frustration and, worst of all, unemployment. So, I don't see acting as much as a career, as a vocation. (Don't expect too many calls, ha ha).

I learned that being a skilled actor earns you accolades from friends and colleagues, maybe even a plaque or two, but it doesn't entitle you to anything. He'll still have to fight like anyone else to cast Assistant DA Kowalski in “NCIS: Tulsa,” and the odds are not good. Oh, and you can be sure that the other competitors that have survived this far are also very skilled. I think it is a consolation.

The first step to a successful acting career is learning more about acting. Join acting classes and theaters near you, ask someone with acting experience questions about acting.

The second important thing is to hire a good agent, someone who has a reputation and has some connections that can get you some acting jobs.

And when you get your first acting job, do it like your life depends on it.

The best way to start your acting career is by taking acting classes, trying out different mediums of acting, and then selecting the one that works best for you. Maybe even go to dance or music classes, to help add more to resume and allow for various roles. You can also try theater before going to mainstream media, and it will help you focus before taking the next step. Also, you can try advertising companies and the fashion world to help stabilize a healthy income, as you will naturally struggle in your early years.

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