What should you do if you know you are going to lose your job in a month?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Patrick Harper



What should you do if you know you are going to lose your job in a month?

Hello there,

Here are some things you can do, depending on your situation:

  1. Reach out to senior colleagues for recommendations on your LinkedIn profile and also offline, if possible
  2. Initiate conversations with high-level colleagues, as well as people from other companies you have met on the job, and ask them for help with job opportunities. This can be done in person, as well as on LinkedIn.
  3. Catalog everything you've done in this job and make sure your resume is up to date
  4. Start applying for job opportunities listed on job boards and online job sites - at least 10 a day.

Don't give in to frustration. And be positioned

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Hello there,

Here are some things you can do, depending on your situation:

  1. Reach out to senior colleagues for recommendations on your LinkedIn profile and also offline, if possible
  2. Initiate conversations with high-level colleagues, as well as people from other companies you have met on the job, and ask them for help with job opportunities. This can be done in person, as well as on LinkedIn.
  3. Catalog everything you've done in this job and make sure your resume is up to date
  4. Start applying for job opportunities listed on job boards and online job sites - at least 10 a day.

Don't give in to frustration. And be positive at work. Make a good impression, you never know how that might help you in the future.

Hope this helps, good luck :)

Get all the medical care I need, but I've been putting it off ASAP. Refill all my prescriptions for 90 days. Minimize my expenses to save money. Start looking for another job and hopefully you will leave within 30 days.

Very important: Maintain current levels of performance and professionalism in your work.

maintain and spread, if possible, a positive attitude. It is not a death sentence. It is a door that closes and, God willing, another opens.

save as much money as possible whenever you can. Research your state's unemployment benefits process, food stamps, Medicare eligibility, etc. Get that game plan now, along with all the necessary contact information for requests, etc.

Gather all your work contacts and write a blurb about each one. you

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Very important: Maintain current levels of performance and professionalism in your work.

maintain and spread, if possible, a positive attitude. It is not a death sentence. It is a door that closes and, God willing, another opens.

save as much money as possible whenever you can. Research your state's unemployment benefits process, food stamps, Medicare eligibility, etc. Get that game plan now, along with all the necessary contact information for requests, etc.

Gather all your work contacts and write a blurb about each one. You'll want to email them when the time comes to let them know you've been downsized / business closed / and that they would appreciate if they would contact you if they learn of a suitable vacancy. Attach a well-written 1-page CV. Not necessarily a full resume, so they realize the highlights of your qualifications and career.

Talk to HR (if it's a planned shutdown / layoff) and see what you can expect from the company (if anything). Do you have a ballpark figure for COBRA health insurance? Will you be able to keep any of your benefits? Will they offer any compensation? You do this politely and with a cool head. It is only asking for and collecting information. Get the contact information for all the companies that provide the benefits. Including 401K material.

If you have had any contact with headhunters / recruiters, now is the time to renew those contacts. If not, set up some career alerts on websites like Indeed or Monster or your specific choice - whatever professional organization you belong to should have something too. I advise you to be very active on LinkedIn. Not because it's a magic bullet, but it can spark some interest. Enhance your resume, craft a cover letter / email aligned with each job you apply for. Apply for whatever comes up. Keep a careful record of work, contact, dates, and responses. Don't expect anything over 1%, but keep in mind that only one job offer is needed.

People usually find work through other people, so let everyone you know know that you will be fired in ("?") Months. Make some inexpensive business cards at your local office supply store with your name, contact information, and education (only the last relevant title / qualification), on one side. On the other hand, your last job title and the shortest possible résumé "10 years of customer service experience" or "qualified mechanical engineer." 5 years of experience ". Or whatever. If your job title doesn't make sense to outsiders, do a little research and find out what most companies call people who do what you do. Example: Your official title is "Customer Service Specialist II".

so that's what i would do. As well as working the best you can and spreading as much positivity as you can. Good luck!

This is a list I made after receiving my termination notice. I had a few months before my separation date. Not everyone is in dire financial straits when they lose a job, so respond appropriately to your situation.

While most people have focused on financially "defensive" moves (eg, saving money), I went on the offensive (eg, buying a rental home and opening a home equity line of credit) while still I had a solid income on my record. I thought it might be some time before a bank would lend me again.

  1. Change your W-2 tax breaks. If you need cash, lower your withholding tax, especially if
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This is a list I made after receiving my termination notice. I had a few months before my separation date. Not everyone is in dire financial straits when they lose a job, so respond appropriately to your situation.

While most people have focused on financially "defensive" moves (eg, saving money), I went on the offensive (eg, buying a rental home and opening a home equity line of credit) while still I had a solid income on my record. I thought it might be some time before a bank would lend me again.

  1. Change your W-2 tax breaks. If you need cash, lower your withholding tax, especially if you are in a lower tax bracket during the year.
  2. If you need cash, reduce your savings of 401K. In my case, I maxed out my 401K contributions as I still wanted the tax deduction but only had a few months to contribute to the annual maximum.
  3. Review and understand your benefits (eg, 401K, pensions, health care, stock options, etc.) after separation.
  4. Back up all critical business documents for future use (as long as you do not violate confidentiality agreements).
  5. Please backup your work email if you want to save it.
  6. Delete personal documents from your company directories and devices.
  7. Use the remaining sick time if it is not paid at the time of separation.
  8. Take advantage of company benefits (eg, corporate discounts, association of companies for charities, etc.) while you can.
  9. Use your health care benefits (for example, checkups, prescription drugs, etc.)
  10. File claims for your flexible spending accounts or you may lose them.
  11. Refinance your mortgage, open a HELOC or buy an investment property while you still qualify because banks are generally not too generous after you are unemployed.
  12. Open new credit card accounts if you need to.
  13. Start your job search by talking to your business network (eg competitors, suppliers, partners, current and past colleagues, etc.); there is nothing to be gained by keeping your situation a secret.
  14. Exchange contact information with colleagues and stay positive. Finding out that a colleague will be fired is like finding out that someone has been diagnosed with a terminal illness. It is uncomfortable and people can avoid it because they are not sure how to act around it. If you stay positive and connected, they are more likely to help you during and after the firing process.

This can be a difficult situation. I know because I've been there.

I spent years knowing that I would lose my job in the next month. Unfortunately, it didn't happen until years ago. Every time it seemed safe, something would come along and "save" things.

Imagine discarding a job as finished. A waste of time. Destined to end soon, no chance of a future there, no breakthrough, nothing good except continuing to pay the bills for a little while longer. Imagine staying in that situation for years. It takes a lot from you.

It cost me a lot.

Fortunately for me, it is finally over and I am making progress to

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This can be a difficult situation. I know because I've been there.

I spent years knowing that I would lose my job in the next month. Unfortunately, it didn't happen until years ago. Every time it seemed safe, something would come along and "save" things.

Imagine discarding a job as finished. A waste of time. Destined to end soon, no chance of a future there, no breakthrough, nothing good except continuing to pay the bills for a little while longer. Imagine staying in that situation for years. It takes a lot from you.

It cost me a lot.

Fortunately for me, it is finally over and I am moving toward much greater opportunities.

While my situation was not ideal and I do not recommend it, it does mean that I have a lot of experience knowing that my work will end soon. I made the mistakes and did the right things. Here are some suggestions based on my experience.

Don't stress - human beings crave certainty. Knowing that you have a job, even though no job is truly safe, or knowing that you don't have one provides that certainty. The time in between is when things can get nasty. Try to keep in mind that the situation is out of your control. This is a good thing. It means you don't have to worry about it.

Be glad it's over soon - there's one thing I've found that makes every shitty situation better. An end date. It's easy to say that you can take this a little longer than it is ... forever?

Don't complain: In these situations, your coworkers will want to participate in month-long fucking sessions. Why is this happening? Management is so terrible. Over and over with these things. It is neither useful nor useful. It takes you down to his level, the poor little victim of the evil system. This is not where you want to come from as you work towards your next big break.

Improve yourself: mentally, physically, emotionally. Start learning new skills. You should have been doing that already. Take some online courses or learn a language. Improve your diet and get more exercise. At least go for a walk every day if you can. Use the stairs instead of the elevator. Avoid bad people and situations that make you feel bad. Focus on all the things you can be thankful for in life.

Reduce your expenses: cancel your cable TV. Stop eating in restaurants and going out to bars so much. Cook and drink at home. Stop thinking of shopping as a form of entertainment. Comprehensive books have been written on how to spend less money, but most people can easily identify the places where they are losing money. Stop the bleeding now and keep the money.

Stop putting money in your 401k - Once you know for sure that the job is coming to an end, disable 401k contributions. This puts more money in your pocket now. You can save for retirement when you have income again. Take care of your immediate needs now. I don't recommend doing this until layoffs are a certainty, but you can use your own judgment.

Consider your options: there is the most obvious one, start applying for other jobs that are similar to the one you have now. This is not necessarily a bad option, but it is not your only option. Perhaps this could be an opportunity to make a career change. List all of your skills and think of the ways they could be applied to something different, ideally something that interests you the most and excites you. Think about your hobbies and what you liked to do when you were 10 years old. Could any of these things become a source of income for you? Consider starting a business or consulting if your skills support it. If you think you don't have the skills, think more carefully before dismissing this idea. You may come up with great ideas that you've never thought of before.

Take care of your brain: This is a difficult situation and your brain is what will help you get through it. Don't stay up until 4am filling it up with frozen pizzas and reality shows and hope it works out well. Cut your shit intake. Physical shit in the form of bad food and drink and mental shit in the form of harmful, negative or distracting means. Get enough sleep and support your brain with healthy foods.

Make lists of ideas - it doesn't matter what the topic is at first. The point is to make your brain have a hard time thinking about things. Pick a topic each day and write at least 10 ideas on that topic. The first ones are easy, then it becomes difficult. Like so many other things, this is also where it has its greatest benefit. I first heard of this technique from James Altucher and it is as transformative as it is simple.

Relax and don't worry. You will overcome this situation as you have overcome all kinds of nonsense in the past. With proper preparation and a good attitude, things will be even easier. Think of this as an opportunity rather than a problem. At this time of year ahead, you may very well find yourself doing something that you could only have dreamed of at this time last year.

Autonomous vehicles are likely to bring about huge social and economic changes, including second-order effects that no one anticipates today.

Some of my guesses:

  • The auto industry will practically collapse - car ownership is incredibly inefficient. Not only do you own a car that is not used most of the time, but that car is very oversupplied for what it is normally used for. The switch to shared autonomous cars will mean that we will need far fewer cars and that each car will be much cheaper to build as it only needs to have the size / battery / motor needed for the specific trip.
  • The end
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Autonomous vehicles are likely to bring about huge social and economic changes, including second-order effects that no one anticipates today.

Some of my guesses:

  • The auto industry will practically collapse - car ownership is incredibly inefficient. Not only do you own a car that is not used most of the time, but that car is very oversupplied for what it is normally used for. The switch to shared autonomous cars will mean that we will need far fewer cars and that each car will be much cheaper to build as it only needs to have the size / battery / motor needed for the specific trip.
  • The End of Oil: 70% of US oil consumption is for vehicles. Autonomous shared cars make it practical for many of them to be electric, because a small-range battery vehicle is fine for most trips. Expect huge geopolitical shocks as the importance of the Middle East diminishes.
  • The End of Home Cooking: It is incredibly inefficient for millions of people to cook small meals in their own kitchen. Self-driving cars will make food delivery services like Munchery as cheap as home cooking and cause a massive acceleration in their growth. Expect future houses to be built without kitchens.
  • The End of Retail Stores: Online shopping is already huge, but self-driving cars will put the nail in the coffin of retail stores by allowing for incredibly fast delivery and the ability for a car to come along with a selection of items that you can choose between. Expect future urban centers to consist only of social spaces like restaurants.
  • The End of Parking Spaces - Parking occupies a large amount of high-value land. Expect all of that to go away and cities to become much prettier.
  • A Housing Slump: High house prices in cities like San Francisco, New York, and London are due to housing shortages within a painless trip to good jobs. Anything that facilitates commuting and productive work while traveling will reduce the scarcity value of homes that are currently near employment centers.
  • Reinvent childhood: young children no longer need to depend on their parents to get around. This is likely to lead to a generation of children growing up more independently than today's children, with knock-on effects on how they act as adults.
  • Potential increase in the use of long-distance trains: Initial autonomous cars may be optimized for low-speed driving over short distances and deferred to high-speed trains (or hyperloops) for the long-distance portion of a trip. The presence of an efficient power system has the potential to make high-speed rail that much more important.
  • Further decline in "culture of ownership" - A car is one of the most important things you own. Expect cultural impacts from more and more people who don't own a car, and therefore people who think less of "owning" as something.
  • Unexpected Social Impacts of Mobility: Every time it becomes easier for people to move around, there are social impacts.

I am sure there are many other important things. This is out of my head.

Five weeks ago, my world, as I knew it, was shattered around me.

You see, I have the immense pleasure of working with children, illuminating their lives while helping them dramatically improve their math grades and change their views on the subject. My children, as I called them, were the light in my life for the six months since the Mathnasium center opened, and seeing their warm smiles and laughter that I had evoked is truly an experience that I miss very much now. It is a wonderful feeling to have so many angels who love you, to make such a big difference in their lives and to have that feeling.

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Five weeks ago, my world, as I knew it, was shattered around me.

You see, I have the immense pleasure of working with children, illuminating their lives while helping them dramatically improve their math grades and change their views on the subject. My children, as I called them, were the light in my life for the six months since the Mathnasium center opened, and seeing their warm smiles and laughter that I had evoked is truly an experience that I miss very much now. It is a wonderful feeling to have so many angels who love you, to make such a big difference in their lives, and to have that purpose in your life, but it burns so much more when it is taken away from you.

May 25, 2017. That fateful day. He was clearing the tables, while dispatching the last student of the day, Elijah. As he leaves, he yells "See you on Saturday, right Ahmed?" I give him a smile and say, "Be here or be straight." He hits me first and says "Bye Ahmed" and I turn around to finish the tables. I hear the sound of the office door opening and look up to see a man I still respect and am immensely grateful to for giving me this opportunity. The owner of the center comes out and says "Ahmed, I need to tell you something." I ask you to tell me about it in my trademark carefree style. He says, "No, I think you should sit down."

My heart started beating a little faster now; the world slowed down and I started thinking things. You see, I was in the hot seat because of my punctuality, or rather because of my lack of punctuality, because as a college student using the highly unreliable public transportation system for a long trip (1 hour 10 minutes total) I tended to arrive on the dot ONLY if everything worked out for me and a couple of minutes late otherwise, which was at least once a week.

So that's when my world was shattered, when I was fired, when my promise to "be there" with Elijah was broken, when the joy was taken from my life.

Well, I'm a 19-year-old boy, but I admit it, that night I cried myself to sleep, and a couple of times afterwards too. I couldn't stop my brain from imagining the faces of all my children when they found out I had been fired, their gasps, their sadness for which I was responsible.

Then I let myself cry. I cried alone, I cried on my dad's broad shoulders, I cried while my mom comforted me with her tender touch. I even broke down and sobbed on the phone, begging my former boss to give me my job back.

But feeling terrible and crying my heart, instead of repressing my emotions, it opened a passage in me that allowed me to see that all is not lost, to start moving on to the next thing, and to start taking action again to recreate myself. my world. That energy has manifested today. Another Mathnasium center hired me !!!

I hope to create even better memories here so help me God :)

Call to Action: If you liked (or hated) my story or my writing style, feel free to comment; after all, feedback helps us grow, both as a writer and as a person. Thanks to Mary for being the first to do it; I love you because of that.

Ahmed

First, my generic answer:

The problem with all these "when AI will replace job XXX?" The question is, does it imply an “all or nothing” answer… As if one day we had humans doing XXX and the next they would all be replaced by machines and what happens before is not important.

The way automation (machines and AI) works is to make people more productive. By doing so, a business may need fewer people to do the same (or more) amount of work; for example, an accounting firm may have employed 20 people in physical "pencil and paper" days ... but now it does the same job with as few as 5 people

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First, my generic answer:

The problem with all these "when AI will replace job XXX?" The question is, does it imply an “all or nothing” answer… As if one day we had humans doing XXX and the next they would all be replaced by machines and what happens before is not important.

The way automation (machines and AI) works is to make people more productive. By doing so, a business may need fewer people to do the same (or more) amount of work; for example, an accounting firm may have employed 20 people in physical "pen and paper" days ... but now it does the same job with as few as 5 people using specialized accounting software on a computer. Automation "replaced" more than 15 people ... but there are still people doing those jobs.

The same is going to happen with AI. I suspect that 50 years from now there will still be many people doing the same jobs that people do today ... but there may be fewer of them doing it because they will use AI to help them be more productive than all the people needed to do that job now.

IOW: Instead of asking about automation replacing a job… ask how automation can help people do that job more efficiently.

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Now for a specific answer: one day you won't have a job and the next you won't have a job; At first you will lose some (probably minor) tasks to an AI ... then some more ... more complicated ... then more and more a little more complicated until your company runs out of things to do instead of tasks that you lost (probably one by one) to an AI. Only then will they consider eliminating their position.

At least that's probably true for most office jobs ...

OTOH: if you are a professional driver or cashier:

I hope 2020 is the decade of driverless vehicles. By 2030, most people will probably not own their own cars. When you need to go somewhere, you will call a service like Uber and a driverless vehicle will appear at your location to take you where you need to go.

The cost of insurance to drive a vehicle manually will increase prohibitively.

Package delivery services will work without a driver, but there is probably still a delivery person in each vehicle to carry packages from the curb to the office, to the porch, etc.

Long haul trucks will probably not have a driver, but may have a security person / guard. (Note: there are approximately 3.5 million professional truck drivers in the United States.) There are unresolved issues with refueling and parking / docking at the destination.

An autonomous cargo truck just crossed the country to deliver butter

Driverless vehicle programs see 3 accidents in 32,000 trips (driverless vehicle programs see 3 accidents in 32,000 trips)

Where to find autonomous cars on the road right now (Where to find autonomous cars on the road right now)

Here's an autonomous vehicle that appears to be moving forward: the bus (here's an autonomous vehicle that appears to be moving forward: the bus)

Taxi drivers (humans) will be obsolete.

You can now ride a driverless shuttle service in Las Vegas, for free (you can now ride a driverless shuttle service in Las Vegas, for free)

AUTONOM CAB (AUTONOM CAB)

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Grocery stores are currently working to eliminate cashiers. The act of putting something in your shopping cart will add it to your tab and when you leave the store your account will be charged.

Between Walmart and Kroger, 500 stores are about to get rid of cashiers (https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/09/between-walmart-and-kroger-500-stores-are-ab2018/02/ 01 / amazon -go-and-the-2-3-million-ATMs-out-to-ditch-cashiers.html)

Amazon Go and the 2.3 million ATMs it could leave behind: https: //www.forbes.com/sites/justcapital/it-could-leave-behind/

In today's market, very difficult, especially in the UK. We currently have around 8 million people out of work (not the cozy 3 million our government suggests). I have been on and off work for the past 16 years, which was due in the first instance to an epileptic seizure at my employer's site and nearly killed myself in the process as a result of swallowing my tongue (thanks Martin for saving my life clearing my tongue with his bare hands I'm so glad I didn't bite my fingers, which could have happened!)

The immediate response is to go to the greatest number of

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In today's market, very difficult, especially in the UK. We currently have around 8 million people out of work (not the cozy 3 million our government suggests). I have been on and off work for the past 16 years, which was due in the first instance to an epileptic seizure at my employer's site and nearly killed myself in the process as a result of swallowing my tongue (thanks Martin for saving my life clearing my tongue with his bare hands I'm so glad I didn't bite my fingers, which could have happened!)

The immediate response is to go to all the employment agencies you can to register and confirm that you are available immediately, that is, 24 hours in advance. You will need your CV and, if you have one, at least one recent reference.

If you have specific skills, write to companies or businesses in your immediate area that are likely to require those skills, along with your supporting CV, and (indeed) offering your services.

There used to be a time when you could walk into the front desk of a company, hand over your CV to the CEO or Personnel Manager, and they would contact you to confirm if they had anything available. In the retail market (stores), you could walk into the store and ask to see the manager and ask if there was work available; in fact, for the occasional job (literally), many workers used to walk up to a construction site and offer their services directly to the site foreman.

Sadly, in the UK in particular, ever-increasing red tape, especially health and safety (there is a statute spanning roughly three volumes related to the matter), means those days of walking to the site are over. The same is true even with stores. In fact, the Health and Safety at Work Act of 1974 took things from the sublime to the ridiculous, going from people wearing "flip flops" to everyone having to wear a helmet and steel-toed boots anywhere. in the place.

Again in the UK, there are actually more people who need and want to work, than jobs, and the supposed unemployment figure of 3 million is probably closer to 8 million, thanks to some pretty creative accounting, by governments, whatever. political color that can be. I imagine it is a similar situation in the United States and, indeed, in Europe.

As a result of this massive pool of potential employees, companies are being pedantic and very specific in job specifications, to the point of absurdity; in some cases I am surprised that they did not ask that my blood group be of a specific type. Regarding the number of applications, a friend of mine who has been in the recruiting business since at least 1990, stated that she placed a job advertisement for a junior office worker (probably in the 16-19 age range) and her first job and received 300 applications within 48 hours of posting the ad on the Internet.

What was most concerning was that the applicants were not only in the 16-19 age group, but the applicants of all ages, discipline levels, and seniority. Thus came this "overqualified" nonsense. While I can accept that in a permanent job, someone who will find the job boring and will move on when things improve will be costly to the employer; But this is not just down to skill sets, but to the business sector as well.

The short solution to immediate unemployment was temporary work, but even this has become equally competitive, with interviews required to accept even the most basic jobs. In the 1970s and 1980s, his agency simply called him on the phone and asked if he would attend his clients' offices the next morning. Now even these types of jobs require less and less frequent interviews and "instant starts".

I would suggest that if you are literally looking for something, just create a very simple CV, giving a basic outline of what you have done in the past, but don't make it too technical, and as comprehensive as possible to attract as many would be the possible employers. Also, keep in mind that the longer you are out of work

I wish you the best of luck in your search, especially if you are in the position where you urgently need work.

Sincerely

Chris R - London.

Relax, be patient and review the points below !!!

Just remember that if you finished this job you just lost, you can get over any other, but the most important thing is to learn a few things about it ...

# 1. If you have any financial backing, take a little break and analyze the reason why you lost this job, for example if it was your mistake, if the company went through a restructuring, the company ran out of funds, did you do something illegitimate, etc. etc etc ... the reasons can be many.

# 2. Considering the reason for your loss, do not repeat the same mistake one more time when you are trying to find or

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Relax, be patient and review the points below !!!

Just remember that if you finished this job you just lost, you can get over any other, but the most important thing is to learn a few things about it ...

# 1. If you have any financial backing, take a little break and analyze the reason why you lost this job, for example if it was your mistake, if the company went through a restructuring, the company ran out of funds, did you do something illegitimate, etc. etc etc ... the reasons can be many.

# 2. Considering the reason for your loss, do not repeat the same mistake one more time when you are trying to find or have already found a new job or else you will enter a vicious cycle of getting and losing a job each time and all your hard work. goes in vain.

# 3.Prepare your resume, search the job market, see what jobs are in demand, and apply for those according to your skills. Take trainings, attend online courses, surf the web

# 4. Have confidence in yourself, be supported by family, close friends, and loved ones. In these difficult times, they are the ones who accompany you as pillars of strength.

# 5. Not only is it difficult, but it also adds some smart work to your job search.

In the end, I can wish you all the best and advise you to have faith in the Almighty.

You will get over it.

Good luck!!

Hey,

I think I can survive more than 36 months, but you need to know why I can do that.

It seems that they will not pay me until the restaurants start again in my city, I work for a company that has 4 outlets, they cannot pay because the business is zero!

So here are the things that free me from worry for over 36 months!

  • I basically have zero debt / loan
  • I own my house.
  • I am single and my parents do not depend on me.
  • I live very frugally and have a minimalist lifestyle.
  • I have reserve cash to live 36 months, just for food, water and internet.
  • I will have a small source of income (should start at c
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Hey,

I think I can survive more than 36 months, but you need to know why I can do that.

It seems that they will not pay me until the restaurants start again in my city, I work for a company that has 4 outlets, they cannot pay because the business is zero!

So here are the things that free me from worry for over 36 months!

  • I basically have zero debt / loan
  • I own my house.
  • I am single and my parents do not depend on me.
  • I live very frugally and have a minimalist lifestyle.
  • I have reserve cash to live 36 months, just for food, water and internet.
  • I will have a small source of income (should start in a couple of months)
  • Some land investments, equity investments, and gold (not much though)

In a way, if my little source of income comes in, I may never have to rely on salary. But again, I won't be able to earn, save, and invest more if covid-19 doesn't stop!

You don't really need much, but for me, buying my house (recently) and getting out of the rental trap showed me the importance of owning a home.

To hell with all those people and the media who say a home is worth investing in.

Everyone be safe!

This covid-19 thing will end soon. Please maintain social distancing and prepare to seize the next big opportunity.

Several times, even several times fired, but for reasons that would have been defined more as a dismissal. Frankly fired is fired, no matter how nice you want to express it.

One that particularly sticks in my mind was a job I had while in college, a restaurant where I was a line cook. It was actually more of a large scale fast food place if you want to go, but it had a classy location, tables to sit and wait staff. I had worked there for at least a year without taking time, so I asked for a night off; I don't remember why, but it was imperative that he have time. th

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Several times, even several times fired, but for reasons that would have been defined more as a dismissal. Frankly fired is fired, no matter how nice you want to express it.

One that particularly sticks in my mind was a job I had while in college, a restaurant where I was a line cook. It was actually more of a large scale fast food place if you want to go, but it had a classy location, tables to sit and wait staff. I had worked there for at least a year without taking time, so I asked for a night off; I don't remember why, but it was imperative that he have time. the manager, who was one of the last in what was a series of managers in a corporate management chain, said he would contact me. Well, I never got an answer. When the time came (I'd given them a long wait), I just didn't show up.

On my next shift, the manager calls me into the office and precedes me to chastise me, but in a nice way.

"You know, I could fire you for doing that."

I was not in the mood. "So fire me," I said. He was prepared to walk and could easily get another job. He had bluffed him.

He was practically apoplectic that he was so taken aback, stammering, "Well, I don't want to do that." From then on, we had a nice discussion about hours, working conditions, getting more help, etc.

I didn't mean to be contentious, but it worked in my favor. Got a small raise and first choice of schedule.

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