What should I put as "job title" if I don't have one?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Dexter Marsh



What should I put as "job title" if I don't have one?

If you have a job, you have a job title or role or function or job category or description. The job "title" is just a short way of explaining to someone what you do. Maybe you don't have a business card with a formal title. But if you have a job, there is a way to describe it. If you work in a place like a fast food restaurant or retail store, you can perform multiple jobs or functions. You may be flipping burgers in a minute and running the cash register or cleaning the restrooms later. It is not essential to have a descriptive title in a case like that. Often times, companies that have a broad base of ro

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If you have a job, you have a job title or role or function or job category or description. The job "title" is just a short way of explaining to someone what you do. Maybe you don't have a business card with a formal title. But if you have a job, there is a way to describe it. If you work in a place like a fast food restaurant or retail store, you can perform multiple jobs or functions. You may be flipping burgers in a minute and running the cash register or cleaning the restrooms later. It is not essential to have a descriptive title in a case like that. Often times, companies that have broad-based roles like that simply call their staff "associates" or "staff members."

If you work on a farm or on construction equipment or some other manual job, you may be called a laborer.

If you received an offer letter to start your employment, there is most likely a title or position described in the offer letter. Or when you applied for the job, there was a job with a title.

You don't have to turn this into a science project. If you don't really have a title or role or function as defined by your employer, you know what you're doing. Find a suitable and descriptive job title and use it.

You can list the type of work you do instead of a specific title. For example, if you are doing customer service work but do not have the title of customer service representative, then you can simply put in customer service. If you are working on something managerial but you are not specifically a manager, you can use administration. Therefore, it is perfectly acceptable to use descriptors of what your role is rather than an actual job title.

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Instead, write a job description.

For example, "cook", "concierge", "cashier", and so on.

If your job duties were extremely varied, something like this would work on a resume:

March 2018 - Present: I currently work for XYZ Corp. performing various duties including office cleaning, office work, greeting customers, and assembling widgets.

You need a general dog body ... but seriously a general worker / operator or something similar ... how can you have a job description that is required by law if you don't have a title?

Actually, that's a pretty interesting question.

Your occupation is the field of work that you are qualified to perform (and choose to perform). It is yours, it is part of you and it follows you unless you neglect it.

Your job title is the title given to the specific position in an organization that you hold. Job titles belong to the organization and stay on the job, regardless of whether or not you do. They usually pre-exist to you and will still be there in some variation when you are at your retirement party and long after. Job titles tend to be more specific than occ

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Actually, that's a pretty interesting question.

Your occupation is the field of work that you are qualified to perform (and choose to perform). It is yours, it is part of you and it follows you unless you neglect it.

Your job title is the title given to the specific position in an organization that you hold. Job titles belong to the organization and stay on the job, regardless of whether or not you do. They usually pre-exist to you and will still be there in some variation when you are at your retirement party and long after. Job titles tend to be more specific than occupation descriptors. "Junior Tax Auditor Assistant" (I just made it up) vs "Finance". Hope it's obvious which is which.

Another way to think about it: your occupation says something about your skills and interests. A job title speaks more about the requirements of the job. When you occupy a particular job, your skills and interests must match the requirements of the job.

Claire Jackson's response is excellent. I would just add that this is really a strategy question. If you are satisfied in your current job and just want people to understand you better, something like "Engineering Focused Sotware Designer" followed by a separate list of your specialized keywords, eg "Full Stack", "Python", C #, ”Etc., would be nice. If you were in between situations, the best would be the specific title (s) and keywords that you are targeting in your job search. As long as you are at your current employer, you could do anything that does not imply that you are looking for a cha

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Claire Jackson's response is excellent. I would just add that this is really a strategy question. If you are satisfied in your current job and just want people to understand you better, something like "Engineering Focused Sotware Designer" followed by a pipelined list of your specialized keywords, for example "Full Stack", "Python ", C #,” Etc., would be nice. If you were in between situations, the best would be the specific title (s) and keywords that you are targeting in your job search. As long as you are at your current employer, you could do anything that does not imply that you are looking for a change, as this could set the unwanted wheels in motion. "Software Engineer" seems like a splendid description of what you really do, and it is your profile, after all. Just make the specific experience item have the official title, and explain what it really means in the details. By the way, I see the word "design" in many jobs that may seem a bit far-fetched, at least to a visual designer / developer like me. However, the word "design" could apply to anything intentional, for example, "systems design", and I choose to take it as a sign that design thinking is making headway, and all the cool guys want to be known as " designers ". After all, my personal motto is "Design Life!" I hope this is useful. And all the cool guys want to be known as "designers." After all, my personal motto is "Design Life!" I hope this is useful. And all the cool guys want to be known as "designers." After all, my personal motto is "Design Life!" I hope this is useful.

And remember…

You have a closed job description.

As well as a multiple definition / broad spectrum or remote work.

So you have to ask before committing.

The job you are signing up for must be commensurate with your skills, experience and qualifications.

I follow what you try to say.

He has been hired as the person responsible for the transport of goods.

When suddenly, the boss orders you to pick up his children from school?

Can you refuse?

Chances are you will do that and still see yourself in a job, huh?

If it is during work hours and not beyond your skill level (you are a driver / manager for crying out loud)

So you know

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And remember…

You have a closed job description.

As well as a multiple definition / broad spectrum or remote work.

So you have to ask before committing.

The job you are signing up for must be commensurate with your skills, experience and qualifications.

I follow what you try to say.

He has been hired as the person responsible for the transport of goods.

When suddenly, the boss orders you to pick up his children from school?

Can you refuse?

Chances are you will do that and still see yourself in a job, huh?

If it is during work hours and not beyond your skill level (you are a driver / manager for crying out loud)

Then you should not complain or make unpleasant comments to your employer.

Suck it up and do it.

However, you can point out the risk factors associated with things that you are being asked to do outside of your field of expertise.

Perhaps you are qualified to be a draftsman, when suddenly asked to become involved in the physical aspects of building and construction.

Here you can politely but firmly refuse to comply, and it will be within your legal rights to do so.

Did a waitress ask to change the baby's diaper for the boss?

Refuse completely even if it means you risk losing your job.

What employers don't understand is that we employ people's services and not their dignity.

No more Baas and Boetie stories allowed in post-apartheid!

Don't stay in a career where you don't feel appreciated or comfortable.

Consider yourself worthy enough to know when to just walk away.

You deserve to be respected, like everyone else.

Essentially the same as you should do with your title in any other situation. The titles are not real, just symbols that some people seem to care a lot about. Any new job is different from what you are used to doing, this applies down to the CEO level, and the first question is whether you have the skills to do the new job or can you figure out how to learn most of the ones you don't have. Don't know and get someone else to help you with what you can't learn? (Very few people comfortably occupy the boxes that firms like to create for them.) If the answer to this question is no, then you have bigger problems.

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Essentially the same as you should do with your title in any other situation. The titles are not real, just symbols that some people seem to care a lot about. Any new job is different from what you are used to doing, this applies down to the CEO level, and the first question is whether you have the skills to do the new job or can you figure out how to learn most of the ones you don't have. Don't know and get someone else to help you with what you can't learn? (Very few people comfortably occupy the boxes that firms like to create for them.) If the answer to this question is no, then you have bigger problems than your title used to be.

Did you represent yourself honestly? If you did and can get the job done, then I wouldn't worry about the past, it's not your problem and you have other things to worry about. If you didn't, then it's more complicated and I'm not the best person to deal with such complications and someone else will know better, but consider not complicating your life next time.

There is a possibility that they know very well that this is the case at their old company, but think that you can get the job done.

I think so, personally I include each job title as a separate thing with start and end dates. However, there is a limit to this, if, for example, I was an intermediate collaborator on project A for 6 months and then a main collaborator on project B for 8 months, I could make them a collaborator. However, this is dependent on seniority level as you need more padding first and it is important to list your newest and highest positions separately always. This is mostly relevant to the tech industry as that is where my own experience lies, although it seems likely to apply.

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I think so, personally I include each job title as a separate thing with start and end dates. However, there is a limit to this, if, for example, I was an intermediate collaborator on project A for 6 months and then a main collaborator on project B for 8 months, I could make them a collaborator. However, this is dependent on seniority level as you need more padding first and it is important to list your newest and highest positions separately always. This is mostly relevant to the tech industry as that is where my own experience lies, although it seems likely to apply elsewhere.

TL; DR lists them separately or under a title that covers both (i.e. intermediate and senior contributor roles become contributor only)

Your resume should have your current job title written on it if you are still employed. If you are no longer at that job, you can put the job title you had followed by the dates you were employed. Some people who are not employed will list the job title they had when they were employed without any indication that they are no longer there by skipping the end date, or rather the year, as most people do not use the previous month a year, unless the tenure was very short. None of this is very important, but what it is, is using a title that you are requesting that makes absolutely no sense.

You list the title and then a very short string of other "titles" that describe the role.

It is advisable to include your actual title as the first title. The other titles could be more descriptive. Then, in the body of the paragraph, describe the different roles.

Customer Service Manager | Office manager | Business Development
Led a customer service team of ~ 15 while managing the back office and sales while the company was looking for an office manager and a sales manager. Key accounts managed after initial sales. Customer service team hired, trained and developed ...

Inflation of credentials. If your employer has a human resources department with a controlled job description and the values ​​by which your performance is evaluated (along with a pay grade associated with a title), you cannot define your own titles. (I clearly recognize that it is a bit strange for a title).

With that said, Tom Peters, in his book, In Pursuit of Excellence, told a great story about allowing a key contributor to create their own title and business cards because it helped her feel better recognized for what she thought she was doing and, how such, the company was better for it.

If you feel the current title n

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Inflation of credentials. If your employer has a human resources department with a controlled job description and the values ​​by which your performance is evaluated (along with a pay grade associated with a title), you cannot define your own titles. (I clearly recognize that it is a bit strange for a title).

With that said, Tom Peters, in his book, In Pursuit of Excellence, told a great story about allowing a key contributor to create their own title and business cards because it helped her feel better recognized for what she thought she was doing and, how such, the company was better for it.

If you think the current title is inappropriate, ask for a change, rather than assume it. Since you say 'crew', would they all get the same title?

Personally, I am very amused by the number of Executive Vice President of Sales that I have seen in a single company (I remember there were seven in a company, led, of course, by the SENIOR Executive Vice President of Sales, reporting to the VP of Sales and Marketing…; ^ D - while all other senior management positions had only one title per role). Maybe you should look for an even bigger promotion to something like that because the driver of the behavior that spawned the multiple VPs is that it's a help to the customer that doesn't feel important enough unless you're dealing directly with a VP of some sort. .

You would write a job description of what you think you do and give the position a title that you think is appropriate, but wait until they get approved. Try to justify a raise too!

Personally, I am less interested in the title than in the $ to accompany the work.

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