What should I put in the subject line of an email when applying for a job?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Bailey Palmer



What should I put in the subject line of an email when applying for a job?

There are 2 possible answers to this question.

For most of you, you are looking at a receipt online and have some kind of sin, something for which the company or recruiting firm has launched the network and you are applying for a position.

Then, in, the subject line can be read with the title of the position so that in this way, the reader is clear what it is that you are requesting. If the company asks you to include the job title or some other indicator that specifies what type of job you are applying for in particular. Include that as well as an example might say job 2714 accountant and men

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There are 2 possible answers to this question.

For most of you, you are looking at a receipt online and have some kind of sin, something for which the company or recruiting firm has launched the network and you are applying for a position.

Then, in, the subject line can be read with the title of the position so that in this way, the reader is clear what it is that you are requesting. If the company asks you to include the job title or some other indicator that specifies what type of job you are applying for in particular. Include that as an example might say 2714 accountant job and mention line of business. So what you are doing is making it clear to the reader why you are sending the email. After all, you have to remember their inbox that you are thinking that it is an email, your email, they are receiving many more in the course of the day. So you're helping them sort through their inbox.

Th. And defend your candidacy for the position. The second condition that people have when they are applying for a job is that you refer someone. In that case, what you say is "I am referred by so and so" and therefore they know that you are simply not a stranger who submitted a resume for a position. You are someone who introduces them and then you use the body of the email to mention the person's name again.

In both cases, you are stating why you are qualified to do this job, so it is a sales letter, but what it is is one in which you try to make it clear to the reader why you are there. and why should they talk to you.

I have sent out a lot of job application emails and have been thinking a lot about this question.

Be sure to check if the company has specific requirements on how they want the subject line to be formatted. They may use some kind of filter, and just because you didn't read the instructions carefully, you might miss out.

If nothing was mentioned in the job posting, I use the following receipt to try and come up with a good subject line.

  • keep it short but not too short
  • Avoid likes of genetic topics like - "Job application", try to make it a little more personal
  • try to stand out and make a good imp
Keep reading

I have sent out a lot of job application emails and have been thinking a lot about this question.

Be sure to check if the company has specific requirements on how they want the subject line to be formatted. They may use some kind of filter, and just because you didn't read the instructions carefully, you might miss out.

If nothing was mentioned in the job posting, I use the following receipt to try and come up with a good subject line.

  • keep it short but not too short
  • Avoid likes of genetic topics like - "Job application", try to make it a little more personal
  • Try to stand out and make a good impression.
  • don't sound desperate or arrogant
  • Have a clear vision of how you would like to be perceived (funny, smart, professional, etc.). I guess it depends a lot on the position you are pursuing. I will always recommend being yourself, the best version of yourself. If you get the job, you would like to feel comfortable going to work knowing that you don't have to live up to certain expectations that you have falsely set.
  • Research the company culture and align the issue accordingly. If the company descriptions give a serious, professional and suits-only air, don't try to impress them with phrases like "Since we can't all win the lottery ..." (you never know, it might work, but don't risk it)

Good luck!

Email subject line examples

CEO position

Job posting n. 321: District Sales Manager

Communications Director Position - Your Name

Sales Associate Application

Query - Your name

Social media expert looking for new opportunities

Marketing Director Looking for a Next Position: 10 Years of Experience

Research assistant resume

Reference: your name

Referred by First Name Last Name

Informational Interview Request-XYZ College Student

Thank You - Job Title Interview

Meeting follow-up: meeting topic

Meeting request: your name

Example: Data Scientist, # 123456 - John Smith Request

Example: referred by Jane B

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Email subject line examples

CEO position

Job posting n. 321: District Sales Manager

Communications Director Position - Your Name

Sales Associate Application

Query - Your name

Social media expert looking for new opportunities

Marketing Director Looking for a Next Position: 10 Years of Experience

Research assistant resume

Reference: your name

Referred by First Name Last Name

Informational Interview Request-XYZ College Student

Thank You - Job Title Interview

Meeting follow-up: meeting topic

Meeting request: your name

Example: Data Scientist, # 123456 - John Smith Request

Example: Recommended by Jane Brown for the position of Technical Writer

Example: Job Inquiry: Award-Winning Creative Director Now in New York

Example: Marketing Director with 8 years of experience

Example: John Smith tracking sales position

The subject line of the email is the first thing the employer sees while checking their inboxes. The decision to delete or open it is made by viewing the subject line.

The subject line of an email when applying for a job is the first impression it made on the employer.

TIPS FOR WRITING AN EMAIL SUBJECT LINE WHILE APPLYING FOR A JOB:

  1. Mention the job title, so the employer knows what position you are applying for.
  2. Keep it professional
  3. Keep it short and crisp

What to include in the subject line:

  • Job title
  • Job id (if there is one)
  • Your name

Example:

"Job Application - Digital Marketing Manager, Job ID # 123456 - Pin

Keep reading

The subject line of the email is the first thing the employer sees while checking their inboxes. The decision to delete or open it is made by viewing the subject line.

The subject line of an email when applying for a job is the first impression it made on the employer.

TIPS FOR WRITING AN EMAIL SUBJECT LINE WHILE APPLYING FOR A JOB:

  1. Mention the job title, so the employer knows what position you are applying for.
  2. Keep it professional
  3. Keep it short and crisp

What to include in the subject line:

  • Job title
  • Job id (if there is one)
  • Your name

Example:

"Job Application - Digital Marketing Manager, Job ID # 123456 - Pinky Kumar"

0r

Recommended by Soofia Ali for business development work (in case someone recommends it.

Hope this helps people looking for a change / job.

  1. If there is a vacancy or a posted position, please mention the job details in the email subject (best option).
  2. Example: Procurement Manager_ExxonMobil (position and company name both)
  3. Example: Part No. 1223_Procurement Manager_ExxonMobil
  4. If there is a vacancy and it has NOT been posted yet, mention Discipline and Title.
  5. Example: Mechanical Engineer_field or Mechanical Engineer_Project or Operations or Commissioning Engineer_Oil and Gas.
  6. If one submits their CV for inclusion in an organization's HR database of potential candidates, then
  7. Example: Arnold Scharzneger_Chemical Engineer or Sylvestor St
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  1. If there is a vacancy or a posted position, please mention the job details in the email subject (best option).
  2. Example: Procurement Manager_ExxonMobil (position and company name both)
  3. Example: Part No. 1223_Procurement Manager_ExxonMobil
  4. If there is a vacancy and it has NOT been posted yet, mention Discipline and Title.
  5. Example: Mechanical Engineer_field or Mechanical Engineer_Project or Operations or Commissioning Engineer_Oil and Gas.
  6. If one submits their CV for inclusion in an organization's HR database of potential candidates, then
  7. Example: Arnold Scharzneger_Chemical Engineer or Sylvestor Stallone_Electronic Engineer (name and discipline)
  8. The intent of all of the above is to prevent emails from going to the spam tray. If you know someone at that company, when you call, it would be easy for the executive to easily trace their email if you follow the examples above.

Hi there! An interesting question! It MUST get attention, don't underestimate the matter! It could make the difference between whether or not your email is read.

Imagine that you receive emails from 2 candidates.

Which one would you feel most eager to open? The one that says "My application for the job as a digital marketer" or the candidate email that writes "10 reasons why you should hire me as your digital marketer"?

I always used the second version because it arouses the reader's curiosity and motivates everyone to know more about it. I use this strategy also for my writing / translation / c

Keep reading

Hi there! An interesting question! It MUST get attention, don't underestimate the matter! It could make the difference between whether or not your email is read.

Imagine that you receive emails from 2 candidates.

Which one would you feel most eager to open? The one that says "My application for the job as a digital marketer" or the candidate email that writes "10 reasons why you should hire me as your digital marketer"?

I always used the second version because it arouses the reader's curiosity and motivates everyone to know more about it. I use this strategy for my writing / translation / coaching / speaking assignments as well and it gained me many more clients for various tasks. Instantly grab attention. Apply it and you will see the difference!

Well, it doesn't have to be "10", but as long as they are good reasons that make you stand out, use them!

All the best,

Karin

It depends on who you send the email to. If you are an executive recruiter, always use this convention: XYZ Title Confidential Search or XYZ Title Open Search. Confidential if you are employed and do not want what you are looking for made public. Open if you are not employed and it is ok if it is public what you are looking for. This helps them tremendously.

For everyone else, this is my advice. Open your LinkedIn profile and look at your photo. Write as if you were writing to them. A real person. Not to the masses. Be real. People like that more than something that feels like it's written forever

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It depends on who you send the email to. If you are an executive recruiter, always use this convention: XYZ Title Confidential Search or XYZ Title Open Search. Confidential if you are employed and do not want what you are looking for made public. Open if you are not employed and it is ok if it is public what you are looking for. This helps them tremendously.

For everyone else, this is my advice. Open your LinkedIn profile and look at your photo. Write as if you were writing to them. A real person. Not to the masses. Be real. People like that more than something that feels like it's written for everyone, like a peanut butter approach to spreading email all over the place. I find that my subject lines are different for each person I write to.

Usually I copy and paste the subject line of the job, such as the title used in the job posting.

Since you are asking about an email response to a job, I usually type a message like.

Subject: Re: <job title>

Body:

To whom it may concern
(or interviewer's name if you have a direct email address)

I am currently in the market for <job title> and given the job description I feel like I meet most / all of your requirements.

See the attached document to see my resume.

Sincerely,
full name

I don't make them long because the resume should speak for itself.

See also:

How should I title the topic?

Keep reading

Usually I copy and paste the subject line of the job, such as the title used in the job posting.

Since you are asking about an email response to a job, I usually type a message like.

Subject: Re: <job title>

Body:

To whom it may concern
(or interviewer's name if you have a direct email address)

I am currently in the market for <job title> and given the job description I feel like I meet most / all of your requirements.

See the attached document to see my resume.

Sincerely,
full name

I don't make them long because the resume should speak for itself.

See also:

How should I title the subject line of a follow-up email 2 weeks after a job interview that I have not heard from?

I would put the title of the post, the job number (if there is one) and your name at least. If you know someone who works there (recruiters LOVE employee referrals) write something like this:

Ricky Bobby Employee Referral - Al Pollard Candidate for Talent Acquisition Manager # 8675309

You want to stand out, give them the information they need and be able to search.

Good luck and don't forget to be awesome!

Generally speaking, if the company had a career page, use it and request it there. If you email someone directly, it may not end up in your ATS candidate tracking system, which means your resume will never be seen.

If sending an email is the ONLY way to apply (and again I emphasize this because as a recruiter I almost always ignore those direct emails), your name and the position you are applying for should also suffice as a subject line.

Example

Subject: Jon Snow - Civil Engineer, Winterfell

Good luck!

Be short, sweet, and professional.

The important thing is to clearly communicate your intention. For instance:

  1. Job inquiry - Job title - Your name
  2. Job title - Application - Your name

The more structured and informative you can be, the better. Chances are, the human resources department is receiving submissions for various positions. Being descriptive in the subject line will help them identify the intent of the email, the position it is aimed at, and who you are.

I hope this helps!

Other Guides:


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